Integrating Argo CD for Your Kubernetes Project

Integrating Argo CD for Your Kubernetes Project

Argo CD is an open-source continues delivery tool for your project which runs on Kubernetes. Argo CD can be identified as an open-source continuous delivery tool for Kubernetes which has a graphical user interface to see Kubernetes components inside the cluster.

Argo CD can be identified as an open-source continuous delivery tool for Kubernetes which has a graphical user interface to see Kubernetes components inside the cluster. When you run an application on Kubernetes, you can see all the Kubernetes components on the terminal using kubectl commands. But when you use Argo, you can see them in a GUI. Not only that, you can connect your repository with Argo and through a single click, you can sync up your application with the latest changes. Either your project resides in a public or private repository, you can add that into the Argo CD and create a separate application using your repo. Argo CD supports for authentication so that your private repositories can be added safely using your credentials.

Apart from Argo CD’s nice GUI, it has other unique features which can facilitate your projects. Argo CD allows you to connect multiple Git repositories into a single cluster and also it has built-in support for 3rd-party tools such as kustomize, helm, ksonnet and etc. Argo CD has the auto-sync feature and once you enable it, your application will be synced up automatically [But when you need to update the container image version you need to first commit your changes to the repository].

In this article, I will be discussing how you can integrate Argo CD into your project which runs on Kubernetes.

Before starting you need to have kubectl (command-line tool for Kubernetes) installed on your computer. Also, you need to have an access to your Kubernetes cluster and it’d be easier if you have already created a repository for your project.

For this tutorial, I’m using a local Kubernetes cluster created through minikube and my repository resides in GitHub as a public repository.

If you need to install minikube on your computer to have a single node cluster, please refer the tutorial below.

kubernetes continuous-delivery programming devops argo

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