Visual Studio Code September 2019

Update 1.39.1: The update addresses these issues, including a fix for a security vulnerability.

Update 1.39.2: The update addresses these issues.

Downloads: Windows: User System | Mac | Linux: snap deb rpm tarball


Welcome to the September 2019 release of Visual Studio Code. There are a number of updates in this version that we hope you will like, some of the key highlights include:

If you’d like to read these release notes online, go to Updates on code.visualstudio.com.

Insiders: Want to see new features as soon as possible? You can download the nightly Insiders build and try the latest updates as soon as they are available. And for the latest Visual Studio Code news, updates, and content, follow us on Twitter @code!

Workbench

Updated Source Control view

The Source Control view has been updated to use the latest tree widget. You can now toggle between a list and a tree view with the Toggle View Mode button on the Source Control title bar.

Source Control toggle view mode button

You can change the default view using the scm.defaultViewMode setting, which takes the values list or tree.

You also now benefit from the automatic keyboard navigation and filtering of the updated tree widget by simply starting to type in the view.

Updated SCM view

When in tree view mode, which displays folders, the Git extension now contributes commands to folders, for example Stage Changes, which will be applied to all files within a folder.

Improved Trusted Domains setting

We simplified the management of trusted domains for the outgoing link protection feature introduced in the 1.38 release.

You can now use the command Manage Trusted Domains to easily add, remove, or modify trusted domains as a JSON text file.

Improved trusted domains management

Selectable completion details

Auto completion details can now be selected for copy and paste.

Selectable completion details

Updated Japanese UI font on Windows

On Windows, we have switched the Japanese UI typeface from Meiryo to Yu Gothic UI and Meiryo UI.

The UI typefaces save horizontal space by using narrower Japanese kana characters. You can use the Japanese UI by installing the Japanese Language Pack and, with the Configure Display Language command, setting the display language identifier to ja.

In the image below, you can see how the narrower UI typeface looks in the Insiders (green icon) menu bar.

Japanese typeface

Improved monospace typeface display in suggestions and hovers

Previously, the inline <code> segments in the suggestion and hover widgets didn’t specify font-family. On Windows / macOS, these segments were rendered with Chrome’s default choice for font-family: monospace.

In this iteration, we aligned them with the system sans-serif typefaces that are used throughout the VS Code UI.

  • Windows: Courier New -> Consolas (To align with Segoe UI)
  • macOS: Courier -> SF MonoMonacoMenlo (To align with SF Text and Helvetica Neue)
  • Linux: No change. Inline code segments still rendered in Liberation Mono, which is Chrome’s default for font-family: monospace on Linux.

Below you can see that SF Mono gives a more consistent appearance to the inline code blocks.

Suggest and Hover widgets monospace typeface

Validation for uniqueItems in the Settings editor

Validation for string array settings, which was introduced in the 1.38 release, now supports uniqueItems.

If using "uniqueItems": true, duplicate entries in the Settings editor will show a warning.

Code block highlighting in extension READMEs

Code blocks in extension READMEs, which are displayed in the Extensions view Details pane, are now highlighted in VS Code:

A block of JSON being highlighted

The highlighting uses the current color theme.

#visual studio code #css #html #python

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Visual Studio Code September 2019
Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1675304280

How to Use Hotwire Rails

Introduction

We are back with another exciting and much-talked-about Rails tutorial on how to use Hotwire with the Rails application. This Hotwire Rails tutorial is an alternate method for building modern web applications that consume a pinch of JavaScript.

Rails 7 Hotwire is the default front-end framework shipped with Rails 7 after it was launched. It is used to represent HTML over the wire in the Rails application. Previously, we used to add a hotwire-rails gem in our gem file and then run rails hotwire: install. However, with the introduction of Rails 7, the gem got deprecated. Now, we use turbo-rails and stimulus rails directly, which work as Hotwire’s SPA-like page accelerator and Hotwire’s modest JavaScript framework.

What is Hotwire?

Hotwire is a package of different frameworks that help to build applications. It simplifies the developer’s work for writing web pages without the need to write JavaScript, and instead sending HTML code over the wire.

Introduction to The Hotwire Framework:

1. Turbo:

It uses simplified techniques to build web applications while decreasing the usage of JavaScript in the application. Turbo offers numerous handling methods for the HTML data sent over the wire and displaying the application’s data without actually loading the entire page. It helps to maintain the simplicity of web applications without destroying the single-page application experience by using the below techniques:

Turbo Frames: Turbo Frames help to load the different sections of our markup without any dependency as it divides the page into different contexts separately called frames and updates these frames individually.
Turbo Drive: Every link doesn’t have to make the entire page reload when clicked. Only the HTML contained within the tag will be displayed.
Turbo Streams: To add real-time features to the application, this technique is used. It helps to bring real-time data to the application using CRUD actions.

2. Stimulus

It represents the JavaScript framework, which is required when JS is a requirement in the application. The interaction with the HTML is possible with the help of a stimulus, as the controllers that help those interactions are written by a stimulus.

3. Strada

Not much information is available about Strada as it has not been officially released yet. However, it works with native applications, and by using HTML bridge attributes, interaction is made possible between web applications and native apps.

Simple diagrammatic representation of Hotwire Stack:

Hotwire Stack

Prerequisites For Hotwire Rails Tutorial

As we are implementing the Ruby on Rails Hotwire tutorial, make sure about the following installations before you can get started.

  • Ruby on Rails
  • Hotwire gem
  • PostgreSQL/SQLite (choose any one database)
  • Turbo Rails
  • Stimulus.js

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Create a new Rails Project

Find the following commands to create a rails application.

mkdir ~/projects/railshotwire
cd ~/projects/railshotwire
echo "source 'https://rubygems.org'" > Gemfile
echo "gem 'rails', '~> 7.0.0'" >> Gemfile
bundle install  
bundle exec rails new . --force -d=postgresql

Now create some files for the project, up till now no usage of Rails Hotwire can be seen.
Fire the following command in your terminal.

  • For creating a default controller for the application
echo "class HomeController < ApplicationController" > app/controllers/home_controller.rb
echo "end" >> app/controllers/home_controller.rb
  • For creating another controller for the application
echo "class OtherController < ApplicationController" > app/controllers/other_controller.rb
echo "end" >> app/controllers/home_controller.rb
  • For creating routes for the application
echo "Rails.application.routes.draw do" > config/routes.rb
echo '  get "home/index"' >> config/routes.rb
echo '  get "other/index"' >> config/routes.rb
echo '  root to: "home#index"' >> config/routes.rb
echo 'end' >> config/routes.rb
  • For creating a default view for the application
mkdir app/views/home
echo '<h1>This is Rails Hotwire homepage</h1>' > app/views/home/index.html.erb
echo '<div><%= link_to "Enter to other page", other_index_path %></div>' >> app/views/home/index.html.erb
  • For creating another view for the application
mkdir app/views/other
echo '<h1>This is Another page</h1>' > app/views/other/index.html.erb
echo '<div><%= link_to "Enter to home page", root_path %></div>' >> app/views/other/index.html.erb
  • For creating a database and schema.rb file for the application
bin/rails db:create
bin/rails db:migrate
  • For checking the application run bin/rails s and open your browser, your running application will have the below view.

Rails Hotwire Home Page

Additionally, you can clone the code and browse through the project. Here’s the source code of the repository: Rails 7 Hotwire application

Now, let’s see how Hotwire Rails can work its magic with various Turbo techniques.

Hotwire Rails: Turbo Drive

Go to your localhost:3000 on your web browser and right-click on the Inspect and open a Network tab of the DevTools of the browser.

Now click on go to another page link that appears on the home page to redirect from the home page to another page. In our Network tab, we can see that this action of navigation is achieved via XHR. It appears only the part inside HTML is reloaded, here neither the CSS is reloaded nor the JS is reloaded when the navigation action is performed.

Hotwire Rails Turbo Drive

By performing this action we can see that Turbo Drive helps to represent the HTML response without loading the full page and only follows redirect and reindeer HTML responses which helps to make the application faster to access.

Hotwire Rails: Turbo Frame

This technique helps to divide the current page into different sections called frames that can be updated separately independently when new data is added from the server.
Below we discuss the different use cases of Turbo frame like inline edition, sorting, searching, and filtering of data.

Let’s perform some practical actions to see the example of these use cases.

Make changes in the app/controllers/home_controller.rb file

#CODE

class HomeController < ApplicationController
   def turbo_frame_form
   end
   
   def turbo_frame submit
      extracted_anynumber = params[:any][:anynumber]
      render :turbo_frame_form, status: :ok, locals: {anynumber: extracted_anynumber,      comment: 'turbo_frame_submit ok' }
   end
end

Turbo Frame

Add app/views/home/turbo_frame_form.html.erb file to the application and add this content inside the file.

#CODE

<section>

    <%= turbo_frame_tag 'anyframe' do %>
            
      <div>
          <h2>Frame view</h2>
          <%= form_with scope: :any, url: turbo_frame_submit_path, local: true do |form| %>
              <%= form.label :anynumber, 'Type an integer (odd or even)', 'class' => 'my-0  d-inline'  %>
              <%= form.text_field :anynumber, type: 'number', 'required' => 'true', 'value' => "#{local_assigns[:anynumber] || 0}",  'aria-describedby' => 'anynumber' %>
              <%= form.submit 'Submit this number', 'id' => 'submit-number' %>
          <% end %>
      </div>
      <div>
        <h2>Data of the view</h2>
        <pre style="font-size: .7rem;"><%= JSON.pretty_generate(local_assigns) %></pre> 
      </div>
      
    <% end %>

</section>

Add the content inside file

Make some adjustments in routes.rb

#CODE

Rails.application.routes.draw do
  get 'home/index'
  get 'other/index'

  get '/home/turbo_frame_form' => 'home#turbo_frame_form', as: 'turbo_frame_form'
  post '/home/turbo_frame_submit' => 'home#turbo_frame_submit', as: 'turbo_frame_submit'


  root to: "home#index"
end
  • Next step is to change homepage view in app/views/home/index.html.erb

#CODE

<h1>This is Rails Hotwire home page</h1>
<div><%= link_to "Enter to other page", other_index_path %></div>

<%= turbo_frame_tag 'anyframe' do %>        
  <div>
      <h2>Home view</h2>
      <%= form_with scope: :any, url: turbo_frame_submit_path, local: true do |form| %>
          <%= form.label :anynumber, 'Type an integer (odd or even)', 'class' => 'my-0  d-inline'  %>
          <%= form.text_field :anynumber, type: 'number', 'required' => 'true', 'value' => "#{local_assigns[:anynumber] || 0}",  'aria-describedby' => 'anynumber' %>
          <%= form.submit 'Submit this number', 'id' => 'submit-number' %>
      <% end %>
  <div>
<% end %>

Change HomePage

After making all the changes, restart the rails server and refresh the browser, the default view will appear on the browser.

restart the rails serverNow in the field enter any digit, after entering the digit click on submit button, and as the submit button is clicked we can see the Turbo Frame in action in the below screen, we can observe that the frame part changed, the first title and first link didn’t move.

submit button is clicked

Hotwire Rails: Turbo Streams

Turbo Streams deliver page updates over WebSocket, SSE or in response to form submissions by only using HTML and a series of CRUD-like operations, you are free to say that either

  • Update the piece of HTML while responding to all the other actions like the post, put, patch, and delete except the GET action.
  • Transmit a change to all users, without reloading the browser page.

This transmit can be represented by a simple example.

  • Make changes in app/controllers/other_controller.rb file of rails application

#CODE

class OtherController < ApplicationController

  def post_something
    respond_to do |format|
      format.turbo_stream {  }
    end
  end

   end

file of rails application

Add the below line in routes.rb file of the application

#CODE

post '/other/post_something' => 'other#post_something', as: 'post_something'
Add the below line

Superb! Rails will now attempt to locate the app/views/other/post_something.turbo_stream.erb template at any moment the ‘/other/post_something’ endpoint is reached.

For this, we need to add app/views/other/post_something.turbo_stream.erb template in the rails application.

#CODE

<turbo-stream action="append" target="messages">
  <template>
    <div id="message_1">This changes the existing message!</div>
  </template>
</turbo-stream>
Add template in the rails application

This states that the response will try to append the template of the turbo frame with ID “messages”.

Now change the index.html.erb file in app/views/other paths with the below content.

#CODE

<h1>This is Another page</h1>
<div><%= link_to "Enter to home page", root_path %></div>

<div style="margin-top: 3rem;">
  <%= form_with scope: :any, url: post_something_path do |form| %>
      <%= form.submit 'Post any message %>
  <% end %>
  <turbo-frame id="messages">
    <div>An empty message</div>
  </turbo-frame>
</div>
change the index.html.erb file
  • After making all the changes, restart the rails server and refresh the browser, and go to the other page.

go to the other page

  • Once the above screen appears, click on the Post any message button

Post any message button

This action shows that after submitting the response, the Turbo Streams help the developer to append the message, without reloading the page.

Another use case we can test is that rather than appending the message, the developer replaces the message. For that, we need to change the content of app/views/other/post_something.turbo_stream.erb template file and change the value of the action attribute from append to replace and check the changes in the browser.

#CODE

<turbo-stream action="replace" target="messages">
  <template>
    <div id="message_1">This changes the existing message!</div>
  </template>
</turbo-stream>

change the value of the action attributeWhen we click on Post any message button, the message that appear below that button will get replaced with the message that is mentioned in the app/views/other/post_something.turbo_stream.erb template

click on Post any message button

Stimulus

There are some cases in an application where JS is needed, therefore to cover those scenarios we require Hotwire JS tool. Hotwire has a JS tool because in some scenarios Turbo-* tools are not sufficient. But as we know that Hotwire is used to reduce the usage of JS in an application, Stimulus considers HTML as the single source of truth. Consider the case where we have to give elements on a page some JavaScript attributes, such as data controller, data-action, and data target. For that, a stimulus controller that can access elements and receive events based on those characteristics will be created.

Make a change in app/views/other/index.html.erb template file in rails application

#CODE

<h1>This is Another page</h1>
<div><%= link_to "Enter to home page", root_path %></div>

<div style="margin-top: 2rem;">
  <%= form_with scope: :any, url: post_something_path do |form| %>
      <%= form.submit 'Post something' %>
  <% end %>
  <turbo-frame id="messages">
    <div>An empty message</div>
  </turbo-frame>
</div>

<div style="margin-top: 2rem;">
  <h2>Stimulus</h2>  
  <div data-controller="hello">
    <input data-hello-target="name" type="text">
    <button data-action="click->hello#greet">
      Greet
    </button>
    <span data-hello-target="output">
    </span>
  </div>
</div>

Make A changeMake changes in the hello_controller.js in path app/JavaScript/controllers and add a stimulus controller in the file, which helps to bring the HTML into life.

#CODE

import { Controller } from "@hotwired/stimulus"

export default class extends Controller {
  static targets = [ "name", "output" ]

  greet() {
    this.outputTarget.textContent =
      `Hello, ${this.nameTarget.value}!`
  }
}

add a stimulus controller in the fileGo to your browser after making the changes in the code and click on Enter to other page link which will navigate to the localhost:3000/other/index page there you can see the changes implemented by the stimulus controller that is designed to augment your HTML with just enough behavior to make it more responsive.

With just a little bit of work, Turbo and Stimulus together offer a complete answer for applications that are quick and compelling.

Using Rails 7 Hotwire helps to load the pages at a faster speed and allows you to render templates on the server, where you have access to your whole domain model. It is a productive development experience in ROR, without compromising any of the speed or responsiveness associated with SPA.

Conclusion

We hope you were satisfied with our Rails Hotwire tutorial. Write to us at service@bacancy.com for any query that you want to resolve, or if you want us to share a tutorial on your query.

For more such solutions on RoR, check out our Ruby on Rails Tutorials. We will always strive to amaze you and cater to your needs.

Original article source at: https://www.bacancytechnology.com/

#rails #ruby 

COMO USAR e trabalhar com Code Review no Visual Studio Code

Não é todo programador que gosta de compartilhar o seu trabalho ou até mesmo receber feedbacks de como o seu código foi escrito, mas o Code Review é cada vez mais comum em empresas do mundo todo.

Conheça uma extensão para Visual Studio Code e comece a trabalhar com Code Review em seu próximo projeto. Essa é a sua chance de saber COMO USAR e trabalhar com Code Review no Visual Studio Code.

#visual studio code #code review #visual studio #code

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1595337660

Visual Studio 2019 v16.7 Preview 2 Available Today!

C++ Updates

Visual Studio v16.7 Preview 2 delivers various improvements in the C++ space. Within the Connection Manager, you’re now able to edit remote SSH connections, e.g. if the IP address of your target system changes and needs to be updated. You’re also able to set default remote connections to be consumed via **${defaultRemoteMachineName} **in CMakeSettings.json and launch.vs.json.

When you edit a remote connection, Visual Studio will no longer need to recopy headers to Windows for a native IntelliSense experience. Likewise, setting default remote connections is useful for checking CMakeSettings.json and launch.vs.json into source control with no user or machine-specific information. These remote connections over SSH allow you to build and debug your C++ projects on a remote Linux system directly from Visual Studio.

CPP Add or Remove SSH Connections

C++ Add or Remove SSH Connections with Connection Manager

This release also brings enhanced IntelliSense support for Clang on Windows (clang-cl) in Visual Studio. The clang include path now includes the clang libraries, we’ve improved the display of in-editor squiggles (particularly when using the std library), and we’ve added support for C++2a is supported in clang mode.

The Preview release also contains four new code analysis rules to incorporate additional safety features into C++: C26817C26818C26819, and C26820. Please see the C++ Team Blog for more info.

In addition, new C++20 Standard Library features have been implemented. A detailed list is provided in the STL Changelog on GitHub.

.NET Productivity

Quick Info now displays the diagnostic ID along with a help link where you can easily navigate to our documentation to learn more about warnings and errors in your code.

Diagnostic ID with help links in .NET Productivity

Diagnostic ID with help links in .NET Productivity

Git Productivity

We continue to release more Git functionality in Visual Studio 2019. This time we focus on merge conflict resolution. We’ve revamped the Visual Studio merge editor by decoupling it from TFVC and focusing it on Git.

A new gold info bar at the top of a file will tell you when there are merge conflicts that need to be manually resolved. Clicking will take you to the merge editor, which now has more informative tiles and captions to help you distinguish between the conflicting branches. We’ve reduced the clutter around the zoom margin, health margin, and the toolbar. In addition, it is easier to parse conflicts with aligned matching lines, word level differences, and visible whitespace when it is the only difference. You can turn off non-conflicting differences to just focus on the conflicts. You can also resolve add/add conflicts at the file level now with a two-way merge. Finally, we have added a checkbox to resolve all conflicts on one side or the other with a single click.

Try the new features by toggling the Preview Feature for New Git user experience in Tools > Options.

Improved Git Functionality in Visual Studio 2019 under the Tools Menu

Improved Git Functionality in Visual Studio 2019 under the Tools Menu

In other Git improvements, we will now close any open folders or solutions before starting a new clone operation, so that Visual Studio can open the newly cloned repo to help you get to your code faster. We’ve improved upon the commit text box, adding inline error checking. And we’ve added UI to help you more clearly understand what is happening when you initialize and push a repository to a remote host like GitHub or Azure Repos.

Local Process with Kubernetes

Local Process with Kubernetes allows you to write, test and debug your .NET code on your development workstation while connected to your Kubernetes cluster with the rest of your application or services. By connecting your development workstation to your cluster, you eliminate the need to manually run and configure dependent services on your development machine. Environment variables, connection strings and volumes from the cluster are available to your microservice code running locally.

For more information on Local Process with Kubernetes, we have detailed it out in our team blog.

#visual studio #announcement #visual studio 2019 #visual studio code

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1596975120

Writing Visual Studio Extensions with Mads - Episode 1: Item Templates

Join Mads Kristensen from the Visual Studio team each week as he builds extensions for Visual Studio live!

#visual studio code #visual studio #code #microsoft #visual studio extensions

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1597032000

User Snippets (Code Shortcuts) in Visual Studio Code

Hello, my friends and fellow developers, this video is all about User Snippets. That means the Snippets (Code Shortcuts) that you can make for yourself. It is a really amazing feature. I hope you like this video

Let me know in the comments below if you want more Visual Studio Code videos or any other videos. And like the video, if you like it.

#visual studio code #visual studio #code