Let’s Dive Into Data Preprocessing

Living in this modern age, we face thousands of data every day. When we start our day by waking up in the morning, the first thing we do for most of us is to check the smartphone to see “is there an important email that I haven’t read?” or we check our social media to see “is my friend having a birthday today?” or do we check the news on the smartphone to see “what’s hot today?” Those are all examples of the application of data. Can you imagine if you face raw data that has not been processed before?

WHAT IS DATA PREPROCESSING

>

“A simple definition could be that data preprocessing is a data mining technique to turn the raw data gathered from diverse sources into cleaner information that’s more suitable for work. In other words, it’s a preliminary step that takes all of the available information to organize it, sort it, and merge it.”

Raw data can have missing or inconsistent values as well as present a lot of redundant information. The most common problems you can find with raw data can be divided into 3 groups:

· Missing data: you can also see this as inaccurate data since the information that isn’t there creates gaps that might be relevant to the final analysis. Missing data often appears when there’s a problem in the collection phase, such as a glitch that caused a system’s downtime, mistakes in data entry, or issues with biometrics use, among others.

· Noisy data: this group encompasses erroneous data and outliers that you can find in the data set but that is just meaningless information. Here you can see noise made of human mistakes, rare exceptions, mislabels, and other issues during data gathering.

· Inconsistent data: inconsistencies happen when you keep files with similar data in different formats and files. Duplicates in different formats, mistakes in codes of names, or the absence of data constraints often lead to inconsistent data, that introduces deviations that you have to deal with before analysis.

If you didn’t take care of those issues, the final output would be plagued with faulty insights. That’s especially true for more sensitive analysis that can be more affected by small mistakes, like when it’s used in new fields where minimal variations in raw data can lead to wrong assumptions.


WHY WE NEED DATA PROCESSING

By now, you’ve surely realized why your data preprocessing is so important. Since mistakes, redundancies, missing values, and inconsistencies all compromise the integrity of the set, you need to fix all those issues for a more accurate outcome. Imagine you are training a Machine Learning algorithm to deal with your customers’ purchases with a faulty dataset. Chances are that the system will develop biases and deviations that will produce a poor user experience.

Thus, before using that data for the purpose you want, you need it to be as organized and “clean” as possible. There are several ways to do so, depending on what kind of problem you’re tackling. Ideally, you’d use all of the following techniques to get a better data set. This picture below will help you to understand the steps you can do in Data Preprocessing.

#machine-learning #data-transformation #data-preprocessing #data-reduction #data-cleaning #data analysis

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Let’s Dive Into Data Preprocessing
 iOS App Dev

iOS App Dev

1620466520

Your Data Architecture: Simple Best Practices for Your Data Strategy

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you should probably think about your data architecture and possible best practices.

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you most probably need to think about your data architecture and consider possible best practices. Gaining a competitive edge, remaining customer-centric to the greatest extent possible, and streamlining processes to get on-the-button outcomes can all be traced back to an organization’s capacity to build a future-ready data architecture.

In what follows, we offer a short overview of the overarching capabilities of data architecture. These include user-centricity, elasticity, robustness, and the capacity to ensure the seamless flow of data at all times. Added to these are automation enablement, plus security and data governance considerations. These points from our checklist for what we perceive to be an anticipatory analytics ecosystem.

#big data #data science #big data analytics #data analysis #data architecture #data transformation #data platform #data strategy #cloud data platform #data acquisition

Let’s Dive Into Data Preprocessing

Living in this modern age, we face thousands of data every day. When we start our day by waking up in the morning, the first thing we do for most of us is to check the smartphone to see “is there an important email that I haven’t read?” or we check our social media to see “is my friend having a birthday today?” or do we check the news on the smartphone to see “what’s hot today?” Those are all examples of the application of data. Can you imagine if you face raw data that has not been processed before?

WHAT IS DATA PREPROCESSING

>

“A simple definition could be that data preprocessing is a data mining technique to turn the raw data gathered from diverse sources into cleaner information that’s more suitable for work. In other words, it’s a preliminary step that takes all of the available information to organize it, sort it, and merge it.”

Raw data can have missing or inconsistent values as well as present a lot of redundant information. The most common problems you can find with raw data can be divided into 3 groups:

· Missing data: you can also see this as inaccurate data since the information that isn’t there creates gaps that might be relevant to the final analysis. Missing data often appears when there’s a problem in the collection phase, such as a glitch that caused a system’s downtime, mistakes in data entry, or issues with biometrics use, among others.

· Noisy data: this group encompasses erroneous data and outliers that you can find in the data set but that is just meaningless information. Here you can see noise made of human mistakes, rare exceptions, mislabels, and other issues during data gathering.

· Inconsistent data: inconsistencies happen when you keep files with similar data in different formats and files. Duplicates in different formats, mistakes in codes of names, or the absence of data constraints often lead to inconsistent data, that introduces deviations that you have to deal with before analysis.

If you didn’t take care of those issues, the final output would be plagued with faulty insights. That’s especially true for more sensitive analysis that can be more affected by small mistakes, like when it’s used in new fields where minimal variations in raw data can lead to wrong assumptions.


WHY WE NEED DATA PROCESSING

By now, you’ve surely realized why your data preprocessing is so important. Since mistakes, redundancies, missing values, and inconsistencies all compromise the integrity of the set, you need to fix all those issues for a more accurate outcome. Imagine you are training a Machine Learning algorithm to deal with your customers’ purchases with a faulty dataset. Chances are that the system will develop biases and deviations that will produce a poor user experience.

Thus, before using that data for the purpose you want, you need it to be as organized and “clean” as possible. There are several ways to do so, depending on what kind of problem you’re tackling. Ideally, you’d use all of the following techniques to get a better data set. This picture below will help you to understand the steps you can do in Data Preprocessing.

#machine-learning #data-transformation #data-preprocessing #data-reduction #data-cleaning #data analysis

Gerhard  Brink

Gerhard Brink

1620629020

Getting Started With Data Lakes

Frameworks for Efficient Enterprise Analytics

The opportunities big data offers also come with very real challenges that many organizations are facing today. Often, it’s finding the most cost-effective, scalable way to store and process boundless volumes of data in multiple formats that come from a growing number of sources. Then organizations need the analytical capabilities and flexibility to turn this data into insights that can meet their specific business objectives.

This Refcard dives into how a data lake helps tackle these challenges at both ends — from its enhanced architecture that’s designed for efficient data ingestion, storage, and management to its advanced analytics functionality and performance flexibility. You’ll also explore key benefits and common use cases.

Introduction

As technology continues to evolve with new data sources, such as IoT sensors and social media churning out large volumes of data, there has never been a better time to discuss the possibilities and challenges of managing such data for varying analytical insights. In this Refcard, we dig deep into how data lakes solve the problem of storing and processing enormous amounts of data. While doing so, we also explore the benefits of data lakes, their use cases, and how they differ from data warehouses (DWHs).


This is a preview of the Getting Started With Data Lakes Refcard. To read the entire Refcard, please download the PDF from the link above.

#big data #data analytics #data analysis #business analytics #data warehouse #data storage #data lake #data lake architecture #data lake governance #data lake management

Mike  Kozey

Mike Kozey

1656151740

Test_cov_console: Flutter Console Coverage Test

Flutter Console Coverage Test

This small dart tools is used to generate Flutter Coverage Test report to console

How to install

Add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dev_dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

How to run

run the following command to make sure all flutter library is up-to-date

flutter pub get
Running "flutter pub get" in coverage...                            0.5s

run the following command to generate lcov.info on coverage directory

flutter test --coverage
00:02 +1: All tests passed!

run the tool to generate report from lcov.info

flutter pub run test_cov_console
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
 print_cov_constants.dart                    |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Optional parameter

If not given a FILE, "coverage/lcov.info" will be used.
-f, --file=<FILE>                      The target lcov.info file to be reported
-e, --exclude=<STRING1,STRING2,...>    A list of contains string for files without unit testing
                                       to be excluded from report
-l, --line                             It will print Lines & Uncovered Lines only
                                       Branch & Functions coverage percentage will not be printed
-i, --ignore                           It will not print any file without unit testing
-m, --multi                            Report from multiple lcov.info files
-c, --csv                              Output to CSV file
-o, --output=<CSV-FILE>                Full path of output CSV file
                                       If not given, "coverage/test_cov_console.csv" will be used
-t, --total                            Print only the total coverage
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-p, --pass=<MINIMUM>                   Print only the whether total coverage is passed MINIMUM value or not
                                       If the value >= MINIMUM, it will print PASSED, otherwise FAILED
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-h, --help                             Show this help

example run the tool with parameters

flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

report for multiple lcov.info files (-m, --multi)

It support to run for multiple lcov.info files with the followings directory structures:
1. No root module
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
2. With root module
<root>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/lib/src
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
You must run test_cov_console on <root> dir, and the report would be grouped by module, here is
the sample output for directory structure 'with root module':
flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock --multi
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_a -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_b -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Output to CSV file (-c, --csv, -o, --output)

flutter pub run test_cov_console -c --output=coverage/test_coverage.csv

#### sample CSV output file:
File,% Branch,% Funcs,% Lines,Uncovered Line #s
lib/,,,,
test_cov_console.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
lib/src/,,,,
parser.dart,100.00,100.00,97.22,"97"
parser_constants.dart,100.00,100.00,100.00,""
print_cov.dart,100.00,100.00,82.91,"29,49,51,52,171,174,177,180,183,184,185,186,187,188,279,324,325,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,398"
print_cov_constants.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
All files with unit testing,100.00,100.00,86.07,""

Installing

Use this package as an executable

Install it

You can install the package from the command line:

dart pub global activate test_cov_console

Use it

The package has the following executables:

$ test_cov_console

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Dart:

 $ dart pub add test_cov_console

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add test_cov_console

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):

dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

Alternatively, your editor might support dart pub get or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:test_cov_console/test_cov_console.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(MyApp());
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  // This widget is the root of your application.
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      theme: ThemeData(
        // This is the theme of your application.
        //
        // Try running your application with "flutter run". You'll see the
        // application has a blue toolbar. Then, without quitting the app, try
        // changing the primarySwatch below to Colors.green and then invoke
        // "hot reload" (press "r" in the console where you ran "flutter run",
        // or simply save your changes to "hot reload" in a Flutter IDE).
        // Notice that the counter didn't reset back to zero; the application
        // is not restarted.
        primarySwatch: Colors.blue,
        // This makes the visual density adapt to the platform that you run
        // the app on. For desktop platforms, the controls will be smaller and
        // closer together (more dense) than on mobile platforms.
        visualDensity: VisualDensity.adaptivePlatformDensity,
      ),
      home: MyHomePage(title: 'Flutter Demo Home Page'),
    );
  }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget {
  MyHomePage({Key? key, required this.title}) : super(key: key);

  // This widget is the home page of your application. It is stateful, meaning
  // that it has a State object (defined below) that contains fields that affect
  // how it looks.

  // This class is the configuration for the state. It holds the values (in this
  // case the title) provided by the parent (in this case the App widget) and
  // used by the build method of the State. Fields in a Widget subclass are
  // always marked "final".

  final String title;

  @override
  _MyHomePageState createState() => _MyHomePageState();
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  int _counter = 0;

  void _incrementCounter() {
    setState(() {
      // This call to setState tells the Flutter framework that something has
      // changed in this State, which causes it to rerun the build method below
      // so that the display can reflect the updated values. If we changed
      // _counter without calling setState(), then the build method would not be
      // called again, and so nothing would appear to happen.
      _counter++;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    // This method is rerun every time setState is called, for instance as done
    // by the _incrementCounter method above.
    //
    // The Flutter framework has been optimized to make rerunning build methods
    // fast, so that you can just rebuild anything that needs updating rather
    // than having to individually change instances of widgets.
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        // Here we take the value from the MyHomePage object that was created by
        // the App.build method, and use it to set our appbar title.
        title: Text(widget.title),
      ),
      body: Center(
        // Center is a layout widget. It takes a single child and positions it
        // in the middle of the parent.
        child: Column(
          // Column is also a layout widget. It takes a list of children and
          // arranges them vertically. By default, it sizes itself to fit its
          // children horizontally, and tries to be as tall as its parent.
          //
          // Invoke "debug painting" (press "p" in the console, choose the
          // "Toggle Debug Paint" action from the Flutter Inspector in Android
          // Studio, or the "Toggle Debug Paint" command in Visual Studio Code)
          // to see the wireframe for each widget.
          //
          // Column has various properties to control how it sizes itself and
          // how it positions its children. Here we use mainAxisAlignment to
          // center the children vertically; the main axis here is the vertical
          // axis because Columns are vertical (the cross axis would be
          // horizontal).
          mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
          children: <Widget>[
            Text(
              'You have pushed the button this many times:',
            ),
            Text(
              '$_counter',
              style: Theme.of(context).textTheme.headline4,
            ),
          ],
        ),
      ),
      floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
        onPressed: _incrementCounter,
        tooltip: 'Increment',
        child: Icon(Icons.add),
      ), // This trailing comma makes auto-formatting nicer for build methods.
    );
  }
}

Author: DigitalKatalis
Source Code: https://github.com/DigitalKatalis/test_cov_console 
License: BSD-3-Clause license

#flutter #dart #test 

Data Preprocessing — An important stage that is ignored by masses

The genius in the world of science Albert Einstein once quoted :

“If you are given a problem to solve in 60 minutes then spend 55 minutes defining the problem and spend the next 5 minutes solving it.”

Well, whatever I did to date in the subject of Data Science, I would like to reframe the quote in a changed version for now as below:

“If you are given a dataset to perform analysis to create visualization and later apply the algorithms to train the models to generate the best performance, then spend most of the time in Data Preprocessing techniques to get cleaner and correct data.”

#data-preprocess #data-cleaning #data-analysis #data-preprocessing #data-mining