Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

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Ever Wondered Why We Use Containers In DevOps?

At some point we’ve all said the words, “But it works on my machine.” It usually happens during testing or when you’re trying to get a new project set up. Sometimes it happens when you pull down changes from an updated branch.

Every machine has different underlying states depending on the operating system, other installed programs, and permissions. Getting a project to run locally could take hours or even days because of weird system issues.

The worst part is that this can also happen in production. If the server is configured differently than what you’re running locally, your changes might not work as you expect and cause problems for users. There’s a way around all of these common issues using containers.

What is a container

A container is a piece of software that packages code and its dependencies so that the application can run in any computing environment. They basically create a little unit that you can put on any operating system and reliably and consistently run the application. You don’t have to worry about any of those underlying system issues creeping in later.

Although containers were already used in Linux for years, they became more popular in recent years. Most of the time when people are talking about containers, they’re referring to Docker containers. These containers are built from images that include all of the dependencies needed to run an application.

When you think of containers, virtual machines might also come to mind. They are very similar, but the big difference is that containers virtualize the operating system instead of the hardware. That’s what makes them so easy to run on all of the operating systems consistently.

What containers have to do with DevOps

Since we know how odd happenings occur when you move code from one computing environment to another, this is also a common issue with moving code to the different environments in our DevOps process. You don’t want to have to deal with system differences between staging and production. That would require more work than it should.

Once you have an artifact built, you should be able to use it in any environment from local to production. That’s the reason we use containers in DevOps. It’s also invaluable when you’re working with microservices. Docker containers used with something like Kubernetes will make it easier for you to handle larger systems with more moving pieces.

#devops #containers #containers-devops #devops-containers #devops-tools #devops-docker #docker #docker-image

Docker manifest - A peek into image's manifest.json files

docker manifest – An experimental feature !

The image manifest provides a configuration and a set of layers for a container image.

This is an experimental feature. To enable this feature in the Docker CLI, one can edit the config.json file found in ~/.docker/config.json like :

{
        "auths": {
                "https://index.docker.io/v1/": {
                        "auth": "XXXXXXX"
                }
        },
        "HttpHeaders": {
                "User-Agent": "Docker-Client/19.03.8 (linux)"
        },
        "experimental": "enabled",
        "debug": true
}

What is ‘docker manifest’ ?

The docker manifest command does not work independently to perform any action. In order to work with the docker manifest or manifest list, we use sub-commands along with it. This manifest sub-command can enable us to interact with the image manifests. Furthermore, it also gives information about the OS and the architecture, that a particular image was built for.

A single manifest comprises of information about an image, it’s size, the layers and digest.

A manifest list is a list of image layers (manifests) that are, created by specifying one or more image names. It can then be used in the same way as an image name in docker pull and docker run commands.

Commands to get started with :

After enabling this feature, one would be able to access the following command :

docker-manifest-enter image description here

These commands are easy to use. It basically avoids the need for pulling and running and then testing the images locally, from a docker registry.

Next, to inspect an image manifest, follow this syntax,

 docker manifest inspect image-name

enter image description here

.

#devops #docker #devops #docker #docker learning #docker-image

Jeevi Academy

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7 Best Chrome Extensions for UI/UX Designers | Jeevisoft |

#chromeextension #chrome #extension #ux #uxbook #contentmarketing #design #principles #gooddesign ##ui #userinterface #services #academy #userflow #userjourney #devops #automation #designer #gestalt #ux #designer #skills #interviewquestions #aws #docker#interviewquestions #interview #aws #scenario #cheatsheet #solutionarchitect #azure #ansibleinterview #questions #Devops #interview #guideline #Terraform #cheatsheet #interview #steps #localbusiness #business #videocreating #containor #devops #interview #opportunities #findabestway #certification #top #digitalmarketing #seo #mail #ppc #socialmediamarketing #shorts #technology #frontend #developer #youtube#programming #learn #tech #technology #trending #beginners #worldnews #creative #knowledge #academy #shorts #youtubeshorts #youtube #aws #docker #ui #website #webdesign #development #developer 

How to use Docker with Node.js a step-by-step Tutorial

Both Docker and Node.js have risen in popularity in the past 5 years. Running Node.js on docker containers with docker-compose for local development is a great experience.

In this step-by-step tutorial, we will look at how Node.js docker and docker-compose with multi-stage docker build work in sync. Time to get cracking.

#nodejs #docker-compose #nodejs-tutorial #docker

How to Extend your DevOps Strategy For Success in the Cloud?

DevOps and Cloud computing are joined at the hip, now that fact is well appreciated by the organizations that engaged in SaaS cloud and developed applications in the Cloud. During the COVID crisis period, most of the organizations have started using cloud computing services and implementing a cloud-first strategy to establish their remote operations. Similarly, the extended DevOps strategy will make the development process more agile with automated test cases.

According to the survey in EMEA, IT decision-makers have observed a 129%* improvement in the overall software development process when performing DevOps on the Cloud. This success result was just 81% when practicing only DevOps and 67%* when leveraging Cloud without DevOps. Not only that, but the practice has also made the software predictability better, improve the customer experience as well as speed up software delivery 2.6* times faster.

3 Core Principle to fit DevOps Strategy

If you consider implementing DevOps in concert with the Cloud, then the

below core principle will guide you to utilize the strategy.

  • It is indispensable to follow a continuous process, including all stages from Dev to deploy with the help of auto-provisioning resources of the target platform.
  • The team always keeps an eye on major and minor application changes that can typically appear within a few hours of development to operation. However, the support of unlimited resource provisioning is needed at the stage of deployment.
  • Cloud or hybrid configuration can associate this process, but you must confirm that configuration should support multiple cloud brands like Microsoft, AWS, Google, any public and private cloud models.

Guide to Remold Business with DevOps and Cloud

Companies are now re-inventing themselves to become better at sensing the next big thing their customers need and finding ways with the Cloud based DevOps to get ahead of the competition.

#devops #devops-principles #azure-devops #devops-transformation #good-company #devops-tools #devops-top-story #devops-infrastructure