Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1623896700

Guide to Contributing to Jakarta EE 10

This high-level guide outlines some possibilities for Jakarta EE 10 as well as how you can contribute.

Java EE has been transferred to the Eclipse Foundation and Jakarta EE 9.1 is behind us. The next step in the journey is Jakarta EE 10. This write-up outlines some possibilities for Jakarta EE 10 as well as how you can contribute.

Ways of Contributing

There are many ways of contributing to Jakarta EE 10, depending on what your time and interest allow. You can always start simple and get more engaged over time.

  • You can simply follow a Jakarta EE technology that interests you. The easiest way to do that is by subscribing to its mailing list. All the Jakarta mailing lists are available here. We specifically link the mailing lists for some likely key Jakarta EE 10 technologies below. You should feel free to join discussions that interest you. Contributing your opinion as an end-user is one of the most valuable things you can do.
  • If you have a specific feature you would like to advocate for, you should do so on the mailing list to start with. It may be necessary to record an issue detailing the feature if it does not already exist. Each project has a GitHub repository where you can record issues. You should be able to find the issue tracker for projects from here. We specifically link the issue trackers for some likely key Jakarta EE 10 technologies below.
  • If you want to help implement a change in the technology, you should look through the issue trackers and ask to pick up an issue on the mailing list. You can contribute an API change, a TCK change, or a change in one of the technology implementations (such as GlassFishJerseyMojarraOpenMQ, or EclipseLink). Providing a proof-of-concept if you can is a great way to advocate for change (although this is clearly not an expectation from everyone).
  • If you are unsure where to start, just get on a mailing list, introduce yourself and say you want to help. There should be a Jakarta EE Ambassador present to engage you. You can also reach out through the Jakarta EE Ambassadors Google Group.

#java #java ee #jakarta ee #jakarta ee 10 #guide to contributing to jakarta ee 10

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Guide to Contributing to Jakarta EE 10
Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1623896700

Guide to Contributing to Jakarta EE 10

This high-level guide outlines some possibilities for Jakarta EE 10 as well as how you can contribute.

Java EE has been transferred to the Eclipse Foundation and Jakarta EE 9.1 is behind us. The next step in the journey is Jakarta EE 10. This write-up outlines some possibilities for Jakarta EE 10 as well as how you can contribute.

Ways of Contributing

There are many ways of contributing to Jakarta EE 10, depending on what your time and interest allow. You can always start simple and get more engaged over time.

  • You can simply follow a Jakarta EE technology that interests you. The easiest way to do that is by subscribing to its mailing list. All the Jakarta mailing lists are available here. We specifically link the mailing lists for some likely key Jakarta EE 10 technologies below. You should feel free to join discussions that interest you. Contributing your opinion as an end-user is one of the most valuable things you can do.
  • If you have a specific feature you would like to advocate for, you should do so on the mailing list to start with. It may be necessary to record an issue detailing the feature if it does not already exist. Each project has a GitHub repository where you can record issues. You should be able to find the issue tracker for projects from here. We specifically link the issue trackers for some likely key Jakarta EE 10 technologies below.
  • If you want to help implement a change in the technology, you should look through the issue trackers and ask to pick up an issue on the mailing list. You can contribute an API change, a TCK change, or a change in one of the technology implementations (such as GlassFishJerseyMojarraOpenMQ, or EclipseLink). Providing a proof-of-concept if you can is a great way to advocate for change (although this is clearly not an expectation from everyone).
  • If you are unsure where to start, just get on a mailing list, introduce yourself and say you want to help. There should be a Jakarta EE Ambassador present to engage you. You can also reach out through the Jakarta EE Ambassadors Google Group.

#java #java ee #jakarta ee #jakarta ee 10 #guide to contributing to jakarta ee 10

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623309913

Deploying Jakarta EE 9 applications to WildFly

WildFly 22.0.0.Alph1 provides a standalone preview distribution for Jakarta EE 9.

Prerequisites

Make sure you have installed the following software.

  • Java 8 or Java 11
  • Apache Maven 3.6
  • WildFly 22.0.0.Alpha1 Jakarta EE 9 preview

Go to the WildFly Download page, and make sure you are downloading the Jakarta EE 9 preview version.

Get the source codes from my github.

#jboss #java-ee #java #jakarta-ee #wildfly #deploying jakarta ee 9 applications to wildfly

Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1623889020

Jakarta EE/MicroProfile Alignment Survey Results!

The results of the Jakarta EE/MicroProfile alignment survey are summarized here.

As you are likely aware, Java EE has transitioned to Open Source governance in the Eclipse Foundation as Jakarta EE. MicroProfile has been moving forward as an independent initiative to optimize enterprise Java for microservices architectures. The Cloud Native for Java (CN4J) Alliance has recently been formed to promote better alignment between Jakarta EE and MicroProfile.

One of the key issues to sort out is how Jakarta EE can consume MicroProfile specifications (such as MicroProfile Configuration). There are several alternatives as to how this could be done. These alternatives were put into a survey for the community to weigh in. In addition to choosing the option respondents believe to be best, they were able to provide comments justifying their preferred alternative. The results of the survey are summarized here. The results have been shared with the CN4J community and key decision-makers.

#java #java ee #jakarta ee #microprofile #jakarta ee/microprofile alignment survey results! #microprofile alignment

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623401520

Testing Jakarta EE 9 Applications with Arquillian and Glassfish v6

Arquillian added a new module Arquillian Container Glassfish6 to align with the changes of Jakarta EE 9 and the features introduced in the Arquillian Core 1.7.0.

Arquillian Container Glassfish6 is designated to run tests on Glassfish v6, which is a full-featured Jakarta EE 9 compatible application server, so you can test all Jakarta EE 9 components using this new Arquillian Glassfish container.

In this post, we will try to run the our tests on the Glassfish container using both managed and remote adapters.

  • When using the managed adapter, Arquillian has ability to manage lifecycle of Glassfish server,eg. start and stop the container during the testing execution.
  • When using the remote adapter, Arquillian will try to run tests against a remote container, and gather the testing report through a proxy and send back to clients(IDE, Maven command console, etc.).

Note: The original Aruqillian Glassfish embedded container is not ported to the latest Glassfish v6 now.

Prerequisites

Note: Make sure you are using Java 8, Glassfish v6.0 does not support Java 11. Glassfish v6.1 will focus on Java 11 support.

#glassfish #arquillian #java #jakarta #java-ee #testing jakarta ee 9 applications with arquillian and glassfish v6

Kolby  Wyman

Kolby Wyman

1596189240

Understanding Jakarta EE 8 - CDI

The fundamental purpose of a software developer is to write code that is:

  • Easily maintainable and testable.
  • Loosely Coupled.
  • Easily extensible.

Building a distributed Java enterprise application required huge understanding in wiring various mainstream technologies across various application tiers, tying web controllers to database backend through a series of application and business services. This made it difficult to achieve the points highlighted above, making it a huge learning curve for developers to do what they do best: to write code.

Context and Dependency Injection (C.D.I) is one such technology that was introduced in Java EE 6 (JSR 299), with the goal to help knit the web tier with the transactional tier.

The Jakarta EE 8 CDI specification version is CDI 2.0, which is an update to CDI 1.2 (JSR 346).

Dependency Injection

According to Wikipedia:

In software engineering, dependency injection is a technique in which

an object receives other objects that it depends on. These other

objects are called dependencies. In the typical “using” relationship

the receiving object is called a client and the passed (that is,

“injected”) object is called a service.

Dependency Injection helps eliminate the need of hard-coding dependencies (object creation and instantiation), thus making our application loosely coupled, maintanable, extendable, and easier to test. With CDI, dependency resolution is done on runtime. The DI container (the injector) is responsible for injecting dependent beans.

#java (programming lang... #jakarta ee #cdi 2.0 #jakarta ee 8 #java