Amelia Smith

1628576217

Follow Six Steps Connect MySQL To EC2 Instance From Ubuntu

In this short article, we look out the steps to connect MySQL To EC2 but before moving to its steps, let's start with its short introduction. 

MYSQL is an open-source relational database management system that offers easy-to-use functions with scalability. Moreover, it uses relational DB and SQL structured query language for managing its data.  

AWS EC2 is the elastic compute cloud and is a popular Amazon service provider that gives the ability to run the application on a public cloud. It provides reliable, safe, and resizable cloud capacity with very few obstacles.  

So, after the short introduction, we move to six steps to connect MySQL to EC2.

Step 1: 

Update System Packages and Install MySQL

Step 2: 

Configure MySQL Installation

Step 3: 

Login into MySQL and Create a User

Step 4:

 Grant Access Privileges to User

Step 5: 

Connect User with MySQL

Step 6: 

Restart MySQL Service


So, above are the steps to set up MySQL in EC2 Ubuntu Instance. For more detailed steps with code and detailed procedure, read one of the excellent blogs on Connect MySQL to EC2; this blog will guide you with the successful setup.

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Joe  Hoppe

Joe Hoppe

1595905879

Best MySQL DigitalOcean Performance – ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean Managed Databases

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MySQL is the all-time number one open source database in the world, and a staple in RDBMS space. DigitalOcean is quickly building its reputation as the developers cloud by providing an affordable, flexible and easy to use cloud platform for developers to work with. MySQL on DigitalOcean is a natural fit, but what’s the best way to deploy your cloud database? In this post, we are going to compare the top two providers, DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL vs. ScaleGrid MySQL hosting on DigitalOcean.

At a glance – TLDR
ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 1st pointCompare Throughput
ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 2nd pointCompare Latency
On average, ScaleGrid achieves almost 30% lower latency over DigitalOcean for the same deployment configurations. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 3rd pointCompare Pricing
ScaleGrid provides 30% more storage on average vs. DigitalOcean for MySQL at the same affordable price. Read now

MySQL DigitalOcean Performance Benchmark
In this benchmark, we compare equivalent plan sizes between ScaleGrid MySQL on DigitalOcean and DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL. We are going to use a common, popular plan size using the below configurations for this performance benchmark:

Comparison Overview
ScaleGridDigitalOceanInstance TypeMedium: 4 vCPUsMedium: 4 vCPUsMySQL Version8.0.208.0.20RAM8GB8GBSSD140GB115GBDeployment TypeStandaloneStandaloneRegionSF03SF03SupportIncludedBusiness-level support included with account sizes over $500/monthMonthly Price$120$120

As you can see above, ScaleGrid and DigitalOcean offer the same plan configurations across this plan size, apart from SSD where ScaleGrid provides over 20% more storage for the same price.

To ensure the most accurate results in our performance tests, we run the benchmark four times for each comparison to find the average performance across throughput and latency over read-intensive workloads, balanced workloads, and write-intensive workloads.

Throughput
In this benchmark, we measure MySQL throughput in terms of queries per second (QPS) to measure our query efficiency. To quickly summarize the results, we display read-intensive, write-intensive and balanced workload averages below for 150 threads for ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean MySQL:

ScaleGrid MySQL vs DigitalOcean Managed Databases - Throughput Performance Graph

For the common 150 thread comparison, ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads.

#cloud #database #developer #digital ocean #mysql #performance #scalegrid #95th percentile latency #balanced workloads #developers cloud #digitalocean droplet #digitalocean managed databases #digitalocean performance #digitalocean pricing #higher throughput #latency benchmark #lower latency #mysql benchmark setup #mysql client threads #mysql configuration #mysql digitalocean #mysql latency #mysql on digitalocean #mysql throughput #performance benchmark #queries per second #read-intensive #scalegrid mysql #scalegrid vs. digitalocean #throughput benchmark #write-intensive

Chet  Lubowitz

Chet Lubowitz

1595429220

How to Install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04

Microsoft Teams is a communication platform used for Chat, Calling, Meetings, and Collaboration. Generally, it is used by companies and individuals working on projects. However, Microsoft Teams is available for macOS, Windows, and Linux operating systems available now.

In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04 machine. By default, Microsoft Teams package is not available in the Ubuntu default repository. However we will show you 2 methods to install Teams by downloading the Debian package from their official website, or by adding the Microsoft repository.

Install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04

1./ Install Microsoft Teams using Debian installer file

01- First, navigate to teams app downloads page and grab the Debian binary installer. You can simply obtain the URL and pull the binary using wget;

$ VERSION=1.3.00.5153
$ wget https://packages.microsoft.com/repos/ms-teams/pool/main/t/teams/teams_${VERSION}_amd64.deb

#linux #ubuntu #install microsoft teams on ubuntu #install teams ubuntu #microsoft teams #teams #teams download ubuntu #teams install ubuntu #ubuntu install microsoft teams #uninstall teams ubuntu

Rory  West

Rory West

1621745280

Create EC2 instance from AWS Console

What is EC2 Instance?

Secure and resizable compute capacity in the cloud.

Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud ( Amazon EC2) is a web service that provides secure, resizable compute capacity in the cloud. It is designed to make web-scale cloud computing easier for developers.

In this article let us see how to create On-demand EC2 instance from Console.

#create-ec2-instance #aws-ec2-instance #ec2-instance #amazon-web-services #aws

Devyn  Reilly

Devyn Reilly

1620641640

How to Install MySQL Workbench in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Full Steps

As we know, MySQL is the most used relational database management system. It is an open-source database management tool. There are various options to manage and use the database. Such as Command line and GUI. We already installed and used the command line in Ubuntu using the LAMP stack. Also, we already did the setup of phpMyAdmin for the GUI access in Ubuntu. MySQL Workbench is a unified visual tool for database architects, developers, and DBAs. It provides the various options for a DBA, developer, or data architect. Such as to visually design, model, generate, and manage databases. It contains everything which required a data modeler for creating complex ER models. If we talk about phpMyAdmin then is also an open-source software for MySQL and MariaDB. This is just a portable web application and written in PHP.

Today, in this post, I will show how you can install MySQL Workbench in Ubuntu. So, let’s move to the installation steps quickly.

#linux #mysql workbench for ubuntu #mysql #ubuntu

PostgreSQL Connection Pooling: Part 4 – PgBouncer vs. Pgpool-II

In our previous posts in this series, we spoke at length about using PgBouncer  and Pgpool-II , the connection pool architecture and pros and cons of leveraging one for your PostgreSQL deployment. In our final post, we will put them head-to-head in a detailed feature comparison and compare the results of PgBouncer vs. Pgpool-II performance for your PostgreSQL hosting !

The bottom line – Pgpool-II is a great tool if you need load-balancing and high availability. Connection pooling is almost a bonus you get alongside. PgBouncer does only one thing, but does it really well. If the objective is to limit the number of connections and reduce resource consumption, PgBouncer wins hands down.

It is also perfectly fine to use both PgBouncer and Pgpool-II in a chain – you can have a PgBouncer to provide connection pooling, which talks to a Pgpool-II instance that provides high availability and load balancing. This gives you the best of both worlds!

Using PgBouncer with Pgpool-II - Connection Pooling Diagram

PostgreSQL Connection Pooling: Part 4 – PgBouncer vs. Pgpool-II

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Performance Testing

While PgBouncer may seem to be the better option in theory, theory can often be misleading. So, we pitted the two connection poolers head-to-head, using the standard pgbench tool, to see which one provides better transactions per second throughput through a benchmark test. For good measure, we ran the same tests without a connection pooler too.

Testing Conditions

All of the PostgreSQL benchmark tests were run under the following conditions:

  1. Initialized pgbench using a scale factor of 100.
  2. Disabled auto-vacuuming on the PostgreSQL instance to prevent interference.
  3. No other workload was working at the time.
  4. Used the default pgbench script to run the tests.
  5. Used default settings for both PgBouncer and Pgpool-II, except max_children*. All PostgreSQL limits were also set to their defaults.
  6. All tests ran as a single thread, on a single-CPU, 2-core machine, for a duration of 5 minutes.
  7. Forced pgbench to create a new connection for each transaction using the -C option. This emulates modern web application workloads and is the whole reason to use a pooler!

We ran each iteration for 5 minutes to ensure any noise averaged out. Here is how the middleware was installed:

  • For PgBouncer, we installed it on the same box as the PostgreSQL server(s). This is the configuration we use in our managed PostgreSQL clusters. Since PgBouncer is a very light-weight process, installing it on the box has no impact on overall performance.
  • For Pgpool-II, we tested both when the Pgpool-II instance was installed on the same machine as PostgreSQL (on box column), and when it was installed on a different machine (off box column). As expected, the performance is much better when Pgpool-II is off the box as it doesn’t have to compete with the PostgreSQL server for resources.

Throughput Benchmark

Here are the transactions per second (TPS) results for each scenario across a range of number of clients:

#database #developer #performance #postgresql #connection control #connection pooler #connection pooler performance #connection queue #high availability #load balancing #number of connections #performance testing #pgbench #pgbouncer #pgbouncer and pgpool-ii #pgbouncer vs pgpool #pgpool-ii #pooling modes #postgresql connection pooling #postgresql limits #resource consumption #throughput benchmark #transactions per second #without pooling