Why Future of IoT Will Make You Question Everything - BrainyWit

Hello friends, have you ever thought what will happen if the devices start speaking to each other?

For instance-Your alarm clock wakes you up at 6:00 AM and it is connected to the internet and at the same time, your coffee machine starts preparing coffee for you by censoring your alarm sound.

This is the power of the Internet of Things (IoT) and this level of comfort will provide you in the future.

So, Theoretically Internet of Things or IoT is the devices that are connected to the internet to communicate with each other. Whatever, whether it is living or non-living, those which are connected to the internet is IoT.

What is the Future of IoT and How it Will Change Our Lives in the Upcoming Years

Internet of things (IoT) is expanding globally very rapidly and everyone starts to understand the need to welcome it in their personal as well as working life. The market value of IoT is expected to reach **USD 1256.1 billion by 2025. **

The impact of IoT will be seen at every corner of the world very soon. IoT gadgets collect data and provide ease in performance. It provides great economic benefits and also reduces human involvement which in turn decreases the chance of mistake.

10 Trends to Expect in the Forthcoming Time

**
1: Sci-fictional homes will be your home
2: The living will become easy in smart cities
3: Smart Office and School
4: The smart car will be the new fashion
5: IOT increasing your life span
6: Artificial intelligence and IoT
7: Voice User Interface
8: Miniaturization of “things” and Power
9: 5G network-a new fuel for the development of IoT
10: Routers will likely continue to seek new ways to enhance security
**
https://brainywit.com/future-of-iot/

#iot #internetofthings #ai

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Why Future of IoT Will Make You Question Everything - BrainyWit
Wilford  Pagac

Wilford Pagac

1596789120

Best Custom Web & Mobile App Development Company

Everything around us has become smart, like smart infrastructures, smart cities, autonomous vehicles, to name a few. The innovation of smart devices makes it possible to achieve these heights in science and technology. But, data is vulnerable, there is a risk of attack by cybercriminals. To get started, let’s know about IoT devices.

What are IoT devices?

The Internet Of Things(IoT) is a system that interrelates computer devices like sensors, software, and actuators, digital machines, etc. They are linked together with particular objects that work through the internet and transfer data over devices without humans interference.

Famous examples are Amazon Alexa, Apple SIRI, Interconnected baby monitors, video doorbells, and smart thermostats.

How could your IoT devices be vulnerable?

When technologies grow and evolve, risks are also on the high stakes. Ransomware attacks are on the continuous increase; securing data has become the top priority.

When you think your smart home won’t fudge a thing against cybercriminals, you should also know that they are vulnerable. When cybercriminals access our smart voice speakers like Amazon Alexa or Apple Siri, it becomes easy for them to steal your data.

Cybersecurity report 2020 says popular hacking forums expose 770 million email addresses and 21 million unique passwords, 620 million accounts have been compromised from 16 hacked websites.

The attacks are likely to increase every year. To help you secure your data of IoT devices, here are some best tips you can implement.

Tips to secure your IoT devices

1. Change Default Router Name

Your router has the default name of make and model. When we stick with the manufacturer name, attackers can quickly identify our make and model. So give the router name different from your addresses, without giving away personal information.

2. Know your connected network and connected devices

If your devices are connected to the internet, these connections are vulnerable to cyber attacks when your devices don’t have the proper security. Almost every web interface is equipped with multiple devices, so it’s hard to track the device. But, it’s crucial to stay aware of them.

3. Change default usernames and passwords

When we use the default usernames and passwords, it is attackable. Because the cybercriminals possibly know the default passwords come with IoT devices. So use strong passwords to access our IoT devices.

4. Manage strong, Unique passwords for your IoT devices and accounts

Use strong or unique passwords that are easily assumed, such as ‘123456’ or ‘password1234’ to protect your accounts. Give strong and complex passwords formed by combinations of alphabets, numeric, and not easily bypassed symbols.

Also, change passwords for multiple accounts and change them regularly to avoid attacks. We can also set several attempts to wrong passwords to set locking the account to safeguard from the hackers.

5. Do not use Public WI-FI Networks

Are you try to keep an eye on your IoT devices through your mobile devices in different locations. I recommend you not to use the public WI-FI network to access them. Because they are easily accessible through for everyone, you are still in a hurry to access, use VPN that gives them protection against cyber-attacks, giving them privacy and security features, for example, using Express VPN.

6. Establish firewalls to discover the vulnerabilities

There are software and firewalls like intrusion detection system/intrusion prevention system in the market. This will be useful to screen and analyze the wire traffic of a network. You can identify the security weakness by the firewall scanners within the network structure. Use these firewalls to get rid of unwanted security issues and vulnerabilities.

7. Reconfigure your device settings

Every smart device comes with the insecure default settings, and sometimes we are not able to change these default settings configurations. These conditions need to be assessed and need to reconfigure the default settings.

8. Authenticate the IoT applications

Nowadays, every smart app offers authentication to secure the accounts. There are many types of authentication methods like single-factor authentication, two-step authentication, and multi-factor authentication. Use any one of these to send a one time password (OTP) to verify the user who logs in the smart device to keep our accounts from falling into the wrong hands.

9. Update the device software up to date

Every smart device manufacturer releases updates to fix bugs in their software. These security patches help us to improve our protection of the device. Also, update the software on the smartphone, which we are used to monitoring the IoT devices to avoid vulnerabilities.

10. Track the smartphones and keep them safe

When we connect the smart home to the smartphone and control them via smartphone, you need to keep them safe. If you miss the phone almost, every personal information is at risk to the cybercriminals. But sometimes it happens by accident, makes sure that you can clear all the data remotely.

However, securing smart devices is essential in the world of data. There are still cybercriminals bypassing the securities. So make sure to do the safety measures to avoid our accounts falling out into the wrong hands. I hope these steps will help you all to secure your IoT devices.

If you have any, feel free to share them in the comments! I’d love to know them.

Are you looking for more? Subscribe to weekly newsletters that can help your stay updated IoT application developments.

#iot #enterprise iot security #how iot can be used to enhance security #how to improve iot security #how to protect iot devices from hackers #how to secure iot devices #iot security #iot security devices #iot security offerings #iot security technologies iot security plus #iot vulnerable devices #risk based iot security program

Internet of Things (IoT): The Roadmap to a Smart Future - Mobinius

https://www.mobinius.com/blogs/internet-of-things-iot-the-roadmap-to-a-smart-future

#iot #iot-apps #iot-app-development-company #iot-solutions #hire-iot-developers #custom-iot-development

Annie  Emard

Annie Emard

1653075360

HAML Lint: Tool For Writing Clean and Consistent HAML

HAML-Lint

haml-lint is a tool to help keep your HAML files clean and readable. In addition to HAML-specific style and lint checks, it integrates with RuboCop to bring its powerful static analysis tools to your HAML documents.

You can run haml-lint manually from the command line, or integrate it into your SCM hooks.

Requirements

  • Ruby 2.4+
  • HAML 4.0+

Installation

gem install haml_lint

If you'd rather install haml-lint using bundler, don't require it in your Gemfile:

gem 'haml_lint', require: false

Then you can still use haml-lint from the command line, but its source code won't be auto-loaded inside your application.

Usage

Run haml-lint from the command line by passing in a directory (or multiple directories) to recursively scan:

haml-lint app/views/

You can also specify a list of files explicitly:

haml-lint app/**/*.html.haml

haml-lint will output any problems with your HAML, including the offending filename and line number.

File Encoding

haml-lint assumes all files are encoded in UTF-8.

Command Line Flags

Command Line FlagDescription
--auto-gen-configGenerate a configuration file acting as a TODO list
--auto-gen-exclude-limitNumber of failures to allow in the TODO list before the entire rule is excluded
-c/--configSpecify which configuration file to use
-e/--excludeExclude one or more files from being linted
-i/--include-linterSpecify which linters you specifically want to run
-x/--exclude-linterSpecify which linters you don't want to run
-r/--reporterSpecify which reporter you want to use to generate the output
-p/--parallelRun linters in parallel using available CPUs
--fail-fastSpecify whether to fail after the first file with lint
--fail-levelSpecify the minimum severity (warning or error) for which the lint should fail
--[no-]colorWhether to output in color
--[no-]summaryWhether to output a summary in the default reporter
--show-lintersShow all registered linters
--show-reportersDisplay available reporters
-h/--helpShow command line flag documentation
-v/--versionShow haml-lint version
-V/--verbose-versionShow haml-lint, haml, and ruby version information

Configuration

haml-lint will automatically recognize and load any file with the name .haml-lint.yml as a configuration file. It loads the configuration based on the directory haml-lint is being run from, ascending until a configuration file is found. Any configuration loaded is automatically merged with the default configuration (see config/default.yml).

Here's an example configuration file:

linters:
  ImplicitDiv:
    enabled: false
    severity: error

  LineLength:
    max: 100

All linters have an enabled option which can be true or false, which controls whether the linter is run, along with linter-specific options. The defaults are defined in config/default.yml.

Linter Options

OptionDescription
enabledIf false, this linter will never be run. This takes precedence over any other option.
includeList of files or glob patterns to scope this linter to. This narrows down any files specified via the command line.
excludeList of files or glob patterns to exclude from this linter. This excludes any files specified via the command line or already filtered via the include option.
severityThe severity of the linter. External tools consuming haml-lint output can use this to determine whether to warn or error based on the lints reported.

Global File Exclusion

The exclude global configuration option allows you to specify a list of files or glob patterns to exclude from all linters. This is useful for ignoring third-party code that you don't maintain or care to lint. You can specify a single string or a list of strings for this option.

Skipping Frontmatter

Some static blog generators such as Jekyll include leading frontmatter to the template for their own tracking purposes. haml-lint allows you to ignore these headers by specifying the skip_frontmatter option in your .haml-lint.yml configuration:

skip_frontmatter: true

Inheriting from Other Configuration Files

The inherits_from global configuration option allows you to specify an inheritance chain for a configuration file. It accepts either a scalar value of a single file name or a vector of multiple files to inherit from. The inherited files are resolved in a first in, first out order and with "last one wins" precedence. For example:

inherits_from:
  - .shared_haml-lint.yml
  - .personal_haml-lint.yml

First, the default configuration is loaded. Then the .shared_haml-lint.yml configuration is loaded, followed by .personal_haml-lint.yml. Each of these overwrite each other in the event of a collision in configuration value. Once the inheritance chain is resolved, the base configuration is loaded and applies its rules to overwrite any in the intermediate configuration.

Lastly, in order to match your RuboCop configuration style, you can also use the inherit_from directive, which is an alias for inherits_from.

Linters

» Linters Documentation

haml-lint is an opinionated tool that helps you enforce a consistent style in your HAML files. As an opinionated tool, we've had to make calls about what we think are the "best" style conventions, even when there are often reasonable arguments for more than one possible style. While all of our choices have a rational basis, we think that the opinions themselves are less important than the fact that haml-lint provides us with an automated and low-cost means of enforcing consistency.

Custom Linters

Add the following to your configuration file:

require:
  - './relative/path/to/my_first_linter.rb'
  - 'absolute/path/to/my_second_linter.rb'

The files that are referenced by this config should have the following structure:

module HamlLint
  # MyFirstLinter is the name of the linter in this example, but it can be anything
  class Linter::MyFirstLinter < Linter
    include LinterRegistry

    def visit_tag
      return unless node.tag_name == 'div'
      record_lint(node, "You're not allowed divs!")
    end
  end
end

For more information on the different types on HAML node, please look through the HAML parser code: https://github.com/haml/haml/blob/master/lib/haml/parser.rb

Keep in mind that by default your linter will be disabled by default. So you will need to enable it in your configuration file to have it run.

Disabling Linters within Source Code

One or more individual linters can be disabled locally in a file by adding a directive comment. These comments look like the following:

-# haml-lint:disable AltText, LineLength
[...]
-# haml-lint:enable AltText, LineLength

You can disable all linters for a section with the following:

-# haml-lint:disable all

Directive Scope

A directive will disable the given linters for the scope of the block. This scope is inherited by child elements and sibling elements that come after the comment. For example:

-# haml-lint:disable AltText
#content
  %img#will-not-show-lint-1{ src: "will-not-show-lint-1.png" }
  -# haml-lint:enable AltText
  %img#will-show-lint-1{ src: "will-show-lint-1.png" }
  .sidebar
    %img#will-show-lint-2{ src: "will-show-lint-2.png" }
%img#will-not-show-lint-2{ src: "will-not-show-lint-2.png" }

The #will-not-show-lint-1 image on line 2 will not raise an AltText lint because of the directive on line 1. Since that directive is at the top level of the tree, it applies everywhere.

However, on line 4, the directive enables the AltText linter for the remainder of the #content element's content. This means that the #will-show-lint-1 image on line 5 will raise an AltText lint because it is a sibling of the enabling directive that appears later in the #content element. Likewise, the #will-show-lint-2 image on line 7 will raise an AltText lint because it is a child of a sibling of the enabling directive.

Lastly, the #will-not-show-lint-2 image on line 8 will not raise an AltText lint because the enabling directive on line 4 exists in a separate element and is not a sibling of the it.

Directive Precedence

If there are multiple directives for the same linter in an element, the last directive wins. For example:

-# haml-lint:enable AltText
%p Hello, world!
-# haml-lint:disable AltText
%img#will-not-show-lint{ src: "will-not-show-lint.png" }

There are two conflicting directives for the AltText linter. The first one enables it, but the second one disables it. Since the disable directive came later, the #will-not-show-lint element will not raise an AltText lint.

You can use this functionality to selectively enable directives within a file by first using the haml-lint:disable all directive to disable all linters in the file, then selectively using haml-lint:enable to enable linters one at a time.

Onboarding Onto a Preexisting Project

Adding a new linter into a project that wasn't previously using one can be a daunting task. To help ease the pain of starting to use Haml-Lint, you can generate a configuration file that will exclude all linters from reporting lint in files that currently have lint. This gives you something similar to a to-do list where the violations that you had when you started using Haml-Lint are listed for you to whittle away, but ensuring that any views you create going forward are properly linted.

To use this functionality, call Haml-Lint like:

haml-lint --auto-gen-config

This will generate a .haml-lint_todo.yml file that contains all existing lint as exclusions. You can then add inherits_from: .haml-lint_todo.yml to your .haml-lint.yml configuration file to ensure these exclusions are used whenever you call haml-lint.

By default, any rules with more than 15 violations will be disabled in the todo-file. You can increase this limit with the auto-gen-exclude-limit option:

haml-lint --auto-gen-config --auto-gen-exclude-limit 100

Editor Integration

Vim

If you use vim, you can have haml-lint automatically run against your HAML files after saving by using the Syntastic plugin. If you already have the plugin, just add let g:syntastic_haml_checkers = ['haml_lint'] to your .vimrc.

Vim 8 / Neovim

If you use vim 8+ or Neovim, you can have haml-lint automatically run against your HAML files as you type by using the Asynchronous Lint Engine (ALE) plugin. ALE will automatically lint your HAML files if it detects haml-lint in your PATH.

Sublime Text 3

If you use SublimeLinter 3 with Sublime Text 3 you can install the SublimeLinter-haml-lint plugin using Package Control.

Atom

If you use atom, you can install the linter-haml plugin.

TextMate 2

If you use TextMate 2, you can install the Haml-Lint.tmbundle bundle.

Visual Studio Code

If you use Visual Studio Code, you can install the Haml Lint extension

Git Integration

If you'd like to integrate haml-lint into your Git workflow, check out our Git hook manager, overcommit.

Rake Integration

To execute haml-lint via a Rake task, make sure you have rake included in your gem path (e.g. via Gemfile) add the following to your Rakefile:

require 'haml_lint/rake_task'

HamlLint::RakeTask.new

By default, when you execute rake haml_lint, the above configuration is equivalent to running haml-lint ., which will lint all .haml files in the current directory and its descendants.

You can customize your task by writing:

require 'haml_lint/rake_task'

HamlLint::RakeTask.new do |t|
  t.config = 'custom/config.yml'
  t.files = ['app/views', 'custom/*.haml']
  t.quiet = true # Don't display output from haml-lint to STDOUT
end

You can also use this custom configuration with a set of files specified via the command line:

# Single quotes prevent shell glob expansion
rake 'haml_lint[app/views, custom/*.haml]'

Files specified in this manner take precedence over the task's files attribute.

Documentation

Code documentation is generated with YARD and hosted by RubyDoc.info.

Contributing

We love getting feedback with or without pull requests. If you do add a new feature, please add tests so that we can avoid breaking it in the future.

Speaking of tests, we use Appraisal to test against both HAML 4 and 5. We use rspec to write our tests. To run the test suite, execute the following from the root directory of the repository:

appraisal bundle install
appraisal bundle exec rspec

Community

All major discussion surrounding HAML-Lint happens on the GitHub issues page.

Changelog

If you're interested in seeing the changes and bug fixes between each version of haml-lint, read the HAML-Lint Changelog.

Author: sds
Source Code: https://github.com/sds/haml-lint
License: MIT license

#haml #lint 

The Best of IoT: Tutorials and Articles

We’ve compiled the best of the best from the IoT Zone, where you’ll find articles and tutorials using Arduino, Raspberry Pi, MQTT, and microcontrollers. You’ll also see lists of different IoT platforms and augmented reality SDKs as well as Arduino alternatives if that’s not your thing. We also pulled together articles on IoT and agriculture, healthcare, transportation, and much more. Enjoy!

Tutorials and Projects

Building the World’s Largest Raspberry Pi Cluster by Gerald Venzl — Oracle’s Raspberry Pi Supercomputer, the largest Raspberry Pi cluster known to exist, got

#iot #raspberry pi #arduino #mqtt #iot security #iot in healthcare #best of iot #iot in agriculture #iot tutorials

Juned Ghanchi

1621423096

IOT app development company India, Hire IOT Developers

Embrace the future with the IoT (internet of things), and create an advanced ecosystem for your business to drive growth.

Our expert team of developers creates state of the art IoT based apps that connect with remote devices and integrate different software and services to build an ultramodern infrastructure for our clients worldwide.

To accelerate your business development process, hire IoT app developers in India. We have the experience and a proven track record of providing cutting-edge IoT based services.

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