Andrew French

1607443020

HTTP Assertions for Oak Made Easy via SuperDeno

SuperOak

HTTP assertions for Deno’s Oak web framework made easy via SuperDeno.

About

This module aims to provide a high-level abstraction for testing HTTP in Deno’s Oak web framework. This is a wrapper compatibility layer around SuperDeno to reduce some of the boilerplate needed to setup Oak integration + functional tests.

Installation

This is a Deno module available to import direct from this repo and via the Deno Registry.

Before importing, download and install Deno.

You can then import SuperOak straight into your project:

import { superoak } from "https://deno.land/x/superoak@2.4.0/mod.ts";

SuperOak is also available on nest.land, a package registry for Deno on the Blockchain.

import { superoak } from "https://x.nest.land/superoak@2.4.0/mod.ts";

Example

You may pass a url string (for an already running Oak server), or an Oak Application object to superoak() - when passing an Oak Application, SuperOak will automatically handle the creation of a server, binding to a free ephemeral port and closing of the server on a call to .end().

SuperOak works with any Deno test framework. Here’s an example with Deno’s built-in test framework.

import { Application, Router } from "https://deno.land/x/oak@v6.2.0/mod.ts";
import { superoak } from "https://deno.land/x/superoak@2.4.0/mod.ts";

const router = new Router();
router.get("/", (ctx) => {
  ctx.response.body = "Hello Deno!";
});

const app = new Application();
app.use(router.routes());
app.use(router.allowedMethods());

Deno.test("it should support the Oak framework", async () => {
  const request = await superoak(app);
  await request.get("/").expect("Hello Deno!");
});

Save the above to a file demo.test.ts and test it using deno test --allow-net demo.test.ts.

For further examples, see the SuperOak examples, tests or the SuperDeno examples for inspiration.

Documentation

API

Please refer to the SuperDeno API.

Notes

  • Unlike SuperDeno, superoak() returns a promise which will need to be awaited before you can call a method such as .get("/").

  • Unlike SuperDeno, you cannot re-use a SuperOak instance once the chained .end() method has been called. This is because SuperOak will automatically close the server once the chained .end() method is called. Instead you should make all of your assertions on the one SuperOak instance, or create a new SuperOak instance like below:

    import { Application, Router } from "https://deno.land/x/oak@v6.2.0/mod.ts";
    import { superoak } from "https://deno.land/x/superoak@2.4.0/mod.ts";
    
    const router = new Router();
    const app = new Application();
    
    router.get("/", (ctx) => {
      ctx.response.body = "Hello Deno!";
    });
    
    app.use(router.routes());
    app.use(router.allowedMethods());
    
    Deno.test(
      "it will allow your to make multiple assertions on one SuperOak instance",
      async () => {
        let request = await superoak(app);
    
        await request.get("/").expect(200).expect("Hello Deno!");
      }
    );
    
    Deno.test(
      "it will allow your to re-use the Application for another SuperOak instance",
      async () => {
        let request = await superoak(app);
    
        await request.get("/").expect(200);
    
        request = await superoak(app);
    
        await request.get("/").expect("Hello Deno!");
      }
    );
    

Contributing

Contributing guide


License

SuperOak is licensed under the MIT License.

Icon designed and created by Hannah Morten.

Download Details:

Author: asos-craigmorten

Demo: https://asos-craigmorten.github.io/superoak/

Source Code: https://github.com/asos-craigmorten/superoak

#deno #nodejs #node #javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

HTTP Assertions for Oak Made Easy via SuperDeno
Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1623861240

What is Assertion in Java? How to use Assertion in Java

Table of Contents

What is Assertion in Java?

The assertion in Java is used to ensure the correctness of any program’s assumptions as the assertion is assumed to be true when it is executed. The Java Virtual Machine throws an error named AssertionError if the assertion is false. The assertion in Java has found its application mainly for testing purposes. Boolean expressions are used along with assertion statements. An assertion is a statement, and the ‘asset’ keyword is used to carry out an assertion in Java.

#full stack development #assertion in java #assertion in java #assertion in java #what is assertion in java #how to use assertion in java

Andrew French

1607443020

HTTP Assertions for Oak Made Easy via SuperDeno

SuperOak

HTTP assertions for Deno’s Oak web framework made easy via SuperDeno.

About

This module aims to provide a high-level abstraction for testing HTTP in Deno’s Oak web framework. This is a wrapper compatibility layer around SuperDeno to reduce some of the boilerplate needed to setup Oak integration + functional tests.

Installation

This is a Deno module available to import direct from this repo and via the Deno Registry.

Before importing, download and install Deno.

You can then import SuperOak straight into your project:

import { superoak } from "https://deno.land/x/superoak@2.4.0/mod.ts";

SuperOak is also available on nest.land, a package registry for Deno on the Blockchain.

import { superoak } from "https://x.nest.land/superoak@2.4.0/mod.ts";

Example

You may pass a url string (for an already running Oak server), or an Oak Application object to superoak() - when passing an Oak Application, SuperOak will automatically handle the creation of a server, binding to a free ephemeral port and closing of the server on a call to .end().

SuperOak works with any Deno test framework. Here’s an example with Deno’s built-in test framework.

import { Application, Router } from "https://deno.land/x/oak@v6.2.0/mod.ts";
import { superoak } from "https://deno.land/x/superoak@2.4.0/mod.ts";

const router = new Router();
router.get("/", (ctx) => {
  ctx.response.body = "Hello Deno!";
});

const app = new Application();
app.use(router.routes());
app.use(router.allowedMethods());

Deno.test("it should support the Oak framework", async () => {
  const request = await superoak(app);
  await request.get("/").expect("Hello Deno!");
});

Save the above to a file demo.test.ts and test it using deno test --allow-net demo.test.ts.

For further examples, see the SuperOak examples, tests or the SuperDeno examples for inspiration.

Documentation

API

Please refer to the SuperDeno API.

Notes

  • Unlike SuperDeno, superoak() returns a promise which will need to be awaited before you can call a method such as .get("/").

  • Unlike SuperDeno, you cannot re-use a SuperOak instance once the chained .end() method has been called. This is because SuperOak will automatically close the server once the chained .end() method is called. Instead you should make all of your assertions on the one SuperOak instance, or create a new SuperOak instance like below:

    import { Application, Router } from "https://deno.land/x/oak@v6.2.0/mod.ts";
    import { superoak } from "https://deno.land/x/superoak@2.4.0/mod.ts";
    
    const router = new Router();
    const app = new Application();
    
    router.get("/", (ctx) => {
      ctx.response.body = "Hello Deno!";
    });
    
    app.use(router.routes());
    app.use(router.allowedMethods());
    
    Deno.test(
      "it will allow your to make multiple assertions on one SuperOak instance",
      async () => {
        let request = await superoak(app);
    
        await request.get("/").expect(200).expect("Hello Deno!");
      }
    );
    
    Deno.test(
      "it will allow your to re-use the Application for another SuperOak instance",
      async () => {
        let request = await superoak(app);
    
        await request.get("/").expect(200);
    
        request = await superoak(app);
    
        await request.get("/").expect("Hello Deno!");
      }
    );
    

Contributing

Contributing guide


License

SuperOak is licensed under the MIT License.

Icon designed and created by Hannah Morten.

Download Details:

Author: asos-craigmorten

Demo: https://asos-craigmorten.github.io/superoak/

Source Code: https://github.com/asos-craigmorten/superoak

#deno #nodejs #node #javascript

Hertha  Mayer

Hertha Mayer

1596255360

Super easy trick to bypass Http Interceptors in Angular

Searching for a better folder structure for angular projects? Check this article out, you can thank me later.

Image for post

Photo by Amir samoh on unsplash

Recently, I have been working on a task, regarding AWS S3 bucket file uploading using Angular and preSigned URLs. In that project, I have used HTTP interceptor to handle my request to bind all header parameters. My problem arose while I was trying upload files and found that I wasn’t able to since there were “two Authorization headers” in that request. They were the usual request header with token and the header which auto binds by the presigned Url. To solve this issue, I found a super-easy solution that allowed me to bypass my HTTP interceptor and BOOM! Issue fixed. Let’s dive into what I did.

Wait… What is an Interceptor?

Before starting the explanation of my trick, let’s get to know what interceptors are and how we can use them.

Angular is one of the most popular front-end development frameworks in the developer community. One of the main reasons for that is that Angular provides many built-in tools that help to scale industry level JavaScript applications. Interceptors are one of the tools in the list capable of handling HTTP requests globally. They allow us to intercept incoming and outgoing HTTP requests using the HttpClient. By intercepting the request we can modify or change any parameter of the request.

Before diving any deeper I suggest that you have a basic knowledge of Angular HTTP Client and RxJS Observable.

Here is the trick

As I mentioned above, there are occasions where we need to allow for a custom header (or, in other words, to skip the interceptor action in http requests).

BONUS POINT:_ Usually in Angular best practices, it is better to keep our services separate from modules, components and models etc. Please checkout the below folder structure. It is better if you can refer to this structure for your future implementations._

src
 ┣ app
 ┃ ┣ common
 ┃ ┣ customer
 ┃ ┣ models
 ┃ ┣ public
 ┃ ┣ services
 ┃ ┃ ┣ authentication
 ┃ ┃ ┃ ┣ guards
 ┃ ┃ ┃ ┃ ┣ auth.guard.ts
 ┃ ┃ ┃ ┣ interceptors
 ┃ ┃ ┃ ┃ ┣ response.interceptor.ts
 ┃ ┃ ┃ ┗ auth.service.ts
 ┃ ┃ ┣ directives
 ┃ ┃ ┣ pipes
 ┃ ┃ ┣ resolvers
 ┃ ┃ ┣ services-api
 ┃ ┃ ┣ services-inter
 ┃ ┣ app.component.css
 ┃ ┣ app.component.html
 ┃ ┣ app.component.spec.ts
 ┃ ┣ app.component.ts
 ┃ ┣ app.module.ts
 ┃ ┣ app.routing.ts
 ┃ ┗ app.server.module.ts
 ┣ assets
 ┣ environments
 ┣ favicon.ico
 ┣ index.html

As per the file tree, I kept my interceptors inside the _src/services/interceptors _folder.

Image for post

#http-interceptors #angular #http-client #programming #http-request

Go net/http Starter

In this edition of Stripe Developer Office Hours, follow along as CJ Avilla walks through the fundamentals of setting up a basic web application with the net/http go lang package.

#net/http starter #net/http #http #net

Macey  Legros

Macey Legros

1600702260

Assertion in Java Example | Java Assertion Tutorial

Java assertion is an inbuilt statement that ensures the correctness of any assumptions which have been done in the program. When an assertion is executed, it is assumed to be true. If the assertion is false, the JVM will throw an Assertion error. Assertions in Java can be done with the help of the assert keyword.

Suppose there is a condition that you, as a programmer or a developer, while testing your code, want to make sure exists, such as making sure that a particular method shall  return only negative values; Java has a (relatively) new feature made available just for that.

The feature is called assertion, and wherein one can assert the existence of a particular condition. It is done with the help of the keyword assert. Assertions are generally used for testing and scarcely used in the release code. Release code is usually run with assertions disabled.

#Why to use Assertions

  1. We can make sure that an unreachable looking code is unreachable.
  2. We can make sure that assumptions written in the comments are right.
         if ((x & 1) == 1)  
         {  }
         else // x must be even 
         { assert (x % 2 == 0); }
  1. We can make sure the default switch case is not reached.
  2. We can check the object’s state.
  3. At the beginning of the method
  4. After the method invocation.

#assertion #java #assert