Paris  Turcotte

Paris Turcotte

1614847140

ContainerDrip, Another Example of Why HTTP Basic Authentication Is Flawed

HTTP authentication is so prevalent we rarely question it. But attacks like ContainerDrip have an important reminder for authentication at scale in cloud-native environments.

The latest exploit in the series of issues with cloud infrastructure software is called “ContainerDrip” (CVE-2020-15157). In some cases, it can cause you to leak your registry secrets to an attacker. The attack is actually a kind of secret or password leak using request forgery. Your client unintentionally makes an HTTP API request to the attacker’s endpoint where this request contains the container image registry secret. In this post, I want to point out the bigger underlying problem, but first the attack.

In a nutshell, when you decide to pull a container image, you download its manifest file first – which describes how the container image actually looks. Container images are made of file system layers, and the manifest file tells you where you can download these layers one-by-one, based on URLs.

Without diving into the specifics, the general mechanics of the attack are that a malicious actor pushes a specially crafted manifest file to a public repository (like Docker Hub, let’s say “library/gonnastealyoursecret:v1”). In this manifest, they put a layer URL to their own webserver (https://registry.evil.com). Now, when someone tries to pull the image above, the containerd (managing images) makes a request https://toregistry.evil.com with the secret Docker registry credentials. This server will authenticate itself correctly using HTTPS, but will take the secret from the request and the attacker will have your Docker registry secrets. There are obviously more details, but this is not the point I want to make (see a complete writeup here).

#http #kubernetes

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Buddha Community

ContainerDrip, Another Example of Why HTTP Basic Authentication Is Flawed

How To Set Up Two-Factor Authentication in cPanel

What is 2FA
Two-Factor Authentication (or 2FA as it often referred to) is an extra layer of security that is used to provide users an additional level of protection when securing access to an account.
Employing a 2FA mechanism is a vast improvement in security over the Singe-Factor Authentication method of simply employing a username and password. Using this method, accounts that have 2FA enabled, require the user to enter a one-time passcode that is generated by an external application. The 2FA passcode (usually a six-digit number) is required to be input into the passcode field before access is granted. The 2FA input is usually required directly after the username and password are entered by the client.

#tutorials #2fa #access #account security #authentication #authentication method #authentication token #cli #command line #cpanel #feature manager #google authenticator #one time password #otp #otp authentication #passcode #password #passwords #qr code #security #security code #security policy #security practices #single factor authentication #time-based one-time password #totp #two factor authentication #whm

Paris  Turcotte

Paris Turcotte

1614847140

ContainerDrip, Another Example of Why HTTP Basic Authentication Is Flawed

HTTP authentication is so prevalent we rarely question it. But attacks like ContainerDrip have an important reminder for authentication at scale in cloud-native environments.

The latest exploit in the series of issues with cloud infrastructure software is called “ContainerDrip” (CVE-2020-15157). In some cases, it can cause you to leak your registry secrets to an attacker. The attack is actually a kind of secret or password leak using request forgery. Your client unintentionally makes an HTTP API request to the attacker’s endpoint where this request contains the container image registry secret. In this post, I want to point out the bigger underlying problem, but first the attack.

In a nutshell, when you decide to pull a container image, you download its manifest file first – which describes how the container image actually looks. Container images are made of file system layers, and the manifest file tells you where you can download these layers one-by-one, based on URLs.

Without diving into the specifics, the general mechanics of the attack are that a malicious actor pushes a specially crafted manifest file to a public repository (like Docker Hub, let’s say “library/gonnastealyoursecret:v1”). In this manifest, they put a layer URL to their own webserver (https://registry.evil.com). Now, when someone tries to pull the image above, the containerd (managing images) makes a request https://toregistry.evil.com with the secret Docker registry credentials. This server will authenticate itself correctly using HTTPS, but will take the secret from the request and the attacker will have your Docker registry secrets. There are obviously more details, but this is not the point I want to make (see a complete writeup here).

#http #kubernetes

I am Developer

1602036957

Laravel 8 REST API Authentication with Passport Example Tutorial

Laravel 8 rest api authentication with passport tutorial, you will learn step by step how to create rest API with laravel 8 passport authentication. And as well as how to install and cofigure passport auth in laravel 8 app.

Laravel 8 API Authentication with Passport Tutorial

Step 1: Download Laravel 8 App
Step 2: Database Configuration
Step 3: Install Passport Auth
Step 4: Passport Configuration
Step 5: Run Migration
Step 6: Create APIs Route
Step 7: Create Passport Auth Controller
Step 8: Now Test Laravel REST API in Postman

https://www.tutsmake.com/laravel-8-rest-api-authentication-with-passport/

#laravel api authentication with passport #laravel 8 api authentication #laravel 8 api authentication token tutorial #laravel 8 api authentication using passport #laravel 8 api authentication session

le pro

1606738079

Angular 9 JWT Login Authentication Example - loizenai.com

Angular 9 JWT Login Authentication Example

Tutorial: Angular 9 Login Authentication Example – Angular 9 + SpringBoot + MySQL/PostgreSQL JWT token Authentication
JWT Role Based Authorization with Spring Boot and Angular 9 (Spring Boot Login Example)

JSON Web Token (JWT) is an open standard (RFC 7519) that defines a compact and self-contained way for securely transmitting information between parties as a JSON object. So in tutorial ‘JWT Role Based Authorization with Spring Boot and Angular 9 (Spring Boot Login Example)’, I guide you very clearly how to implement full stack example to demonstrade an jwt token based authentication flow from frontend Angular 9 to backend: SpringBoot and MySQL.

– I give you an Epic of the application, a fullstack excutive flow from frontend – Angular 9 to backend – SpringBoot with overall architecture diagram.
– I give you an architecture diagram of SpringBoot security backend.
– I give you a working flow diagram of Angular 9 JWT Application.
– I guide you step by step how to develop a Backend SpringBoot secured RestAPIs with JWT token.
– I guide you step by step how to develop an Angular 9 JWT Token Authentication application.
– Finally, I do an integrative testing from Angular 9 JWT Authentication application to SpringBoot Backend Security RestAPIs.

Angular Spring Boot JWT Authentication example

We will build an application, from frontend (Angular) to backend (Spring Boot), which allows users to register, login account. This application is secured with JWT (JSON Web Token) authentication and Spring Security. Then, depending on the role of current User (user, pm or admin), this system accepts what he can access:

Angular-9-Login-Form

Angular 9 Register Form

Angular 9 Home Page of a User with USER_ROLE

Angular 9 Content Page of a User with USER_ROLE

The diagram below show how our system handles User Registration and User Login processes:

Angular 9 Spring Boot Security Jwt Token Authentication Work Process Diagram

SPRING BOOT BACK-END WITH SPRING SECURITY

This is diagram for SpringBoot Token based authentication Security/JWT classes that are separated into 3 layers:
– HTTP
– Spring Security
– REST API

Spring Boot Security Jwt Token Authentication Architecture Diagram Back End Server

– SecurityContextHolder provides access to the SecurityContext.
– SecurityContext holds the Authentication and possibly request-specific security information.
– Authentication represents the principal which includes GrantedAuthority that reflects the application-wide permissions granted to a principal.
– UserDetails contains necessary information to build an Authentication object from DAOs or other source of security data.
– UserDetailsService helps to create a UserDetails from a String-based username and is usually used by AuthenticationProvider.
– JwtAuthTokenFilter (extends OncePerRequestFilter) pre-processes HTTP request, from Token, create Authentication and populate it to SecurityContext.
– JwtProvider validates, parses token String or generates token String from UserDetails.
– UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken gets username/password from login Request and combines into an instance of Authentication interface.
– AuthenticationManager uses DaoAuthenticationProvider (with help of UserDetailsService & PasswordEncoder) to validate instance of UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken, then returns a fully populated Authentication instance on successful authentication.
– SecurityContext is established by calling SecurityContextHolder.getContext().setAuthentication(…​) with returned authentication object above.
– AuthenticationEntryPoint handles AuthenticationException.
– Access to Restful API is protected by HTTPSecurity and authorized with Method Security Expressions.

ANGULAR FRONT-END WITH INTERCEPTOR

In the tutorial, “Angular 9 + Spring Boot JWT Token Based Authentication Example”, we need the Angular HTTP Interceptor to add JWT Token Based for Security authentication:

Angular 9 Jwt Token Workflow Diagram

– app.component is the parent component that contains routerLink and router-outlet for routing. It also has an authority variable as the condition for displaying items on navigation bar.
– user.component, pm.component, admin.component correspond to Angular Components for User Board, PM Board, Admin Board. Each Board uses user.service to access authority data.
– register.component contains User Registration form, submission of the form will call auth.service.
– login.component contains User Login form, submission of the form will call auth.service and token-storage.service.

– user.service gets access to authority data from Server using Angular HttpClient ($http service).
– auth.service handles authentication and signup actions with Server using Angular HttpClient ($http service).
– every HTTP request by $http service will be inspected and transformed before being sent to the Server by auth-interceptor (implements HttpInterceptor).
– auth-interceptor check and get Token from token-storage.service to add the Token to Authorization Header of the HTTP Requests.

– token-storage.service manages Token inside Browser’s sessionStorage.

Video Guide – Angular SpringBoot JWT Authentication

https://youtu.be/7ZfInOvFsz0

Sourcecode

Tutorial Link

Angular 9 JWT Login Authentication Example

Related post

  1. Angular CRUD Application with SpringBoot and MySQL/PostgreSQL RestAPIs
  2. Build SpringBoot CRUD Application – FullStack: Frontend (Bootstrap and Ajax) to Backend (SpringBoot and MySQL/PostgreSQL database)
  3. Angular Nodejs Fullstack CRUD Application with MySQL/PostgreSQL

#angular #jwt #authentication #token #jwt-authentication #example

Alice Cook

Alice Cook

1615441648

Fix: Gmail Authentication Problems | Gmail 2-step Verification Bypass (2020-21)

An Gmail authentication error occurs when an account’s owner is unable to verify themselves; Gmail perceives it to be a threat to the account and its privacy, so it shows an authentication error. This can occur due to multiple reasons; entering the wrong password, using the wrong server port, and disabled IMAP on Gmail. You will find solutions to fix Gmail authentication problems in this Video. Additionally, you will find ways for Gmail 2-step verification bypass.
Visit: https://contactforhelp.com/gmail/

#gmail authentication error #gmail two factor authentication #gmail 2 step authentication #gmail authentication failed #gmail authentication problems #gmail 2 step verification bypass