Jamal  Lemke

Jamal Lemke

1603580400

Ten Principles For Agile Testers

In the previous blog we saw that what exactly is Agile testing and in this blog we will see in introduction to Principles For Agile Testers.

What is an Agile tester?

  • So get into the principles for Agile testers we first need to know what is an Agile tester? A professional tester who is not scared of change has knowledge about technical and business aspects as well and understands the concept of using tests to document requirements to drive development is an Agile tester.
  • Now let’s see what are in ten principles for Agile testers:
  • Provide continuous feedback.
  • Deliver value to the customer.
  • Enable face-to-face communication.
  • Have courage.
  • Keep it simple.
  • Practice continuous improvement.
  • Respond to change.
  • Self-organize.
  • Focus on people.
  • Enjoy

Provide Continuous Feedback

  • Continuous feedback is the key to agile testing success. By providing feedback we can improve and not make the same mistakes again and again. The main aim is to learn from your mistakes. Testers should help product owners or customers visualize requirements for the stories. Their feedbacks helps in designing the test cases early in the software life cycle. As retrospectives are an important part of the Agile process, providing feedback in it is also helpful. It is one of the most important principles for Agile testers.

Deliver Value to the Customer

  • As a tester, it’s your responsibility to tell customers which really is an important function and which is not. The testers help them identify the main functionality instead of just some cool features. The main focus is to try and deliver critical functionality and enhance it later. Critical functionalities should be worked on first as after seeing them implemented, customers can see what enhancements they want. Testing should work on corner cases but should not forget about the happy path of the service. As we get involved in testing it is possible to get involved in corner cases so much that we miss the core functionality. So, we need to maintain a balance between them.

Enable Face-to-Face Communication

  • Good communication is the key to success. Agile’s success is totally dependent upon communication. Whether it is between customer and developer or between developers and the testers all communication is very important. Testers should look for unique ways to communicate. Teams may be working in geographically divided. But it should not hinder communications between the teams.
  • Testers should never get in the way of any direct customer-developer communication but should help to make sure that communication happens. If a tester finds out that the developer has some confusion regarding the requirements. It’s the responsibility of the tester to set up a meeting between the developer and the business.
  • The testers understand the story from the customer’s perspective and from the developers’ technical angle as well. The tester should be able to communicate both ways, that’s why it’s in testers’ best interest to be good at communicating, as they need to do it more than any other team member. Testers act as a bridge between customers and developers.

Have Courage

  • The testers should have the courage to speak their minds. They should not be intimidated by anyone. If they find any issue they should report it. If they see any gap in the business requirements they should discuss it.
  • The testers should be comfortable in asking customers for examples or developers for help. Asking for examples is the best way for getting the real-world use case of the services. In Agile anyone can perform any task. So, a developer can help a tester in testing some particular scenario. And a tester can help the developers in debugging an issue ass well.
  • Testers should not be scared to fail but should learn from their mistake. It’s natural to make some mistakes but we should always learn from them and improve ourselves.

#api testing #integration testing #quality assurance (qa) #testing #unit testing #agile #agile teams #agile transformation #agiledeveloper #automation #automation testing #testing skills

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Ten Principles For Agile Testers
Madyson  Reilly

Madyson Reilly

1602931740

Kick-Off Your Agile Team With A Working Agreement Workshop

The canvas, created by Avi Schneier and the Scrum Inc team [1], encourages the team to ask questions that go to the heart of team dynamics, from the norms and guidelines they agree to abide by, to the skills they bring to the table and the skills they want to learn from each other, to how they celebrate success and learn from failure. In this article, I will discuss how I adapted Avi’s original canvas to the needs of the teams I was coaching, elaborate on the different elements of a working agreement, and share with you a step-by-step guide to facilitating collaborative working agreement development workshops.

The 8 Canvas Blocks In a Glance:

Team Name and Motto:

Having a team name that all team members can identify with is one aspect of establishing the team’s unique identity. A Team name should be created (and agreed on) by the team on their own. There are many anecdotal accounts[2] about how coming together under a common team name helps the team run much more smoothly and efficiently (Plus, it’s fun to come up with a great team name together!) In a recent working agreement canvas workshop I facilitated, and since there were so many Harry Potter fans in the group, they chose to be called _Team Slytherin. _You should’ve heard the laughs as they attempted to come up with that name!

The Motto is the team’s catch-phrase. Some teams opt for something that captures in a few words what they consider the essence of good teamwork, while others prefer something more tongue-in-cheek. I love to observe the dynamic of a team and how they learn more about each other’s personalities as they try to come up with a motto.

#devops #agile adoption #agile teams #agile and devops #agile adaptation #agile practices #agile application delivery #agile culture #agile applications #agile product development

Maud  Rosenbaum

Maud Rosenbaum

1603305660

Identifying Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) As Part of Your Agile Project Inception

NFRs:

In addition to the customer value-adding Epics and User stories you typically brainstorm in story writing workshops, the team needs to consider & plan for how to meet critical non-functional requirements that are also essential to the success of the product. These include things like performance, security, reliability, etc. To truly differentiate your product from the competition, think about NFRs not merely as compliance must-haves, but as distinguishing factors and essential contributors to the value proposition of the product. A big part of why our product is superior to the competition could be because it is more secure, more reliable, faster, etc.

NFRs include things like performance, flexibility, usability, maintainability, audit, logging, data migration, availability, reliability, recoverability, traffic/user volume, security, globalization/localization, etc.

In practice, we need to look at each of these non-functional requirements and answer 3 broad questions:

  • What is our _Definition of Success _for this NFR? Exploring this question is critical in order to determine how much time and effort we need to dedicate to this NFR.

Let us take usability as an example: here is an excerpt of the Definition of Success for the Usability NFR from a team I coached recently:

  1. the system should be accessible remotely via a virtual desktop
  2. users should be able to customize the user interface
  3. users should be able to use keyboard shortcuts to access frequently used features
  4. response time for the system should be <n seconds
  5. user should be able to have multiple instances of the system open at the same time
  6. the system should have a usability score on the System Usability Scale (SUS) of 68 or higher.

#devops #agile adoption #agile teams #agile and devops #agile adaptation #agile practices #agile application delivery #agile culture #agile applications #agile product development

Jamal  Lemke

Jamal Lemke

1603580400

Ten Principles For Agile Testers

In the previous blog we saw that what exactly is Agile testing and in this blog we will see in introduction to Principles For Agile Testers.

What is an Agile tester?

  • So get into the principles for Agile testers we first need to know what is an Agile tester? A professional tester who is not scared of change has knowledge about technical and business aspects as well and understands the concept of using tests to document requirements to drive development is an Agile tester.
  • Now let’s see what are in ten principles for Agile testers:
  • Provide continuous feedback.
  • Deliver value to the customer.
  • Enable face-to-face communication.
  • Have courage.
  • Keep it simple.
  • Practice continuous improvement.
  • Respond to change.
  • Self-organize.
  • Focus on people.
  • Enjoy

Provide Continuous Feedback

  • Continuous feedback is the key to agile testing success. By providing feedback we can improve and not make the same mistakes again and again. The main aim is to learn from your mistakes. Testers should help product owners or customers visualize requirements for the stories. Their feedbacks helps in designing the test cases early in the software life cycle. As retrospectives are an important part of the Agile process, providing feedback in it is also helpful. It is one of the most important principles for Agile testers.

Deliver Value to the Customer

  • As a tester, it’s your responsibility to tell customers which really is an important function and which is not. The testers help them identify the main functionality instead of just some cool features. The main focus is to try and deliver critical functionality and enhance it later. Critical functionalities should be worked on first as after seeing them implemented, customers can see what enhancements they want. Testing should work on corner cases but should not forget about the happy path of the service. As we get involved in testing it is possible to get involved in corner cases so much that we miss the core functionality. So, we need to maintain a balance between them.

Enable Face-to-Face Communication

  • Good communication is the key to success. Agile’s success is totally dependent upon communication. Whether it is between customer and developer or between developers and the testers all communication is very important. Testers should look for unique ways to communicate. Teams may be working in geographically divided. But it should not hinder communications between the teams.
  • Testers should never get in the way of any direct customer-developer communication but should help to make sure that communication happens. If a tester finds out that the developer has some confusion regarding the requirements. It’s the responsibility of the tester to set up a meeting between the developer and the business.
  • The testers understand the story from the customer’s perspective and from the developers’ technical angle as well. The tester should be able to communicate both ways, that’s why it’s in testers’ best interest to be good at communicating, as they need to do it more than any other team member. Testers act as a bridge between customers and developers.

Have Courage

  • The testers should have the courage to speak their minds. They should not be intimidated by anyone. If they find any issue they should report it. If they see any gap in the business requirements they should discuss it.
  • The testers should be comfortable in asking customers for examples or developers for help. Asking for examples is the best way for getting the real-world use case of the services. In Agile anyone can perform any task. So, a developer can help a tester in testing some particular scenario. And a tester can help the developers in debugging an issue ass well.
  • Testers should not be scared to fail but should learn from their mistake. It’s natural to make some mistakes but we should always learn from them and improve ourselves.

#api testing #integration testing #quality assurance (qa) #testing #unit testing #agile #agile teams #agile transformation #agiledeveloper #automation #automation testing #testing skills

Maud  Rosenbaum

Maud Rosenbaum

1604141220

How To Develop Situational Awareness As a New Agile Coach or Scrum Master

Picture this: You’re a Scrum Master or Agile Coach who was brought in to assist a team embarking on a large and complex project. You’re new to the organization, perhaps even to the line of business they’re in. You feel like you need to get up to speed quickly so that you can start contributing effectively, and your years of experience have taught you that every organization and every team is unique. You understand that for you to truly create value, you need to capture the unique context of the team and organization you’re now supporting – that is, you need to develop _situational awareness. _You need to understand what it means to be where you are, the people with whom you are working, and the history, people dynamics, complexity, and many other nuances of the team and organization.

And to be clear, here I’m not talking about project Inception/Inception Sprint/Sprint 0/Project Kick-off, etc. All of that comes later. Rather, the focus of this article is YOU – ensuring that YOU have a systematic way of acquiring, analyzing, and compartmentalizing the information you need in order to understand your surroundings well enough so that you can start contributing effectively to your new team and organization.

This effort to develop a broad understanding of your new environment could also help you (and your team) design a fit-for-purpose project initiation (inception/kick-off) process that leverages what has already been done in the past to develop a shared understanding of what needs to be done in the future and identify areas where the team needs to pay special attention. Have there been customer interviews conducted in the past as part of an effort to envision what an enhanced version of the existing product would look like? Were there any agile success stories from other projects in the organization that could be used as part of your ‘hearts and minds’ campaign to help foster an agile culture and mindset? Have there been any efforts to map the end-to-end flow of work as things stand now? Etc. Content that has already been developed - perhaps for different purposes, be it maps, artifacts, retrospective summaries, etc. could streamline many activities during project kickoff and throughout the project.

#devops #agile adoption #agile and devops #agile adaptation #agile application delivery #agile team #scrum adoption #agile product development

Appsinvo : Principles & Benefits of Agile Testing Methodology

The complexity of the mobile app development process in fostering consistently. The software testing procedures require growing and to stay up with various methods. Read More at : https://www.appsinvo.com/blog/principles-benefits-of-agile-testing-methodology/

#agile testing methodology #agile testing principle #benefits of agile testing methodology #what is agile testing methodology #appsinvo blog