Flutter to build iOS & Android Apps 👏👏👏

Flutter to build iOS & Android Apps 👏👏👏

Flutter to build iOS & Android Apps - Flutter is Google’s portable UI toolkit for building beautiful, natively-compiled applications for mobile, web, and desktop from a single codebase...

Flutter to build iOS & Android Apps - Flutter is Google’s portable UI toolkit for building beautiful, natively-compiled applications for mobile, web, and desktop from a single codebase...

Flutter is developed by Google and its first preview 1 released 2017 and get large user attention across the world.### What is Flutter ?

**Flutter **is an open-source, multi-platform mobile SDK which can be used to build iOS and Android apps with the same source code. What separates it from other cross platform frameworks like React Native and Xamarin is that is does not use the native widgets, nor does it use WebViews.

Instead, Flutter has its own rendering engine written in C/C++, while the Dart code that is used to actually write Flutter apps can be compiled into native code on each platform.

1. One Code for 2 Platforms

Developers write just one codebase for your 2 apps, covering both Android and iOS platforms. Flutter doesn’t depend on the platform, because it has its own widgets and designs. This means that you have the same app on two platforms.

2. Development Time

Flutter means faster & more dynamic mobile app development. We can make changes in the code and see them straight away in the app! This is the so-called Hot reload, which usually only takes (milli)seconds and helps teams add features, fix bugs and experiment faster.

3. Beautiful User Interface

Flutter is designed to make it easy to create your own widgets or customize the existing widgets. Your new app will look the same, even on old versions of Android and iOS systems. There are no additional costs for supporting older devices. Flutter runs on Android Jelly Bean or newer, as well as iOS 8 or newer.

4. Performance

Flutter is concerned, you get everything customised right of your choice. Developers can use the same existing code to develop applications. Importantly, Flutter is helpful in this context as it is backed by the Powerful C++ engine.

5. Documentation & Tools

The flutter.dev site is well designed and it was easy to get started. The Flutter plugin was easy to install and worked as advertised. After following the simple tutorial, I had my first Flutter native application running on an iOS simulator and the Android emulator quickly enough. The experience was good enough to think this might be worth really pursuing.

6. Technical architecture

Although Flutter and Android are being developed at Google, the technical architecture of both platforms is completely different. Flutter uses Dart as the programming language, while native Android development uses Java or Kotlin.

Architectural overview: platform channels

Flutter uses the Dart framework and often does not require the bridge to communicate with the native modules. The architecture of the Flutter engine is explained in detail. (click here)

F

lutter is aimed at mobile app developers of any level. And current Flutter version can boast about the following advantages:

React Native vs Flutter

Developers keep discussing the trending technology and React Native vs Flutter.
Both React native and Flutter holds some exceptional quality in respective fields. But, while going through the topic, one can say that React Native is a bit friendly than Flutter.

At the same time, there has been plenty of new technologies which help both users and service providers to optimize services, based on the user demands.

The reason, Flutter is extremely new and still going through under development process. Therefore, it will be immature to get a final conclusion that React Native will remain the best forever. It may be changed.

Conclusion

The thing that I’ve found positively surprising is that we have communicated that developing applications in Flutter is much faster than native.> Flutter is a unique take on these tools because it doesn’t require using platform native widgets or WebViews. One of the main drawbacks of adopting Flutter right now is the lack of third party support for features. However, Flutter is still a promising tool for writing great looking cross platform apps without having to sacrifice performance.

Flutter Grocery Shopping Mobile App

Flutter Grocery Shopping Mobile App

This Flutter grocery app is a pro version that has all features of online grocery purchase for your customers.

FLUTTER GROCERY APP
Are you looking to launch your online grocery shop or any E-Commerce mobile app then this flutter grocery app will help you to build the app in just days? We offer an online grocery software system. The mobile application offers amazing features to build a powerful online ordering system or app for your grocery shop. It enhances online home grocery stuffs ordering experience for your customers with your mobile grocery app. This Flutter grocery app is a fully functional mobile app that has all features of online grocery purchase for your customers. So what are you waiting for? Start your online business with your Mobile app today!

YOu check live demo and feature video at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0bn_3Uu2u0

Flutter App Development Company | Hire Flutter App Developers

When it comes to Hybrid Mobile App Development Framework, Flutter is gaining the momentum. And, we as top development company don't hesitate to say that it is going to be future cross-platform mobile app development. Though there are few other frameworks available for cross-platform and hybrid mobile app development, Flutter is an increasing trend. In fact, intellectuals are comparing Flutter vs. React Native vs. Ionic and finding the best solutions out of them. Some of the top companies have already adapted Flutter, and they are very positive about it.

When it comes to Hybrid Mobile App Development Framework, Flutter is gaining the momentum. And, we as top development company don't hesitate to say that it is going to be future cross-platform mobile app development. Though there are few other frameworks available for cross-platform and hybrid mobile app development, Flutter is an increasing trend. In fact, intellectuals are comparing Flutter vs. React Native vs. Ionic and finding the best solutions out of them. Some of the top companies have already adapted Flutter, and they are very positive about it.


Flutter is the future of mobile app development 👏👏👏

Flutter is the future of mobile app development 👏👏👏

Flutter is a new mobile app SDK to help developers and designers build modern mobile apps for iOS and Android.” The modern, reactive ...🎁🎁🎁🎁

Flutter is a new mobile app SDK to help developers and designers build modern mobile apps for iOS and Android.” The modern, reactive ...

I dabbled a bit in Android and iOS development quite a few years back using Java and Objective-C. After spending about a month working with both of them, I decided to move on. I just couldn’t get into it.

But recently, I learned about Flutter and decided to give mobile app development another shot. I instantly fell in love with it as it made developing multi-platform apps a ton of fun. Since learning about it, I’ve created an app and a library using it. Flutter seems to be a very promising step forward and I’d like to explain a few different reasons why I believe this.

Powered by Dart

Flutter uses the Google-developed Dart language. If you’ve used Java before, you’ll be fairly familiar with the syntax of Dart as they are quite similar. Besides the syntax, Dart is a fairly different language.

I’m not going to be talking about Dart in depth as it’s a bit out of scope, but I’d like to discuss one of the most helpful features in my opinion. This feature being support for asynchronous operations. Not only does Dart support it, but it makes it exceptionally easy.

This is something you’ll most likely be using throughout all of your Flutter applications if you’re doing IO or other time-consuming operations such as querying a database. Without asynchronous operations, any time-consuming operations will cause the program to freeze up until they complete. To prevent this, Dart provides us with the async and await keywords which allow our program to continue execution while waiting for these longer operations to complete.

Let's take a look at a couple of examples: one without asynchronous operations and one with.

// Without asynchronous operations
	import 'dart:async';
	

	main() {
	    longOperation();
	    printSomething();
	}
	

	longOperation() {
	    Duration delay = Duration(seconds: 3);
	    Future.delayed(delay);
	    print('Waited 3 seconds to print this and blocked execution.');
	}
	

	printSomething() {
	    print('That sure took a while!');
	}

And the output:

3 seconds to print this and blocked execution.
That sure took a while!

This isn’t ideal. No one wants to use an app that freezes up when it executes long operations. So let’s modify this a bit and make use of the async and await keywords.

// With asynchronous operations
	import 'dart:async';
	

	main() {
	    longOperation();
	    printSomething();
	}
	

	Future<void> longOperation() async {
	    var retVal = await runLongOperation();
	

	    print(retVal);
	}
	

	const retString = 'Waited 3 seconds to return this without blocking execution.';
	Duration delay = Duration(seconds: 3);
	

	Future<String> runLongOperation() => Future.delayed(delay, () => retString);
	

	printSomething() {
	    print('I printed right away!');
	}

And the output once again:

I printed right away!
Waited 3 seconds to return this without blocking execution.

Thanks to asynchronous operations, we’re able to execute code that takes a while to complete without blocking the execution of the rest of our code.

Write Once, Run on Android and iOS

Developing mobile apps can take a lot of time considering you need to use a different codebase for Android and iOS. That is unless you use an SDK like Flutter, where you have a single codebase that allows you to build your app for both operating systems. Not only that, but you can run them completely natively. This means things such as scrolling and navigation, to name a few, act just like they should for the OS being used.

To keep with the theme of simplicity, as long as you have a device or simulator running, Flutter makes building and running your app for testing as simple as clicking a button.

UI Development

UI development is one of those things that I almost never look forward to. I’m more of a backend developer, so when it comes to working on something that is heavily dependent on it, I want something simple. This is where Flutter shines in my eyes.

UI is created by combining different widgets together and modifying them to fit the look of your app. You have near full control over how these widgets display, so you’ll always end up with exactly what you’re looking for. For laying out the UI, you have widgets such as Row, Column, and Container. For content, you have widgets like Text and RaisedButton. This is only a few of the widgets Flutter offers, there are a lot more. Using these widgets, we can build a very simple UI:

@override
	Widget build(BuildContext context) {
	    return Scaffold(
	        appBar: AppBar(
	            title: Text('Flutter App'),
	            centerTitle: true,
	            elevation: 0,
	        ),
	        body: Row(
	            mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
	            children: [
	                Column(
	                    mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
	                    children: [
	                        Container(
	                            child: Text('Some text'),
	                        ),
	                        Container(
	                            child: RaisedButton(
	                                onPressed: () {
	                                    // Do something on press
	                                },
	                                child: Text('PRESS ME'),
	                            ),
	                        ),
	                    ],
	                ),
	            ],
	        ),
	    );
	}

Flutter has more tricks up its sleeve that makes theming your app a breeze. You could go through and manually change the fonts, colors, and looks for everything one by one, but that takes way too long. Instead, Flutter provides us with something called ThemeData that allows us to set values for colors, fonts, input fields, and much more. This feature is great for keeping the look of your app consistent.

theme: ThemeData(
	    brightness: Brightness.dark,
	    canvasColor: Colors.grey[900],
	    primarySwatch: Colors.teal,
	    primaryColor: Colors.teal[500],
	    fontFamily: 'Helvetica',
	    primaryTextTheme: Typography.whiteCupertino.copyWith(
	        display4: TextStyle(
	            color: Colors.white,
	            fontSize: 36,
	        ),
	    ),
	),

With this ThemeData, we set the apps colors, font family, and some text styles. Everything besides the text styles will automatically be applied app-wide. Text styles have to be set manually for each text widget, but it's still simple:

child: Text(
	   'Some text',
	   style: Theme.of(context).primaryTextTheme.display4,
),

To make things even more efficient, Flutter can hot reload apps so you don’t need to restart it every time you make a change to the UI. You can now make a change, save it, then see the change within a second or so.

Libraries

Flutter provides a lot of great features out of the box, but there are times when you need a bit more than it offers. This is no problem at all considering the extensive number of libraries available for Dart and Flutter. Interested in putting ads in your app? There’s a library for that. Want new widgets? There are libraries for that.

If you’re more of a do-it-yourselfer, make your own library and share it with the rest of the community in no time at all. Adding libraries to your project is simple and can be done by adding a single line to your pubspec.yaml file. For example, if you wanted to add the sqflite library:

dependencies:
 flutter:
  sdk: flutter
 sqflite: ^1.0.0

After adding it to the file, run flutter packages get and you're good to go. Libraries make developing Flutter apps a breeze and save a lot of time during development.

Backend Development

Most apps nowadays depend on some sort of data, and that data needs to be stored somewhere so it can be displayed and worked with later on. So keeping this in mind when looking to create apps with a new SDK, such as Flutter, is important.

Once again, Flutter apps are made using Dart, and Dart is great when it comes to backend development. I’ve talked a lot about simplicity in this article, and backend development with Dart and Flutter is no exception to this. It’s incredibly simple to create data-driven apps, for beginners and experts alike, but this simplicity by no means equates to a lack of quality.

To tie this in with the previous section, libraries are available so you can work with the database of your choosing. Using the sqflite library, we can be up and running with an SQLite database fairly quickly. And thanks to singletons, we can access the database and query it from practically anywhere without needing to recreate an object every single time.

class DBProvider {
	    // Singleton
	    DBProvider._();
	

	    // Static object to provide us access from practically anywhere
	    static final DBProvider db = DBProvider._();
	    Database _database;
	

	    Future<Database> get database async {
	        if (_database != null) {
	            return _database;
	        }
	

	        _database = await initDB();
	        return _database;
	    }
	

	    initDB() async {
	        // Retrieve your app's directory, then create a path to a database for your app.
	        Directory documentsDir = await getApplicationDocumentsDirectory();
	        String path = join(documentsDir.path, 'money_clip.db');
	

	        return await openDatabase(path, version: 1, onOpen: (db) async {
	            // Do something when the database is opened
	        }, onCreate: (Database db, int version) async {
	            // Do something, such as creating tables, when the database is first created.
	            // If the database already exists, this will not be called.
	        }
	    }
	}

After retrieving data from a database, you can convert that to an object using a model. Or if you want to store an object in the database, you can convert it to JSON using the same model.

class User {
	    int id;
	    String name;
	

	    User({
	        this.id,
	        this.name,
	    });
	

	    factory User.fromJson(Map<String, dynamic> json) => new User(
	        id: json['id'],
	        name: json['name'],
	    );
	

	    Map<String, dynamic> toJson() => {
	        'id': id,
	        'name': name,
	    };
}

This data isn’t all that useful without a way to display it to the user. This is where Flutter comes in with widgets such as the FutureBuilder or StreamBuilder. If you're interested in a more in-depth look at creating data-driven apps using Flutter, SQLite, and other technologies, I encourage you to check out the article I wrote on that:

https://medium.com/@erigitic/using-streams-blocs-and-sqlite-in-flutter-2e59e1f7cdce

Final Thoughts

With Flutter, the possibilities are practically endless, so even super extensive apps can be created with ease. If you develop mobile apps and have yet to give Flutter a try, I highly recommend you do as I’m sure you’ll fall in love with it as well. After using Flutter for quite a few months, I think it’s safe to say that it’s the future of mobile development. If not, it’s definitely a step in the right direction.