Jamison  Fisher

Jamison Fisher

1642857360

PyCon Pandas: PyCon Pandas Tutorial Materials

Welcome to Brandon’s Pandas Tutorial

The first instance of this tutorial was delivered at PyCon 2015 in Montréal, but I hope that many other people will be able to benefit from it over the next few years — both on occasions on which I myself get to deliver it, and also when other instructors are able to do so.

If you want to follow along with the tutorial at home, here is the YouTube recording of the 3-hour tutorial at PyCon itself:

Watch the video tutorial on YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JnMutdy6Fw

To make it useful to as many people as possible, I hereby release it under the MIT license (see the accompanying LICENSE.txt file) and I have tried to make sure that this repository contains all of the scripts needed to download and set up the data set that we used.

Quick Start

If you have both conda and git on your system (otherwise, read the next section for more detailed instructions):

$ conda install --yes jupyter matplotlib pandas
$ git clone https://github.com/brandon-rhodes/pycon-pandas-tutorial.git
$ cd pycon-pandas-tutorial
$ build/BUILD.sh
$ ipython notebook

Detailed Instructions

You will need Pandas, the IPython Notebook, and Matplotlib installed before you can successfully run the tutorial notebooks. The Anaconda Distribution is a great way to get up and running quickly without having to install them each separately — running the conda command shown above will install all three.

Note that having git is not necessary for getting the materials. Simply click the “Download ZIP” button over on the right-hand side of this repository’s front page at the following link, and its files will be delivered to you as a ZIP archive:

https://github.com/brandon-rhodes/pycon-pandas-tutorial

Once you have unpacked the ZIP file, download the following four IMDB data files and place them in the tutorial’s build directory:

If the above links don’t work for you, try these alternate sources of the same files:

To convert these into the CSV files that the tutorial needs, run the BUILD.py script with either Python 2 or Python 3. It will create the three CSV files in the data directory that you need to run all of the tutorial examples. It should take about 5 minutes to run on a fast modern machine:

$ python build/BUILD.py

You can then start up the IPython Notebook and start looking at the notebooks:

$ ipython notebook

I hope that the recording and the exercises in this repository prove useful if you are interested in learning more about Python and its data analysis capabilities!

Brandon Rhodes

Download Details:
Author: brandon-rhodes
Source Code: https://github.com/brandon-rhodes/pycon-pandas-tutorial
License: MIT License

#pandas  #python 

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PyCon Pandas: PyCon Pandas Tutorial Materials

Data Transformation in Pandas

In my previous post, I mentioned missing data  in Pandas library. I will talk about data transformation in this post. After loading the data set, we must make it suitable for analysis. This process is called data transformation.

Before starting the topic, our Medium page includes posts on data science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning. Please don’t forget to follow us on Medium 🌱 to see these posts and the latest posts.

Let’s get started.

#pandas-dataframe #pandas-tutorial #python-pandas-tutorial #data-transformation #python-pandas

Udit Vashisht

1586702221

Python Pandas Objects - Pandas Series and Pandas Dataframe

In this post, we will learn about pandas’ data structures/objects. Pandas provide two type of data structures:-

Pandas Series

Pandas Series is a one dimensional indexed data, which can hold datatypes like integer, string, boolean, float, python object etc. A Pandas Series can hold only one data type at a time. The axis label of the data is called the index of the series. The labels need not to be unique but must be a hashable type. The index of the series can be integer, string and even time-series data. In general, Pandas Series is nothing but a column of an excel sheet with row index being the index of the series.

Pandas Dataframe

Pandas dataframe is a primary data structure of pandas. Pandas dataframe is a two-dimensional size mutable array with both flexible row indices and flexible column names. In general, it is just like an excel sheet or SQL table. It can also be seen as a python’s dict-like container for series objects.

#python #python-pandas #pandas-dataframe #pandas-series #pandas-tutorial

Combining And Merging Datasets in Pandas

In my last post, I mentioned hierarchical indexing in Pandas library. I will talk about combining and merging datasets in this post. Sometimes, datasets come from different sources. When analyzing data, we may want to combine these datasets. Let’s show how to combine and merge datasets.

Before starting the topic, our Medium page includes posts on data science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning. Please don’t forget to follow us on Medium 🌱 to see these posts and the latest posts.

Let’s get started.

#python-pandas #pandas-tutorial #pandas-dataframe #data-preprocessing #python-pandas-tutorial

Willie  Beier

Willie Beier

1596728880

Tutorial: Getting Started with R and RStudio

In this tutorial we’ll learn how to begin programming with R using RStudio. We’ll install R, and RStudio RStudio, an extremely popular development environment for R. We’ll learn the key RStudio features in order to start programming in R on our own.

If you already know how to use RStudio and want to learn some tips, tricks, and shortcuts, check out this Dataquest blog post.

Table of Contents

#data science tutorials #beginner #r tutorial #r tutorials #rstats #tutorial #tutorials

Tutorial: Loading and Cleaning Data with R and the tidyverse

1. Characteristics of Clean Data and Messy Data

What exactly is clean data? Clean data is accurate, complete, and in a format that is ready to analyze. Characteristics of clean data include data that are:

  • Free of duplicate rows/values
  • Error-free (e.g. free of misspellings)
  • Relevant (e.g. free of special characters)
  • The appropriate data type for analysis
  • Free of outliers (or only contain outliers have been identified/understood), and
  • Follows a “tidy data” structure

Common symptoms of messy data include data that contain:

  • Special characters (e.g. commas in numeric values)
  • Numeric values stored as text/character data types
  • Duplicate rows
  • Misspellings
  • Inaccuracies
  • White space
  • Missing data
  • Zeros instead of null values

2. Motivation

In this blog post, we will work with five property-sales datasets that are publicly available on the New York City Department of Finance Rolling Sales Data website. We encourage you to download the datasets and follow along! Each file contains one year of real estate sales data for one of New York City’s five boroughs. We will work with the following Microsoft Excel files:

  • rollingsales_bronx.xls
  • rollingsales_brooklyn.xls
  • rollingsales_manhattan.xls
  • rollingsales_queens.xls
  • rollingsales_statenisland.xls

As we work through this blog post, imagine that you are helping a friend launch their home-inspection business in New York City. You offer to help them by analyzing the data to better understand the real-estate market. But you realize that before you can analyze the data in R, you will need to diagnose and clean it first. And before you can diagnose the data, you will need to load it into R!

3. Load Data into R with readxl

Benefits of using tidyverse tools are often evident in the data-loading process. In many cases, the tidyverse package readxl will clean some data for you as Microsoft Excel data is loaded into R. If you are working with CSV data, the tidyverse readr package function read_csv() is the function to use (we’ll cover that later).

Let’s look at an example. Here’s how the Excel file for the Brooklyn borough looks:

The Brooklyn Excel file

Now let’s load the Brooklyn dataset into R from an Excel file. We’ll use the readxlpackage. We specify the function argument skip = 4 because the row that we want to use as the header (i.e. column names) is actually row 5. We can ignore the first four rows entirely and load the data into R beginning at row 5. Here’s the code:

library(readxl) # Load Excel files
brooklyn <- read_excel("rollingsales_brooklyn.xls", skip = 4)

Note we saved this dataset with the variable name brooklyn for future use.

4. View the Data with tidyr::glimpse()

The tidyverse offers a user-friendly way to view this data with the glimpse() function that is part of the tibble package. To use this package, we will need to load it for use in our current session. But rather than loading this package alone, we can load many of the tidyverse packages at one time. If you do not have the tidyverse collection of packages, install it on your machine using the following command in your R or R Studio session:

install.packages("tidyverse")

Once the package is installed, load it to memory:

library(tidyverse)

Now that tidyverse is loaded into memory, take a “glimpse” of the Brooklyn dataset:

glimpse(brooklyn)
## Observations: 20,185
## Variables: 21
## $ BOROUGH <chr> "3", "3", "3", "3", "3", "3", "…
## $ NEIGHBORHOOD <chr> "BATH BEACH", "BATH BEACH", "BA…
## $ `BUILDING CLASS CATEGORY` <chr> "01 ONE FAMILY DWELLINGS", "01 …
## $ `TAX CLASS AT PRESENT` <chr> "1", "1", "1", "1", "1", "1", "…
## $ BLOCK <dbl> 6359, 6360, 6364, 6367, 6371, 6…
## $ LOT <dbl> 70, 48, 74, 24, 19, 32, 65, 20,…
## $ `EASE-MENT` <lgl> NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA,…
## $ `BUILDING CLASS AT PRESENT` <chr> "S1", "A5", "A5", "A9", "A9", "…
## $ ADDRESS <chr> "8684 15TH AVENUE", "14 BAY 10T…
## $ `APARTMENT NUMBER` <chr> NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA,…
## $ `ZIP CODE` <dbl> 11228, 11228, 11214, 11214, 112…
## $ `RESIDENTIAL UNITS` <dbl> 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1…
## $ `COMMERCIAL UNITS` <dbl> 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0…
## $ `TOTAL UNITS` <dbl> 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1…
## $ `LAND SQUARE FEET` <dbl> 1933, 2513, 2492, 1571, 2320, 3…
## $ `GROSS SQUARE FEET` <dbl> 4080, 1428, 972, 1456, 1566, 22…
## $ `YEAR BUILT` <dbl> 1930, 1930, 1950, 1935, 1930, 1…
## $ `TAX CLASS AT TIME OF SALE` <chr> "1", "1", "1", "1", "1", "1", "…
## $ `BUILDING CLASS AT TIME OF SALE` <chr> "S1", "A5", "A5", "A9", "A9", "…
## $ `SALE PRICE` <dbl> 1300000, 849000, 0, 830000, 0, …
## $ `SALE DATE` <dttm> 2020-04-28, 2020-03-18, 2019-0…

The glimpse() function provides a user-friendly way to view the column names and data types for all columns, or variables, in the data frame. With this function, we are also able to view the first few observations in the data frame. This data frame has 20,185 observations, or property sales records. And there are 21 variables, or columns.

#data science tutorials #beginner #r #r tutorial #r tutorials #rstats #tidyverse #tutorial #tutorials