The Tech Behind Axis Bank’s Multilingual Voice Bot

Understanding the ever-changing customer aspirations and requirements will always be a challenge. However, the larger issue at hand lies in to bring the customers at par with the adoption of digital technology. The COVID era has emulated a significant impact at different levels of the organisation across businesses. The scenario at Axis Bank was no different as the status quo, and modus operandi across the bank was challenged during the initial phase of lockdown.

Read more: https://analyticsindiamag.com/the-tech-behind-axis-banks-multilingual-voice-bot/

#chatbot #artificial-intelligence #autonomus #customercare #axisbank #digitisation

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The Tech Behind Axis Bank’s Multilingual Voice Bot
Eve  Klocko

Eve Klocko

1598874480

The Tech Behind Axis Bank’s Multilingual Voice Bot

Understanding the ever-changing customer aspirations and requirements will always be a challenge. However, the larger issue at hand lies in to bring the customers at par with the adoption of digital technology. The COVID era has emulated a significant impact at different levels of the organisation across businesses. The scenario at Axis Bank was no different as the status quo, and modus operandi across the bank was challenged during the initial phase of lockdown.

The bank has observed extreme spikes in volumes, increment in complaints and escalations transpired by customer anxiety, which was a repercussion of limited services to customers during the lockdown phase. This reflected in Axis Bank’s customer experience index and the cross-functional service levels of the organisation. And thus, it became critical for the bank to re-define their role in the life of their customers by elevating their digital banking experiences to new domains of customer service.

#opinions #axis bank voice bot #conversational ai #vernacular #voice bot #ai

Mike  Kozey

Mike Kozey

1656151740

Test_cov_console: Flutter Console Coverage Test

Flutter Console Coverage Test

This small dart tools is used to generate Flutter Coverage Test report to console

How to install

Add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dev_dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

How to run

run the following command to make sure all flutter library is up-to-date

flutter pub get
Running "flutter pub get" in coverage...                            0.5s

run the following command to generate lcov.info on coverage directory

flutter test --coverage
00:02 +1: All tests passed!

run the tool to generate report from lcov.info

flutter pub run test_cov_console
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
 print_cov_constants.dart                    |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Optional parameter

If not given a FILE, "coverage/lcov.info" will be used.
-f, --file=<FILE>                      The target lcov.info file to be reported
-e, --exclude=<STRING1,STRING2,...>    A list of contains string for files without unit testing
                                       to be excluded from report
-l, --line                             It will print Lines & Uncovered Lines only
                                       Branch & Functions coverage percentage will not be printed
-i, --ignore                           It will not print any file without unit testing
-m, --multi                            Report from multiple lcov.info files
-c, --csv                              Output to CSV file
-o, --output=<CSV-FILE>                Full path of output CSV file
                                       If not given, "coverage/test_cov_console.csv" will be used
-t, --total                            Print only the total coverage
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-p, --pass=<MINIMUM>                   Print only the whether total coverage is passed MINIMUM value or not
                                       If the value >= MINIMUM, it will print PASSED, otherwise FAILED
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-h, --help                             Show this help

example run the tool with parameters

flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

report for multiple lcov.info files (-m, --multi)

It support to run for multiple lcov.info files with the followings directory structures:
1. No root module
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
2. With root module
<root>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/lib/src
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
You must run test_cov_console on <root> dir, and the report would be grouped by module, here is
the sample output for directory structure 'with root module':
flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock --multi
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_a -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_b -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Output to CSV file (-c, --csv, -o, --output)

flutter pub run test_cov_console -c --output=coverage/test_coverage.csv

#### sample CSV output file:
File,% Branch,% Funcs,% Lines,Uncovered Line #s
lib/,,,,
test_cov_console.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
lib/src/,,,,
parser.dart,100.00,100.00,97.22,"97"
parser_constants.dart,100.00,100.00,100.00,""
print_cov.dart,100.00,100.00,82.91,"29,49,51,52,171,174,177,180,183,184,185,186,187,188,279,324,325,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,398"
print_cov_constants.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
All files with unit testing,100.00,100.00,86.07,""

Installing

Use this package as an executable

Install it

You can install the package from the command line:

dart pub global activate test_cov_console

Use it

The package has the following executables:

$ test_cov_console

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Dart:

 $ dart pub add test_cov_console

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add test_cov_console

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):

dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

Alternatively, your editor might support dart pub get or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:test_cov_console/test_cov_console.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(MyApp());
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  // This widget is the root of your application.
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      theme: ThemeData(
        // This is the theme of your application.
        //
        // Try running your application with "flutter run". You'll see the
        // application has a blue toolbar. Then, without quitting the app, try
        // changing the primarySwatch below to Colors.green and then invoke
        // "hot reload" (press "r" in the console where you ran "flutter run",
        // or simply save your changes to "hot reload" in a Flutter IDE).
        // Notice that the counter didn't reset back to zero; the application
        // is not restarted.
        primarySwatch: Colors.blue,
        // This makes the visual density adapt to the platform that you run
        // the app on. For desktop platforms, the controls will be smaller and
        // closer together (more dense) than on mobile platforms.
        visualDensity: VisualDensity.adaptivePlatformDensity,
      ),
      home: MyHomePage(title: 'Flutter Demo Home Page'),
    );
  }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget {
  MyHomePage({Key? key, required this.title}) : super(key: key);

  // This widget is the home page of your application. It is stateful, meaning
  // that it has a State object (defined below) that contains fields that affect
  // how it looks.

  // This class is the configuration for the state. It holds the values (in this
  // case the title) provided by the parent (in this case the App widget) and
  // used by the build method of the State. Fields in a Widget subclass are
  // always marked "final".

  final String title;

  @override
  _MyHomePageState createState() => _MyHomePageState();
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  int _counter = 0;

  void _incrementCounter() {
    setState(() {
      // This call to setState tells the Flutter framework that something has
      // changed in this State, which causes it to rerun the build method below
      // so that the display can reflect the updated values. If we changed
      // _counter without calling setState(), then the build method would not be
      // called again, and so nothing would appear to happen.
      _counter++;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    // This method is rerun every time setState is called, for instance as done
    // by the _incrementCounter method above.
    //
    // The Flutter framework has been optimized to make rerunning build methods
    // fast, so that you can just rebuild anything that needs updating rather
    // than having to individually change instances of widgets.
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        // Here we take the value from the MyHomePage object that was created by
        // the App.build method, and use it to set our appbar title.
        title: Text(widget.title),
      ),
      body: Center(
        // Center is a layout widget. It takes a single child and positions it
        // in the middle of the parent.
        child: Column(
          // Column is also a layout widget. It takes a list of children and
          // arranges them vertically. By default, it sizes itself to fit its
          // children horizontally, and tries to be as tall as its parent.
          //
          // Invoke "debug painting" (press "p" in the console, choose the
          // "Toggle Debug Paint" action from the Flutter Inspector in Android
          // Studio, or the "Toggle Debug Paint" command in Visual Studio Code)
          // to see the wireframe for each widget.
          //
          // Column has various properties to control how it sizes itself and
          // how it positions its children. Here we use mainAxisAlignment to
          // center the children vertically; the main axis here is the vertical
          // axis because Columns are vertical (the cross axis would be
          // horizontal).
          mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
          children: <Widget>[
            Text(
              'You have pushed the button this many times:',
            ),
            Text(
              '$_counter',
              style: Theme.of(context).textTheme.headline4,
            ),
          ],
        ),
      ),
      floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
        onPressed: _incrementCounter,
        tooltip: 'Increment',
        child: Icon(Icons.add),
      ), // This trailing comma makes auto-formatting nicer for build methods.
    );
  }
}

Author: DigitalKatalis
Source Code: https://github.com/DigitalKatalis/test_cov_console 
License: BSD-3-Clause license

#flutter #dart #test 

Sival Alethea

Sival Alethea

1624410000

Create A Twitter Bot With Python

Create a Twitter bot with Python that tweets images or status updates at a set interval. The Python script also scrapes the web for data.

📺 The video in this post was made by freeCodeCamp.org
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8u-zJVVVhT4&list=PLWKjhJtqVAbnqBxcdjVGgT3uVR10bzTEB&index=14
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#python #a twitter bot #a twitter bot with python #bot #bot with python #create a twitter bot with python

The Tech Behind Axis Bank’s Multilingual Voice Bot

Understanding the ever-changing customer aspirations and requirements will always be a challenge. However, the larger issue at hand lies in to bring the customers at par with the adoption of digital technology. The COVID era has emulated a significant impact at different levels of the organisation across businesses. The scenario at Axis Bank was no different as the status quo, and modus operandi across the bank was challenged during the initial phase of lockdown.

Read more: https://analyticsindiamag.com/the-tech-behind-axis-banks-multilingual-voice-bot/

#chatbot #artificial-intelligence #autonomus #customercare #axisbank #digitisation

Banking App Development Cost - 8 Hidden Factors

Since 1994, Digital banking has been here. It is a very long time, but digital banking through mobile devices is entirely new to the banking industry. It all started when Atom became the first digital-only bank in the UK.

Nowadays, Tech-savvy customers expect corporations to support their digital movement, and because of this, almost every industry has adopted technologies to stay relevant with these modern customers. Most of the newbies who plan to develop a banking app have two questions in mind: “What is the cost of developing a banking application” and “Which hidden factors affect the cost of developing a banking app?”

You can get all the answers to these questions here, because this article will take you through the cost of developing a banking app, the features of banking apps, and much other pertinent information. After reading this, you will be able to plan better for your mobile banking app development. But before directly jumping into the cost of mobile banking app development, let’s take a look at the global digital payment market size of mobile banking.

Global Digital Payment Market Size

According to GlobalNewsWire, by 2026, the Global Digital Payment Market size is estimated to reach $175.8 billion, rising at a market growth of 20% CAGR during the forecast period.

Around 23% of millennials use mobile banking apps daily.
Around 49.2% of total smartphone users use mobile banking apps.
41% of Americans said that mobile banking apps had minimized their concerns about managing finances.

Banking app development cost

Data Source: Statista

As you can see, the data clearly indicates that the percentage of smartphone users are increasing day-by-day. Therefore, by engaging in your own mobile banking app development currently, you will be able to take advantage of the growth in mobile users. But, the cost of developing a banking application depends on so many factors like the platform, features, technologies, and so on.

Mobile banking app development cost

Cost of developing a banking app depends on various factors. To give you a rough idea of the mobile banking application development cost, the total development time for a fully-featured app sums to 3760 hours. Considering hourly rate for fintech projects of $25, the cost of developing a feature-loaded banking app stands around $94k.

Banking Application Development Cost depends on different phases such as:

  • Research and Planning
  • UI/UX Design
  • Development
  • Testing
  • Maintenance and Support

8 Hidden Factors of Costs of Mobile Banking App Development

1. Push Notifications

It’s not easy to imagine an app that does not utilize this necessary mobile capability. Push notifications always increase your users’ engagement with your mobile banking app and encourage the desired action. Push notifications are of three types:

  1. Transactional notifications notify users about their account updates.

  2. The Application-based notifications indicate when the mobile banking app requires the user’s attention, whether related to the password change requests or document submissions.

  3. Promotional notifications are to grab the attention of customers to offer discounts and attractive deals.

2. Chatbot Integration

For most users, mobile banking has a steep learning curve, and due to that, the customer will require immediate assistance on various occasions. Hence, creating a chatbot for customer service is the best way for many institutions to improve their customer service availability. The chatbots will save you a lot of time and money, whilst providing customer support 24/7. But this feature has a separate development process, and therefore you have to pay separately for this.

3. Servers

Servers are where your mobile banking app will be hosted. If you are not with the largest enterprises, you will want to outsource hosting from Amazon, Azure, or Google, which will result in more costs.

4. Content Delivery Network

A CDN is a system that is used to deliver content to the app based on the origin of the content, the content delivery server, and the geographic location of the particular user. In simple words, if you have users across the globe, and they have to keep coming back to one far off location to access the content, then the app will not perform in a good way. So, if you want your mobile banking app to perform effectively, you should use a content delivery network, because it reduces the app loading time and also increases the responsiveness of the app.

5. Development Tools

If you want to use paid deployment tools like iBuildApp, Appy Pie, and IBM MobileFirst, to develop your mobile banking apps, you will need to subscribe to them over the lifespan of your app. This will also affect your banking app development cost.

6. Android and iOS Updates

As we all know, both platforms constantly release updates, and those updates require maintenance. Depending on the extent of maintenance required, the cost in the long-term can sometimes be significant.

7. APIs

Every mobile app usually has multiple third-party APIs that they interact with, especially at the enterprise level. If you make changes to any of these applications, they will require periodic maintenance of your APIs. For instance, Facebook updated their API version four times in 2016; now, what if you want to integrate with Facebook? You will need to update your app to accommodate those changes.

8. Bugs

As you know, every app has bugs, and not even a single developer can assure you that there will be no bugs in the future in your app. It’s just that sometimes they go undiscovered for months or even years. User communities are not kind to apps that are slow to address the issues that they have reported.

Conclusion

The cost of banking application development not only depend on the features of the banking application, but they are also heavily affected by the hidden factors I have mentioned. The primary issue with mobile banking app development cost is the amount of individual components that you need to gather. Each of them can cost thousands of dollars, and these costs will continue throughout the lifespan of your app. However, the rewards that come from a successful mobile banking app development project are huge.

Pro Tip: The cost of developing a banking application greatly depends on the hourly rates of programmers and the expertise of the team. FinTech experts are able to complete these projects much more efficiently.

#banking app development cost #banking application development cost #cost of developing a banking app #cost of developing a banking application #mobile banking app development cost #mobile banking application development cost