Elian  Harber

Elian Harber

1664968920

Go-micro: A Go Microservices Framework

Go Micro

Go Micro is a framework for distributed systems development.

Overview

Go Micro provides the core requirements for distributed systems development including RPC and Event driven communication. The Go Micro philosophy is sane defaults with a pluggable architecture. We provide defaults to get you started quickly but everything can be easily swapped out.

Features

Go Micro abstracts away the details of distributed systems. Here are the main features.

Authentication - Auth is built in as a first class citizen. Authentication and authorization enable secure zero trust networking by providing every service an identity and certificates. This additionally includes rule based access control.

Dynamic Config - Load and hot reload dynamic config from anywhere. The config interface provides a way to load application level config from any source such as env vars, file, etcd. You can merge the sources and even define fallbacks.

Data Storage - A simple data store interface to read, write and delete records. It includes support for memory, file and CockroachDB by default. State and persistence becomes a core requirement beyond prototyping and Micro looks to build that into the framework.

Service Discovery - Automatic service registration and name resolution. Service discovery is at the core of micro service development. When service A needs to speak to service B it needs the location of that service. The default discovery mechanism is multicast DNS (mdns), a zeroconf system.

Load Balancing - Client side load balancing built on service discovery. Once we have the addresses of any number of instances of a service we now need a way to decide which node to route to. We use random hashed load balancing to provide even distribution across the services and retry a different node if there's a problem.

Message Encoding - Dynamic message encoding based on content-type. The client and server will use codecs along with content-type to seamlessly encode and decode Go types for you. Any variety of messages could be encoded and sent from different clients. The client and server handle this by default. This includes protobuf and json by default.

RPC Client/Server - RPC based request/response with support for bidirectional streaming. We provide an abstraction for synchronous communication. A request made to a service will be automatically resolved, load balanced, dialled and streamed.

Async Messaging - PubSub is built in as a first class citizen for asynchronous communication and event driven architectures. Event notifications are a core pattern in micro service development. The default messaging system is a HTTP event message broker.

Event Streaming - PubSub is great for async notifications but for more advanced use cases event streaming is preferred. Offering persistent storage, consuming from offsets and acking. Go Micro includes support for NATS Jetstream and Redis streams.

Synchronization - Distributed systems are often built in an eventually consistent manner. Support for distributed locking and leadership are built in as a Sync interface. When using an eventually consistent database or scheduling use the Sync interface.

Pluggable Interfaces - Go Micro makes use of Go interfaces for each distributed system abstraction. Because of this these interfaces are pluggable and allows Go Micro to be runtime agnostic. You can plugin any underlying technology.

Getting Started

To make use of Go Micro

import "go-micro.dev/v4"

// create a new service
service := micro.NewService(
    micro.Name("helloworld"),
)

// initialise flags
service.Init()

// start the service
service.Run()

See the examples for detailed information on usage.

Toolkit

See github.com/go-micro for tooling.

Changelog

See CHANGELOG.md for release history.

Download Details:

Author: Go-micro
Source Code: https://github.com/go-micro/go-micro 
License: Apache-2.0 license

#go #golang #microservices #rpc #micro 

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Go-micro: A Go Microservices Framework
Elian  Harber

Elian Harber

1664968920

Go-micro: A Go Microservices Framework

Go Micro

Go Micro is a framework for distributed systems development.

Overview

Go Micro provides the core requirements for distributed systems development including RPC and Event driven communication. The Go Micro philosophy is sane defaults with a pluggable architecture. We provide defaults to get you started quickly but everything can be easily swapped out.

Features

Go Micro abstracts away the details of distributed systems. Here are the main features.

Authentication - Auth is built in as a first class citizen. Authentication and authorization enable secure zero trust networking by providing every service an identity and certificates. This additionally includes rule based access control.

Dynamic Config - Load and hot reload dynamic config from anywhere. The config interface provides a way to load application level config from any source such as env vars, file, etcd. You can merge the sources and even define fallbacks.

Data Storage - A simple data store interface to read, write and delete records. It includes support for memory, file and CockroachDB by default. State and persistence becomes a core requirement beyond prototyping and Micro looks to build that into the framework.

Service Discovery - Automatic service registration and name resolution. Service discovery is at the core of micro service development. When service A needs to speak to service B it needs the location of that service. The default discovery mechanism is multicast DNS (mdns), a zeroconf system.

Load Balancing - Client side load balancing built on service discovery. Once we have the addresses of any number of instances of a service we now need a way to decide which node to route to. We use random hashed load balancing to provide even distribution across the services and retry a different node if there's a problem.

Message Encoding - Dynamic message encoding based on content-type. The client and server will use codecs along with content-type to seamlessly encode and decode Go types for you. Any variety of messages could be encoded and sent from different clients. The client and server handle this by default. This includes protobuf and json by default.

RPC Client/Server - RPC based request/response with support for bidirectional streaming. We provide an abstraction for synchronous communication. A request made to a service will be automatically resolved, load balanced, dialled and streamed.

Async Messaging - PubSub is built in as a first class citizen for asynchronous communication and event driven architectures. Event notifications are a core pattern in micro service development. The default messaging system is a HTTP event message broker.

Event Streaming - PubSub is great for async notifications but for more advanced use cases event streaming is preferred. Offering persistent storage, consuming from offsets and acking. Go Micro includes support for NATS Jetstream and Redis streams.

Synchronization - Distributed systems are often built in an eventually consistent manner. Support for distributed locking and leadership are built in as a Sync interface. When using an eventually consistent database or scheduling use the Sync interface.

Pluggable Interfaces - Go Micro makes use of Go interfaces for each distributed system abstraction. Because of this these interfaces are pluggable and allows Go Micro to be runtime agnostic. You can plugin any underlying technology.

Getting Started

To make use of Go Micro

import "go-micro.dev/v4"

// create a new service
service := micro.NewService(
    micro.Name("helloworld"),
)

// initialise flags
service.Init()

// start the service
service.Run()

See the examples for detailed information on usage.

Toolkit

See github.com/go-micro for tooling.

Changelog

See CHANGELOG.md for release history.

Download Details:

Author: Go-micro
Source Code: https://github.com/go-micro/go-micro 
License: Apache-2.0 license

#go #golang #microservices #rpc #micro 

Fannie  Zemlak

Fannie Zemlak

1599854400

What's new in the go 1.15

Go announced Go 1.15 version on 11 Aug 2020. Highlighted updates and features include Substantial improvements to the Go linker, Improved allocation for small objects at high core counts, X.509 CommonName deprecation, GOPROXY supports skipping proxies that return errors, New embedded tzdata package, Several Core Library improvements and more.

As Go promise for maintaining backward compatibility. After upgrading to the latest Go 1.15 version, almost all existing Golang applications or programs continue to compile and run as older Golang version.

#go #golang #go 1.15 #go features #go improvement #go package #go new features

Nigel  Uys

Nigel Uys

1654048740

Microservice: Library Provides A Simple Microservice Framework Based

Microservice  

The framework for the creation of microservices, written in Golang. This package is implemented using clean architecture principles. 

Endpoints

Code in /services/gateways/gatein/gatein.go

  • / welcome handler
  • /health_check for SRE
  • /readyness for kubernetes
  • /metrics prometheus metrics
  • /piblic/v1/bar/:key public route (example)

Using

Build and run main.go

Example requests:

  • localhost:8080/piblic/v1/bar/one
  • localhost:8080/piblic/v1/bar/123
  • localhost:8080/piblic/v1/bar/secret -> response 404
  • localhost:8080/piblic/v1/bar/looonnngggggkkkeeyyyyyyy

Clean architecture

Distribution of architectural entities by layers

Entity

Path /domain

Usecases

Path /usecases

Interfaces

Path /service

Infrastructure

Path /app , /config and core

Config

Types of variables that support the use of environment variables in the configuration (a pointer is required, or will be ignored!) :

  • string
  • float32, float64
  • int, int8, int16, int32, int64
  • uint, uint8, uint16, uint32, uint64

The default configuration file:

  • config/config.toml

Specify in the command line another file:

  • yourservice -config other.toml

Use environment variables in configuration:

  • yourservice -env true

Command line xample:

  • foo -config stage.toml -env true

Configuration with environment tag example:

type Config struct {
    MaxIDLenght *int `env:"FOO_MAX_ID_LENGHT"`
}

Dependencies

  • github.com/BurntSushi/toml
  • github.com/claygod/tools
  • github.com/google/uuid
  • github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter
  • github.com/pborman/getopt
  • github.com/prometheus/client_golang
  • github.com/prometheus/tsdb
  • github.com/sirupsen/logrus

ToDo

  •  Use environment variables in configuration
  •  Add support for metrics
  •  Use protocol gRPC

Conclusion

Microservice does not claim the laurels of the only true solution, but on occasion, I hope, will help you create your own micro-architecture of the service, becoming the prototype for future applications.

Give us a star!

If you like or are using this project to learn or start your solution, please give it a star. Thank you!

A good article on implementing these principles in Golang: http://manuel.kiessling.net/2012/09/28/applying-the-clean-architecture-to-go-applications/

Author: claygod
Source Code: https://github.com/claygod/microservice 
License: View license

#go #golang #microservice #framework 

Einar  Hintz

Einar Hintz

1599055326

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

#testing #software testing #test automation #microservice architecture #microservice #test #software test automation #microservice best practices #microservice deployment #microservice components

Mike  Kozey

Mike Kozey

1624510042

Choosing the Right Microservices Framework

Microservices architecture is a methodology that allows you to split a monolithic single application into small applications and services that perform lightweight tasks. Business capabilities and independently deployable models are the primary goals of microservices development. Microservices architecture is built using different programming languages, they can be deployed and interconnected.

Benefits of microservices

  • Implementation of new technologies and processes.
  • Scale applications independently.
  • Cloud ready.
  • Flawless integration.
  • Effective use of hardware.
  • Service-level security.
  • API-based functions for efficient reuse.
  • Independent application development and deployment.

Framework selection criteria

Below are some of the critical aspects to consider when choosing the right framework:

  1. Popularity - Measured by the industry acceptance of a framework, based on the number of customers who have made it (the framework) an enterprise standard. Other important aspects are the availability of documentation and the number of qualified professionals available on the market.

#microservices #framework #python #go #java