A Facial Recognition Giant Refuses to Share Details

The South Wales Police have been using live facial recognition since 2017 and claim to be the first department to make an arrest in the United Kingdom with the technology. Officers have surveillance cameras mounted on top of a large white van; the cameras record pedestrians and try to figure their identities.

While many facial recognition programs are hidden from the public eye or revealed only through public records requests, the U.K. has been touting its programs, publicizing the use of NEC’s technology by the South Wales Police and London’s Metropolitan Police.

Now, a lawsuit from U.K. human rights group Liberty is challenging the use of the software, claiming that it’s ineffective and racially biased.

How the U.K. determines facial recognition can be used within its borders could set a precedent for other European countries, just as the first cities in the United States to ban the technology have done.

Privacy advocates in the United States have been pushing a more radical solution: You don’t have to worry about biased data being used to train a facial recognition algorithm if you ban facial recognition entirely. As companies like AmazonMicrosoft, and IBM either pause or step away from police facial recognition contracts and municipalities like San Francisco and Boston ban the technology, the movement against facial recognition is undoubtedly growing in the United States.

A rebuke in the U.K. could bolster U.S. activists’ movements into one that’s worldwide, especially for NEC, which has more than 1,000 contracts around the globe.

NEC’s response to the lawsuit has lacked detail, to say the least, according to The Register.

The company has allegedly refused to provide any details of what data is used to train its algorithms to determine one face from another, and the police using the technology don’t know how the algorithm was trained. There’s reason for concern: A trial of NEC’s technology in 2018 had a 98% failure rate, and a 2019 audit found an 81% false positive rate.

Understanding the data used by the system is a crucial component of determining potential racial bias in the algorithm—information NEC seems to have no interest in divulging. In effect, the company is asking the public to take it at its word, and it’s unclear if that trust has been earned.


Now, for a change of pace.

In this week’s A.I. research, we’re going to focus on three papers that each deal with a different problem for self-driving cars. The entire autonomous vehicle industry is built on a single assumption: Driving on a public road is a task that a robot can accomplish.

Driving itself is actually fairly simple, and cars have been navigating their own journeys since 2004, when DARPA held its infamous competition. But driving alongside other vehicles in every weather condition on every kind of road, from highways to back roads, is another feat altogether.

Suddenly, driving isn’t just controlling a steering wheel but a mountain of subtasks, like identifying surrounding cars, seeing through rain, and dealing with hackers.

Here’s a look at some ideas for these problems:

Vehicle Re-ID for Surround-View Camera System

Self-driving cars typically have more than one camera to give them a 360-degree view. This research describes a way for a car to keep track of surrounding cars, as they’re seen by all of the car’s different cameras.

Object Detection Under Rainy Conditions for Autonomous Vehicles

Humans typically have no problem driving in the rain. But for algorithms, rain can completely alter a dataset. That could be raindrops on a camera lens or different contrasts between objects in cloud cover. The algorithm in this paper seeks to “de-rain” image data, making it usable to detect cars and signs around a car.

#machine-learning #general-intelligence #algorithms

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A Facial Recognition Giant Refuses to Share Details
clemency beula

clemency beula

1607409049

Fuse with the radical technology using the Face Recognition Employee Attendance Software

We are witnessing a lot of impacts in the world because of the COVID-19 pandemic. There is not much we could do to compensate for all the losses at once. But it can eventually be overcome. And the reason for this hope is ‘technology’.

Everything is just at an arm’s reach with the technology and it’s been proven time-to-time to us. One such thing that makes people still and stare for a moment is the Face Recognition Employee Attendance Software.

Face recognition is one of the most advanced technologies that is being implemented in the corporate industry now.

The software is mainly responsible for marking the attendance of the employees without them having to touch the screen.

Since ‘touch’ has become the most dangerous word in recent months, the system helps people to get away from it.

This software is also known as Contactless Attendance System that follows a highly hygiene scanning. Let’s look at the workflow:

  • The employee would stand in front of the device camera and the facial features get analysed. *
  • The features are then compared with the database containing the faces of all the employees. The user details are retrieved from the database.*
  • The user will be scanned to ensure that he/she has a mask and once they put the mask on, the system scans the face again.*
  • The social distancing guidelines are examined by scanning the area around the user. *
  • Once the criterias are matched, the attendance of the user is marked.

Working models of the software:
The software works in two different models such as:

Tab-based model:
The tablet having this software solution, will have to scan their faces at the entry points. They will wait for the system to confirm the checklist like detecting face masks and social distancing.

Mobile-based model:
The mobile-based model is safer, since it involves logging in with the WiFi server and login to the accounts. After matching the criteria, attendance would be marked.

On a concluding note, Employee contactless attendance software is the future. So, make the most out of it by contacting our team right now!

#face recognition attendance software #face recognition employee software #face recognition employee attendance software #face recognition based attendance software #contactless facial recognition attendance system

Kolby  Wyman

Kolby Wyman

1596722760

Can This AI Filter Protect Identities From Facial Recognition System?

Facial recognition technology has been a matter of grave concern since long, as much as to that, major tech giants like Microsoft, Amazon, IBM as well as Google have earlier this year, banned selling their FRT to police authorities. Additionally, Clearview AI’s groundbreaking facial recognition app that scrapped billions of images of people without consent made the matter even worse for the public.

In fact, the whole concept of companies using social media images of people without their permission to train their FRT algorithms can turn out to be troublesome for the general public’s identity and personal privacy. And thus, to protect human identities from companies who can misuse them, researchers from the computer science department of the University of Chicago, proposed an AI system to fool these facial recognition systems.

Termed as Fawkes — named after the British soldier Guy Fawkes Night, this AI system has been designed to help users to safeguard their images and selfies with a filter from against these unfavored facial recognition models. This filter, as the researchers called it “cloak,” adds an invisible pixel-level change on the photos that cannot be seen with human eyes, but can deceive these FRTs.

#opinions #ai filter #facial recognition #facial recognition india

How much does it cost to build a video sharing app?

There are so many things you can do with your mobile phone, regardless of which operating system you use. Your smartphone is a miniature computer, which means you can use it to browse the web, stream music and download apps galore. You can also share videos with certain apps. There is no doubt that video, editing, recording, and sharing application development will give a wholesome solution to your app users and will help you make your application stand out from the competitors.

Are you searching for the app development company who build video sharing app? If yes then AppClues Infotech is the best mobile app development company offer world-class mobile app development services at competitive prices across all major mobile platforms for start-ups as well as enterprises. Our team of professional designers and developers can proficiently develop a video sharing mobile app tailored to your needs, to help you achieve the end result of your business gaining more market autonomy.

Our Expertise in Mobile App Development:

  • iPhone App Development
  • iPad App Development
  • Apple Watch App Development
  • Flutter App Development
  • Android App Development
  • Ionic App Development
  • React Native App Development
  • Windows App Development
  • Cross-Platform App Development

We offer custom social networking app development solutions which are designed to not just make your brand a household name but also to keep your brand above the ever-growing crowd of entertainment mobile apps. We build mobile apps across various industry verticals including travel, social networking, restaurant, real estate, health care, news, etc.

The expense of video sharing app development depends on app size, app platform, app functionality, what features you require, the team of app developers, etc. So generally cost is in between $2,000 - 15,000. It can vary from app to app because every app has different requirements.

#video sharing app development #best video sharing app development company #top video sharing app development company #make a video sharing mobile app #cost to create a video sharing app

A Facial Recognition Giant Refuses to Share Details

The South Wales Police have been using live facial recognition since 2017 and claim to be the first department to make an arrest in the United Kingdom with the technology. Officers have surveillance cameras mounted on top of a large white van; the cameras record pedestrians and try to figure their identities.

While many facial recognition programs are hidden from the public eye or revealed only through public records requests, the U.K. has been touting its programs, publicizing the use of NEC’s technology by the South Wales Police and London’s Metropolitan Police.

Now, a lawsuit from U.K. human rights group Liberty is challenging the use of the software, claiming that it’s ineffective and racially biased.

How the U.K. determines facial recognition can be used within its borders could set a precedent for other European countries, just as the first cities in the United States to ban the technology have done.

Privacy advocates in the United States have been pushing a more radical solution: You don’t have to worry about biased data being used to train a facial recognition algorithm if you ban facial recognition entirely. As companies like AmazonMicrosoft, and IBM either pause or step away from police facial recognition contracts and municipalities like San Francisco and Boston ban the technology, the movement against facial recognition is undoubtedly growing in the United States.

A rebuke in the U.K. could bolster U.S. activists’ movements into one that’s worldwide, especially for NEC, which has more than 1,000 contracts around the globe.

NEC’s response to the lawsuit has lacked detail, to say the least, according to The Register.

The company has allegedly refused to provide any details of what data is used to train its algorithms to determine one face from another, and the police using the technology don’t know how the algorithm was trained. There’s reason for concern: A trial of NEC’s technology in 2018 had a 98% failure rate, and a 2019 audit found an 81% false positive rate.

Understanding the data used by the system is a crucial component of determining potential racial bias in the algorithm—information NEC seems to have no interest in divulging. In effect, the company is asking the public to take it at its word, and it’s unclear if that trust has been earned.


Now, for a change of pace.

In this week’s A.I. research, we’re going to focus on three papers that each deal with a different problem for self-driving cars. The entire autonomous vehicle industry is built on a single assumption: Driving on a public road is a task that a robot can accomplish.

Driving itself is actually fairly simple, and cars have been navigating their own journeys since 2004, when DARPA held its infamous competition. But driving alongside other vehicles in every weather condition on every kind of road, from highways to back roads, is another feat altogether.

Suddenly, driving isn’t just controlling a steering wheel but a mountain of subtasks, like identifying surrounding cars, seeing through rain, and dealing with hackers.

Here’s a look at some ideas for these problems:

Vehicle Re-ID for Surround-View Camera System

Self-driving cars typically have more than one camera to give them a 360-degree view. This research describes a way for a car to keep track of surrounding cars, as they’re seen by all of the car’s different cameras.

Object Detection Under Rainy Conditions for Autonomous Vehicles

Humans typically have no problem driving in the rain. But for algorithms, rain can completely alter a dataset. That could be raindrops on a camera lens or different contrasts between objects in cloud cover. The algorithm in this paper seeks to “de-rain” image data, making it usable to detect cars and signs around a car.

#machine-learning #general-intelligence #algorithms

Teresa  Jerde

Teresa Jerde

1597481640

How IBM's Stance on Face Recognition Will Affect the AI Industry

In a letter to congress sent on June 8th, IBM’s CEO Arvind Krishna made a bold statement regarding the company’s policy toward facial recognition. “IBM no longer offers general purpose IBM facial recognition or analysis software,” says Krishna.
“IBM firmly opposes and will not condone uses of any technology, including facial recognition technology offered by other vendors, for mass surveillance, racial profiling, violations of basic human rights and freedoms, or any purpose which is not consistent with our values and Principles of Trust and Transparency.” The company has halted all facial recognition development and disapproves of any technology that could lead to racial profiling.

#facial-recognition #facial-recognition-tech #ibm #artificial-intelligence #machine-learning #computer-vision #data-science #hackernoon-top-story