Camron  Shields

Camron Shields

1595303958

Explaining Microservices and Service Mesh with Istio

Application builds when broken down into multiple smaller service components, are known as microservices. When compared to the traditional Monolithic way, a Microservice Architecture treats each microservice as a standalone entity/module, essentially helping to ease the maintenance of its code and related infrastructure. Each microservice of an application can be written in a different technology stack, and further be deployed, optimized and managed independently.

Though in theory, a Microservice Architecture specifically benefits build of complex large-scale applications, however, it is also widely used for small-scale application builds (for example, a simple shopping cart) - with an eye to scale further.

Benefits of a Microservice Architecture

  • Individual microservices within an application can be developed and deployed through different technology stacks.
  • Each microservice can be optimized, deployed or scaled independently.
  • Better fault handling and error detection.

Benefits of a Microservice Architecture

  • Individual microservices within an application can be developed and deployed through different technology stacks.
  • Each microservice can be optimized, deployed or scaled independently.
  • Better fault handling and error detection.

Components of a Microservice Architecture

A modern cloud-native application running on Microservice Architecture relies on the following critical components:

  • Containerization (through platforms like Docker) - for effective management and deployment of services by breaking them into multiple processes.
  • Orchestration (through platforms like Kubernetes) - for configuration, assignment and management of available system resources to services.
  • Service Mesh (through platforms like Istio) - for inter-service communication through a mesh of service- proxies to connect, manage and secure microservices.

The above three are the most important components of a microservice architecture that allow applications in a cloud-native stack to scale under load and perform even during partial failures of the cloud environment.

#serverless #microservice architecture #cloud native #istio #service mesh

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Explaining Microservices and Service Mesh with Istio

The Service Mesh in the Microservices World - DZone Microservices

The software industry has come a long journey and throughout this journey, Software Architecture has evolved a lot. Starting with 1-tier (Single-node), 2-tier (Client/ Server), 3-tier, and Distributed are some of the Software Architectural patterns we saw in this journey.

The Problem

The majority of software companies are moving from Monolithic architecture to Microservices architecture, and Microservices architecture is taking over the software industry day-by-day. While monolithic architecture has many benefits, it also has so many shortcomings when catering to modern software development needs. With those shortcomings of monolithic architecture, it is very difficult to meet the demand of the modern-world software requirements and as a result, microservices architecture is taking control of the software development aggressively. The Microservices architecture enables us to deploy our applications more frequently, independently, and reliably meeting modern-day software application development requirements.

#microservice architecture #istio #microservice best practices #linkerd #microservice communication #microservice design #envoy proxy #kubernetes architecture #api gateways #service mesh architecture

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1598169240

From Service Mess to Service Mesh

Introduction

Over the last 10 years, the rapid adoption of microservices architecture has resulted in enterprises with hundreds or (sometimes even thousands) of services. With the growth of containerization technologies like Docker and Kubernetes, microservice patterns have seen the strongest growth; resulting in a complex dependency matrix between these micro-services. For teams to monitor, support, and to maintain these services is becoming a challenge so most enterprises have invested in some kind of microservices management tool.

This article will explore some of the common aspects of microservice management. Then we’ll take a closer look at the centralized gateway pattern, as well as its limitations (most enterprises have started with or currently still use this pattern). Then we will look into a new pattern called “Service Mesh” which has gained a lot of attention in the last 3–4 years. Often this pattern is also referred to as the “Side Car Proxy”. So lets get started!

Micro-Services Management

As enterprises start building more and more microservices, it’s becoming clear that some of the aspects of microservices are common across all microservices. So it makes sense to provide a common platform for managing these common aspects. Below are some of the key common aspects:

Service Registration and Discovery: A commonplace to register, document, search and discover microservices

Service Version Management: Ability to run multiple versions of a microservice.

**Authentication and Authorization: **Handle authentication and authorization including Mutual TLS (MTLS) between services.

Service Observability: Ability to monitor end to end traffic between services, response times, and quickly identify failures and bottlenecks.

**Rate Limiting: **Define threshold limits that traffic services can handle.

Circuit Breaker: Ability to configure and introduce a circuit breaker in case of failure scenarios (to avoid flooding downstream services with requests).

**Retry Logic: **Ability to configure and introduce retry logic dynamically in services.

So it’s a good idea to build these concerns as part of a common framework or service management tool. As a result, micro-service development teams don’t have to build these aspects in the service itself.

#service-mesh #istio-service-mesh #microservices #gateway-service #envoy-proxy

Deploy a Microservice into Istio service mesh

Before going to deploy the service into istio let’s first understand what is service mesh.

The service mesh is a dedicated infrastructure layer for handling service to service communication.

Basically, it’s a way to control how different micro services deployed on Kubernetes will manage secure communication and traffic between them with lots of cross-cutting concerns like logging, security, etc.

Istio service mesh comes with lot’s of feature like –

  • circuit-breaking
  • load balancing
  • service discovery
  • number of retries

we will not talk about the feature here, Let’s jump over to how we can deploy here so we categories the deployment process in 3 phases.

  • Download and install Istio on cluster
  • Deploy the micro-service
  • Setup the Gateway

Download and install Istio on cluster

For downloading the latest version we can refer to the release page. Just download the tar.gz file and unzip it. In the directory, we will find istioctl client which we can use

  • To customise the configuration of service mesh istio
  • Retrieve the information about proxy configuration …

Now set the istioctl client to your machine path and for installation we need to choose the configuration profile. There are a set of configuration profiles, we are going to use a demo profile which enables the components according to default settings.

use the following command for installing the demo configuration profile.

istioctl install --set profile=demo

As we know, istio automatically injects Envoy sidecar proxies using mutating webhook admission controllers when we deploy services in a particular namespace. To enable this feature we need to enable the istio-injection in a particular namespace where we will deploy the application.

kubectl label namespace default istio-injection=enabled

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image.png

Deploy the micro-service

Now let’s deploy the sample application by applying the following yaml file.

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: sample
  namespace: default
  labels:
    app: sample
spec:
  selector:
    app: sample
  ports:
    - name: http
      port: 8081
---
apiVersion: apps/v1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
  name: sample
  namespace: default
spec:
  replicas: 1
  selector:
    matchLabels:
      app: sample
      version: 'v1'
  template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        app: sample
        version: 'v1'
    spec:
      initContainers:
        - name: init-ds
          image: busybox:latest
          command:
            - '/bin/sh'
            - '-c'
            - |
              while true
              do
                if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
                  echo "DB is UP"
                  break
                fi
                echo "DB is not yet reachable;sleep for 10s before retry"
                sleep 10
              done
      containers:
        - name: sample-app
          image: lokesh/bundle123:latest
          imagePullPolicy: Always
          env:
            - name: SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE
              value: prod
            - name: SPRING_SLEUTH_PROPAGATION_KEYS
              value: 'x-request-id,x-ot-span-context'
            - name: JAVA_OPTS
              value: ' -Xmx256m -Xms256m'
          resources:
            requests:
              memory: '256Mi'
              cpu: '50m'
            limits:
              memory: '512Mi'
              cpu: '1'
          ports:
            - name: http
              containerPort: 8081
---
apiVersion: networking.istio.io/v1alpha3
kind: VirtualService
metadata:
  name: sample
spec:
  hosts:
    - "*"
  gateways:
    - sample-gateway
  http:
    - match:
        - uri:
            exact: /getStudents
        - uri:
            exact: /accounts/create
        - uri:
            exact: /istio/auth
        - uri:
            prefix: /getTeacher
      route:
        - destination:
            host: sample
            port:
              number: 8081

#devops #microservices #scala #tech blogs #deploy microservice #istio #service mesh

Camron  Shields

Camron Shields

1595303958

Explaining Microservices and Service Mesh with Istio

Application builds when broken down into multiple smaller service components, are known as microservices. When compared to the traditional Monolithic way, a Microservice Architecture treats each microservice as a standalone entity/module, essentially helping to ease the maintenance of its code and related infrastructure. Each microservice of an application can be written in a different technology stack, and further be deployed, optimized and managed independently.

Though in theory, a Microservice Architecture specifically benefits build of complex large-scale applications, however, it is also widely used for small-scale application builds (for example, a simple shopping cart) - with an eye to scale further.

Benefits of a Microservice Architecture

  • Individual microservices within an application can be developed and deployed through different technology stacks.
  • Each microservice can be optimized, deployed or scaled independently.
  • Better fault handling and error detection.

Benefits of a Microservice Architecture

  • Individual microservices within an application can be developed and deployed through different technology stacks.
  • Each microservice can be optimized, deployed or scaled independently.
  • Better fault handling and error detection.

Components of a Microservice Architecture

A modern cloud-native application running on Microservice Architecture relies on the following critical components:

  • Containerization (through platforms like Docker) - for effective management and deployment of services by breaking them into multiple processes.
  • Orchestration (through platforms like Kubernetes) - for configuration, assignment and management of available system resources to services.
  • Service Mesh (through platforms like Istio) - for inter-service communication through a mesh of service- proxies to connect, manage and secure microservices.

The above three are the most important components of a microservice architecture that allow applications in a cloud-native stack to scale under load and perform even during partial failures of the cloud environment.

#serverless #microservice architecture #cloud native #istio #service mesh

Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1595350140

Explaining Microservices and Service Mesh with Istio

Application builds when broken down into multiple smaller service components, are known as microservices. When compared to the traditional Monolithic way, a Microservice Architecture treats each microservice as a standalone entity/module, essentially helping to ease the maintenance of its code and related infrastructure. Each microservice of an application can be written in a different technology stack, and further be deployed, optimized and managed independently.

Though in theory, a Microservice Architecture specifically benefits build of complex large-scale applications, however, it is also widely used for small-scale application builds (for example, a simple shopping cart) - with an eye to scale further.

Benefits of a Microservice Architecture

  • Individual microservices within an application can be developed and deployed through different technology stacks.
  • Each microservice can be optimized, deployed or scaled independently.
  • Better fault handling and error detection.

Benefits of a Microservice Architecture

  • Individual microservices within an application can be developed and deployed through different technology stacks.
  • Each microservice can be optimized, deployed or scaled independently.
  • Better fault handling and error detection.

Components of a Microservice Architecture

A modern cloud-native application running on Microservice Architecture relies on the following critical components:

  • Containerization (through platforms like Docker) - for effective management and deployment of services by breaking them into multiple processes.
  • Orchestration (through platforms like Kubernetes) - for configuration, assignment and management of available system resources to services.
  • Service Mesh (through platforms like Istio) - for inter-service communication through a mesh of service- proxies to connect, manage and secure microservices.

The above three are the most important components of a microservice architecture that allow applications in a cloud-native stack to scale under load and perform even during partial failures of the cloud environment.

Complexities of a Microservice Architecture

A large application when broken down to multiple microservices, each using a different technology stack (language, DB, etc.), requiring multiple environments to form a complex architecture to manage. Though Docker containerization helps to manage and deploy individual microservices by breaking each into multiple processes running in separate Docker Containers, the inter-services communication remains critically complicated as you have to deal with the overall system health, fault tolerance and multiple points of failure.

Let us understand this by how a shopping cart works on a Microservice Architecture. Microservices here would relate to the inventory database, the payment gateway service, the product suggestion algorithm based on the customer’s access history, etc. While all these services remain a stand-alone mini-module theoritically, they do need to interact among each other. It is important to note that a service-to-service communication is what makes microservices possible.

Why Do We Need a Service Mesh?

Now that you know the importance of a service-to-service communication in a microservice architecture, it seems apparent that the communication channel remains fault-free, secured, highly-available and robust. This is where a service mesh comes in as an infrastructure component, which ensures a controlled service-to-service communication by implementing multiple service proxies. A Service Mesh is responsible for fine-tuning communication among different services rather than adding new functionalities.

In a Service Mesh, proxies deployed alongside individual services enabling inter-service communication is widely known as the Sidecar Pattern. The sidecars (proxies) might be designed to handle any functionalities critical to inter-service communication like load balancing, circuit breaking, service discovery, etc.

Through a Service Mesh, you can:

  • Maintain, configure and secure all service-to-service communications among all or selected microservices of an application.
  • Configure and perform network functions within microservices such as network resiliency, load balancing, circuit breaking, service discovery, etc.
  • Network functions are maintained and implemented as a separate entity from the business logic, fulfilling the need of a dedicated layer for service-to-service communication decoupling from application code.
  • As a result, developers can focus on the application’s business logic, while all or most of the work related to network communication is handled by the service mesh.
  • Since a microservice to service mesh proxy communication is always on top of standard protocols such as HTTP1.x/2.x, gRPC, etc., developers can use any technology to develop individual services.

#serverless #microservice architecture #cloud native #istio #service mesh