Joshua Carter

Joshua Carter

1581160140

Simple and slim React bindings for those Bootstrap components

Simple and slim React bindings for those Bootstrap components which modify the DOM. Includes Modal, ButtonDropdown, and NavBar.

These React components implement the Bootstrap widgets which require more than just css classes, namely Modal, ButtonDropdown, NavBar and Tabs.

Installing

import with webpack via

import {
  Modal,
  NavBar,
  ButtonDropdown,
  Tabs,
  Tab
} from 'simple-react-bootstrap'

As of version 0.3, this library ships standard ES6, which should run in all modern browsers. If you need to support older browsers, then just add the following alias to your webpack configuration

  resolve: {
    extensions: [".ts", ".tsx", ".js"],
    alias: {
      "simple-react-bootstrap": "node_modules/simple-react-bootstrap/lib-es5/library.js"
    },
    modules: [path.resolve("./"), path.resolve("./node_modules")]
  }

this will pull in transpiled, (and slightly larger) ES5, which should run fine in IE.

Documentation

Tabs

Usage

<Tabs>
  <Tab caption="A">This is content a</Tab>
  <Tab caption="B">This is content b</Tab>
  <Tab caption="C">This is content c</Tab>
</Tabs>

This renders uncontrolled tabs with the first tab selected by default. To select a different tab by default, pass defaultTab, with
the zero-based index (either string or number will work fine) of the relevant tab.

<Tabs defaultTab="1">
  <Tab caption="A">This is content a</Tab>
  <Tab caption="B">Selected by default</Tab>
  <Tab caption="C">This is content c</Tab>
</Tabs>

or you can give your tabs custom names

<Tabs defaultTab="b">
  <Tab name="a" caption="A">
    This is content a
  </Tab>
  <Tab name="b" caption="B">
    This is content b
  </Tab>
  <Tab name="c" caption="C">
    This is content c
  </Tab>
</Tabs>

Controlled

Exactly the same as above, except pass in a tab property representing the current tab, and an onChangeTab method which will be invoked when
a tab is selected, and passed the clicked tab’s name. By default that will be the zero-based index, unless you override it with your own name, as shown above.

<Tabs tab={this.state.controlledB} onChangeTab={this.setB}>
  <Tab caption="A">This is content a</Tab>
  <Tab caption="B">This is content b</Tab>
  <Tab caption="C">This is content c</Tab>
</Tabs>

Additional options

Any other props you pass to <Tab /> will be passed along to the corresponding tab header’s <li>.

<Tabs>
  <Tab caption="A" className="red" style={{ backgroundColor: "red" }}>
    This is content a
  </Tab>
  <Tab caption="B" className="blue" style={{ backgroundColor: "blue" }}>
    This is content b
  </Tab>
  <Tab caption="C">This is content c</Tab>
</Tabs>

If you’d like to pass props down to the corresponding tab-pane div, you can pass them all in a single paneProps prop

<Tabs>
  <Tab caption="A" paneProps={{ className: "red", style: { backgroundColor: "red" } }}>
    This is content a
  </Tab>
  <Tab caption="B" paneProps={{ className: "blue", style: { backgroundColor: "blue" } }}>
    This is content b
  </Tab>
  <Tab caption="C">This is content c</Tab>
</Tabs>

Coming soon: tabs with dropdown headers, as shown here: http://getbootstrap.com/javascript/#tabs

Modal

NOTE As of version 0.4, the Modal component uses css transitions to handle the animation. This greatly simplifies and reduces the library code, but does mean that you now need to load the stylesheet simple-react-bootstrap-styles.css into your application. This file is located at the root of this project, and loading it can be as simple as

<link rel="stylesheet" href="node_modules/simple-react-bootstrap/simple-react-bootstrap-styles.css">

or of course you can use your favorite webpack loader. There’s currently no way to turn animations off, but that may be added in a future release.

Special thanks to Brian Curley for help with the css transitions.

Usage

<Modal className="fade" show={this.state.basicModal} onHide={() => this.setState({ basicModal: false })}>
  <Modal.Header>
    <h3>Hello World</h3>
  </Modal.Header>
  <Modal.Body>
    <p>Modal body</p>
  </Modal.Body>
  <Modal.Footer>
    <button type="button" className="btn btn-default" onClick={() => this.setState({ basicModal: false })}>
      Close
    </button>
    <button type="button" className="btn btn-primary">
      Save changes
    </button>
  </Modal.Footer>
</Modal>

The css class fade adds animation, as with Bootstrap normally.

Everything else should work as expected. All props passed down to any of these sections should pass through properly.


NavBar

The NavBar component is mostly a set of helpers for generating the html Bootstrap expects. The real value this component adds is in the NavBar.Dropdown, and the NavBar.Toggle components; the latter adds the normal Bootstrap behavior which hides the NavBar’s contents on small screens, and renders instead a “hamburger menu” button to slides toggle the contents down / up.

Usage

<NavBar>
  <NavBar.Header>
    <NavBar.Brand>
      <a style={{ cursor: "pointer" }}>Header</a>
    </NavBar.Brand>
    <NavBar.Toggle />
  </NavBar.Header>
  <NavBar.Nav>
    <NavBar.Item className="class-on-item">Link 1</NavBar.Item>
    <NavBar.Item disabled={true}>Link 2</NavBar.Item>
    <NavBar.Item active={true} href="http://www.google.com">
      Link 3
    </NavBar.Item>
    <NavBar.Dropdown toggleClassName="pointer-cursor" style={{ color: "red" }} text="Sub menu">
      <NavBar.Item>Sub option a</NavBar.Item>
      <NavBar.Item href="#foo">Sub option b</NavBar.Item>
      <NavBar.ItemDivider />
      <NavBar.Item>Sub option c</NavBar.Item>
    </NavBar.Dropdown>
    <NavBar.Dropdown disabled={true} text="Sub menu">
      <NavBar.Item>Sub option a</NavBar.Item>
      <NavBar.Item>Sub option b</NavBar.Item>
      <NavBar.Item>Sub option c</NavBar.Item>
    </NavBar.Dropdown>
  </NavBar.Nav>
  <NavBar.Header>
    <NavBar.Brand>
      <a style={{ cursor: "pointer" }}>Second Header</a>
    </NavBar.Brand>
    <NavBar.Toggle />
  </NavBar.Header>
  <NavBar.Form className="pull-left">
    <div className="form-group">
      <div className="input-group">
        <span className="input-group-btn">
          <button className="btn default">Search</button>
        </span>
        <input className="form-control" placeholder="Quick title search" />
      </div>
    </div>
  </NavBar.Form>
</NavBar>

The NavBar.Dropdown component is implemented internally with the ButtonDropdown component (documented below). ignoreContentClick will be passed through as needed; also, manually controlling the dropdown’s “open” state is just a matter of rendering the ButtonDropdown yourself, in controlled mode. For example

<div>
  <NavBar>
    <NavBar.Header>
      <NavBar.Brand>
        <a style={{ cursor: "pointer" }}>Header</a>
      </NavBar.Brand>
      <NavBar.Toggle />
    </NavBar.Header>
    <NavBar.Nav>
      <NavBar.Item className="class-on-item">Link 1</NavBar.Item>
      <NavBar.Item disabled={true}>Link 2</NavBar.Item>
      <NavBar.Item active={true} href="http://www.google.com">
        Link 3
      </NavBar.Item>

      <ButtonDropdown containerElementType="li" open={this.state.manualOpen} clean={true}>
        <a className="dropdown-toggle pointer-cursor" style={{ color: "red" }}>
          Sub menu <span className="caret" />
        </a>
        <ul className="dropdown-menu">
          <NavBar.Item>Sub option a</NavBar.Item>
          <NavBar.Item href="#foo">Sub option b</NavBar.Item>
          <NavBar.ItemDivider />
          <NavBar.Item>Sub option c</NavBar.Item>
        </ul>
      </ButtonDropdown>

      <NavBar.Dropdown disabled={true} text="Sub menu">
        <NavBar.Item>Sub option a</NavBar.Item>
        <NavBar.Item>Sub option b</NavBar.Item>
        <NavBar.Item>Sub option c</NavBar.Item>
      </NavBar.Dropdown>
    </NavBar.Nav>
    <NavBar.Header>
      <NavBar.Brand>
        <a style={{ cursor: "pointer" }}>Second Header</a>
      </NavBar.Brand>
      <NavBar.Toggle />
    </NavBar.Header>
    <NavBar.Form className="pull-left">
      <div className="form-group">
        <div className="input-group">
          <span className="input-group-btn">
            <button className="btn default">Search</button>
          </span>
          <input className="form-control" placeholder="Quick title search" />
        </div>
      </div>
    </NavBar.Form>
  </NavBar>
  <button onClick={() => this.setState({ manualOpen: true })}>Down</button>
  <button onClick={() => this.setState({ manualOpen: false })}>Up</button>
</div>


ButtonDropdown

Basic dropdown-button

<ButtonDropdown>
  <button className="btn btn-default">Out of the box</button>
  <div>
    <h1>Hello</h1>
  </div>
</ButtonDropdown>

which will render

<div class="btn-group">
  <button class="dropdown-toggle btn btn-default">Out of the box</button>
  <div class="dropdown-menu">
    <h1>Hello</h1>
  </div>
</div>

The most simple use case passes two children to ButtonDropdown: the first will be rendered as given, but with a dropdown-toggle class added; the second will be rendered as given, but with a dropdown-menu class added. By default, both will be rendered in a div with the btn-group class added. When the dropdown-toggle element is clicked, the parent will have an open class added, which causes the dropdown content to show, per Bootstrap’s css rules. Any click anywhere causes it to hide again.

Fully customizable

Any properties you add to the root container, including styles, will be passed through; any css classes will be merged in with btn-group. Any click event added to the toggle button will be invoked prior to the default behavior of toggling the button (if you want to take over this toggling yourself, see below).

Fully fully customizable

If you need a more robust dropdown button than can be represented with a toggleButton and a dropdown div, then pass whatever arbitrary children you want; just be sure to manually add the dropdown-toggle and dropdown-menu classes where needed, so the component will know what’s what.

<ButtonDropdown>
    <i className="fa fa-tag"></i>
    <span>Arbitrary children + with null</span>
    <span>Hello</span>
    {null}
    <a className="dropdown-toggle"><i className="fa fa-fw fa-caret-down"></i></a>
    <span><---- toggle is right there</span>
    <div className="dropdown-menu">
        <div>
            <span>
                <h1>Hello</h1>
            </span>
        </div>
        <h1>World</h1>
    </div>
</ButtonDropdown>

Using a custom component for the toggle button

One caveat to the above, is that if you want to use a custom component for the toggle, such as

<ButtonDropdown>
  <HashBtn className={`btn btn-default`} toMerge={{ isSupportTicket: 1 }}>
    Tickets <span className="caret" />
  </HashBtn>
  <ul>
    <li className="dropdown-header">Close Requests</li>
    <li className={searchVm.closeRequests == "" ? "active" : ""}>
      <HashA toMerge={{ closeRequests: null }}>Any</HashA>
    </li>
    <li className={searchVm.closeRequests == "0" ? "active" : ""}>
      <HashA toMerge={{ closeRequests: 0 }}>None</HashA>
    </li>
    <li className={searchVm.closeRequests == "1" ? "active" : ""}>
      <HashA toMerge={{ closeRequests: 1 }}>One</HashA>
    </li>
    <li className={searchVm.closeRequests == "2" ? "active" : ""}>
      <HashA toMerge={{ closeRequests: 2 }}>Two</HashA>
    </li>
    <li className={searchVm.closeRequests == "3" ? "active" : ""}>
      <HashA toMerge={{ closeRequests: "Over2" }}>More Than 2</HashA>
    </li>
  </ul>
</ButtonDropdown>

Then two conditions must be satisfied:

  1. The component cannot be a stateless functional component; in other words you need to define it with class extends React.Component. The reason boils down to refs, and ReactDom.findDOMNode not working with SFCs.
  2. The component must pass through (or merge in) the onClick handler that’s passed to it.

Using a custom component for the dropdown content

To use a custom component for the dropdown content, two conditions must be satisfied

  1. The component cannot be a stateless functional component; in other words you need to define it with class extends React.Component. The reason boils down to refs, and ReactDom.findDOMNode not working with SFCs.
  2. The component must pass through (or merge in) the classNames property, so the right css class makes it in.

Misc options

clean

Causes the btn-group class to not be added to the root container

disabled

Disables the button, and prevents any toggling from happening

containerElementType

Pass an element type to render for the root container, instead of a div. For example, pass the string span to render a span, etc.

deferDropdownRendering

Pass true to defer rendering of the dropdown menu until it’s actually open. Use this if you’re rendering a lot of ButtonDropdowns, which all have some sort of expensive component in the dropdown.

ignoreContentClick

By default any clicks in the dropdown menu will close the menu. This is usually desired, for example, a dropdown showing links should close after one of them is clicked. If you choose to use the dropdown for something else, and want clicks in the dropdown to not cause the dropdown to close, pass true for this option.

Controlled mode

If you’d like to manually control the dropdown state, you can pass a value for open to the root container. You can then provide an onToggle callback that’ll be called in all the places where the open/closed toggling would normally be done, when in un-controlled mode (ie, no open passed in).

All the normal options are still respected. For example, this would essentially re-create the default dropdown behavior, while ignoring any clicks in the dropdown menu.

<ButtonDropdown
  ignoreContentClick={true}
  onToggle={() => this.setState({ controlled1Open: !this.state.controlled1Open })}
  open={this.state.controlled1Open}
>
  <button className="btn btn-default">Ignore content click still respected</button>
  <div>
    <button className="btn btn-primary">Nothing</button>
    <button onClick={() => this.setState({ controlled1Open: false })} className="btn btn-danger">
      Close
    </button>
  </div>
</ButtonDropdown>

A more flexible (if contrived) example follows. This causes the dropdown to only open if the toggle button is clicked, and once open, will only close if the close button in the dropdown menu is clicked.

<ButtonDropdown open={this.state.controlled3Open}>
  <button onClick={() => this.setState({ controlled3Open: true })} className="btn btn-default">
    Toggle button to open, red button to close. ONLY
  </button>
  <div>
    <button className="btn btn-primary">Nothing</button>
    <button onClick={() => this.setState({ controlled3Open: false })} className="btn btn-danger">
      Close
    </button>
  </div>
</ButtonDropdown>

GitHub

Author: arackaf

GitHub: https://github.com/arackaf/simple-react-bootstrap

#reactjs #javascript

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Buddha Community

Simple and slim React bindings for those Bootstrap components
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Jack  Shaw

Jack Shaw

1652252400

React Bootstrap: Bootstrap Components Built with React

React-Bootstrap

Bootstrap 5 components built with React.  

Bootstrap compatibility

React-Bootstrap is compatible with various versions of Bootstrap. As such, you need to ensure you are using the correct combination of versions.

See the below table on which version of React-Bootstrap you should be using in your project.

Bootstrap VersionReact-Bootstrap VersionDocumentation
v5.x2.x[Link][v5-documentation]
v4.x1.x[Link][v4-documentation]
v3.x0.33.x (not maintained)[Link][v3-documentation]

Migrating from previous versions

Bootstrap 4 to Bootstrap 5

If you would like to update React-Bootstrap within an existing project to use Bootstrap 5, please read our docs for migrating to React-Bootstrap V2.

Bootstrap 3 to Bootstrap 4

If you would like to update React-Bootstrap within an existing project to use Bootstrap 4, please read our docs for migrating to React-Bootstrap V1.

Related modules

Local setup

Yarn is our package manager of choice here. Check out setup instructions here if you don't have it installed already. After that you can run yarn run bootstrap to install all the needed dependencies.

From there you can:

  • Run the tests once with yarn test (Or run them in watch mode with yarn run tdd).
  • Start a local copy of the docs site with yarn start
  • Or build a local copy of the library with yarn run build

CodeSandbox Examples

Click here to explore some React-Bootstrap CodeSandbox examples.

Click here to automatically open CodeSandbox with the React-Bootstrap CodeSandbox Examples GitHub Repository as a workspace.

Contributions

Yes please! See the contributing guidelines for details.


Author: react-bootstrap
Source Code: https://github.com/react-bootstrap/react-bootstrap
License: MIT license

#bootstrap #react #react-native 

mehul bagada

mehul bagada

1590992910

React Bootstrap Select Dropdown Example

Hello Guys,

This simple article demonstrates of react select dropdown example. This article goes in detailed on react select dropdown onchange. In this article, we will implement a react bootstrap select dropdown example. this example will help you react select custom dropdown.

If you are new in react js then we are provide react select box example. in this example we are save dropdown value in state. select box onchange event save data in state.

Link :- https://www.nicesnippets.com/blog/react-bootstrap-select-dropdown-example

#react #bootstrap #react-bootstrap #dropdown #react-native #reacttutorial

Lilyan  Streich

Lilyan Streich

1598529840

React Bootstrap Table2 Example

React Bootstrap Table2 Example is the today’s leading topic. In this example, I will show you how you can install react-bootstrap-table2  and display the backend data to the frontend  using this library. There are so many options that we can apply to our **react-bootstrap-table2. **

React Bootstrap Table2 Example

We start this tutorial by installing the  react.js.

#react #bootstrap #react bootstrap table2 #react.js

Aubrey  Price

Aubrey Price

1589722410

Build a simple React Native Pokemon app with React-Navigation

As we start learning new technologies we want to start building something or work on a simple project to get a better understanding of the technology. So, let’s build this simple app.
For this app, we will be using PokeApi to get our pokemon data, and also we will be using Hooks. I am using pokemondb for pokemon sprites. It’s just a personal preference you can use whatever you want.

#react-native #react-native-app #react-navigation #react-native-development #react