Sigrid  Farrell

Sigrid Farrell

1624096699

Java News Roundup - Week of June 7th, 2021

This week’s roundup features news from OpenJDK and JDK 17 moving to Rampdown Phase One, JDK 18, a new Helidon extension for Visual Studio Code, JFR support in GraalVM native images, Quarkus 1.13 maintenance release, WildFly 24 Beta1, and updates to Spring Framework and Spring Boot.

OpenJDK and JDK 17

In the JDK 17 early access builds, Build 26 features numerous changes from Build 25 that include fixes to various issues.

With its review completed this past week, JEP 415, Context-Specific Deserialization Filters, was promoted from Proposed to Target to Integrated status.

As per the JDK 17 release scheduleMark Reinhold, chief architect, Java Platform Group at Oracle, formally declared that JDK 17 has entered Rampdown Phase One. This means that the main-line source repository has been forked to the JDK stabilization repository and no additional JEPs will be added for JDK 17. Therefore, the final set of 14 features for the GA release in September include:

More details may be found in the release notes and developers are encouraged to report bugs via the Java Bug Database.

#open jdk #quarkus #spring #jboss wildfly #helidon #java #spring boot #devops #development #architecture & design #news

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Java News Roundup - Week of June 7th, 2021
Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1600135200

How to Install OpenJDK 11 on CentOS 8

What is OpenJDK?

OpenJDk or Open Java Development Kit is a free, open-source framework of the Java Platform, Standard Edition (or Java SE). It contains the virtual machine, the Java Class Library, and the Java compiler. The difference between the Oracle OpenJDK and Oracle JDK is that OpenJDK is a source code reference point for the open-source model. Simultaneously, the Oracle JDK is a continuation or advanced model of the OpenJDK, which is not open source and requires a license to use.

In this article, we will be installing OpenJDK on Centos 8.

#tutorials #alternatives #centos #centos 8 #configuration #dnf #frameworks #java #java development kit #java ee #java environment variables #java framework #java jdk #java jre #java platform #java sdk #java se #jdk #jre #open java development kit #open source #openjdk #openjdk 11 #openjdk 8 #openjdk runtime environment

Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1621246860

Java News Roundup - Week of April 5th, 2021

It has been a relatively quiet week for OpenJDK and JEP news. JEP 409: Sealed Classes and JEP 410: Remove the Experimental AOT and JIT Compiler have been promoted to Candidate status, although they are still not targeted for any release.

The latter of these marks the end of the road for the Graal compiler in OpenJDK. The Experimental JVMCI interface for compilers will still be present in OpenJDK but the Java-in-Java version of Graal will no longer be shipped. Development of the Graal technology will still continue in Oracle’s GraalVM project, however.

Elsewhere, Apache Maven released version 3.8.1 of the popular Java build tool.

Google introduced TestParameterInjector, a parameterized test runner. This tool is for JUnit 4, as JUnit 5 already supports parametrized tests through the junit-jupiter-params library.

In the Enterprise Java space, the 2021 Jakarta EE Developer Survey was launched and is open through April 30, 2021.

Payara announced the release of version 5.2021.2 of Payara Platform Community. As well as the community release, Payara Platform Enterprise 5.27.0 was also launched and comes with a range of improvements and new features, including an update to the Upgrade Tool; an automated JBatch Job execution data cleanup feature, and the arrival of a pluggable Notifier API.

The Glassfish application server is now Java 16 compatible - this means Glassfish joins the growing number of popular Java libraries and frameworks that are known to be Java 16 compatible.

Unlike other recent Java feature releases, Java 16 has an additional barrier to adoption - in the form of JEP 396. This JEP changes the default permission for reflective access to the JDK internals to Deny (from previously permitting and issuing a warning), although in Java 16 it is still possible to restore the status quo ante by use of a command-line flag.

This change means that, without user intervention, applications that depend on libraries that still leverage encapsulation-breaking access to the internals will now stop working. This makes the migration to Java 16 potentially less smooth than for other version upgrades.

This has been discussed on the Twitter hashtag #AllTestsGreenOnJDK16 promoted by Mark Reinhold and others.

#maven #jakarta ee #java #open jdk #java 16 #java ee #development #architecture & design #devops #news

Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1620458875

Going Beyond Java 8: Local Variable Type Inference (var) - DZone Java

According to some surveys, such as JetBrains’s great survey, Java 8 is currently the most used version of Java, despite being a 2014 release.

What you are reading is one in a series of articles titled ‘Going beyond Java 8,’ inspired by the contents of my book, Java for Aliens. These articles will guide you step-by-step through the most important features introduced to the language, starting from version 9. The aim is to make you aware of how important it is to move forward from Java 8, explaining the enormous advantages that the latest versions of the language offer.

In this article, we will talk about the most important new feature introduced with Java 10. Officially called local variable type inference, this feature is better known as the **introduction of the word **var. Despite the complicated name, it is actually quite a simple feature to use. However, some observations need to be made before we can see the impact that the introduction of the word var has on other pre-existing characteristics.

#java #java 11 #java 10 #java 12 #var #java 14 #java 13 #java 15 #verbosity

Sigrid  Farrell

Sigrid Farrell

1624096699

Java News Roundup - Week of June 7th, 2021

This week’s roundup features news from OpenJDK and JDK 17 moving to Rampdown Phase One, JDK 18, a new Helidon extension for Visual Studio Code, JFR support in GraalVM native images, Quarkus 1.13 maintenance release, WildFly 24 Beta1, and updates to Spring Framework and Spring Boot.

OpenJDK and JDK 17

In the JDK 17 early access builds, Build 26 features numerous changes from Build 25 that include fixes to various issues.

With its review completed this past week, JEP 415, Context-Specific Deserialization Filters, was promoted from Proposed to Target to Integrated status.

As per the JDK 17 release scheduleMark Reinhold, chief architect, Java Platform Group at Oracle, formally declared that JDK 17 has entered Rampdown Phase One. This means that the main-line source repository has been forked to the JDK stabilization repository and no additional JEPs will be added for JDK 17. Therefore, the final set of 14 features for the GA release in September include:

More details may be found in the release notes and developers are encouraged to report bugs via the Java Bug Database.

#open jdk #quarkus #spring #jboss wildfly #helidon #java #spring boot #devops #development #architecture & design #news

Joseph  Murray

Joseph Murray

1622095740

Java News Roundup - Week of March 8th, 2021

It has been a fairly busy week in the core OpenJDK community, including new developments related to Projects Valhalla, Lilliput, and Loom.

The big news is that John Rose has published a paper entitled “Design for the Parametric JVM” - this work is very early stage and still very theoretical. The overall goal of the design is to support generic programming, using Java’s current generics constructs but adding in inline types from Project Valhalla. The end result is intended to be the Java answer to the questions of “reified generics” and “type erasure”.

InfoQ will cover this work in detail when it is closer to the domain of the practitioner, but this is potentially the most significant JVM-level work since the addition of the invokedynamic bytecode.

Roman Kennke announced the kick-off of a new proposed project, Project Lilliput. This project intends to reduce the size of the JVMs object header down to 64 bits. The project could significantly improve heap memory usage including higher allocation rates and reduced GC pressure.

There were also new early access binaries from Project Loom, although there continues to be no indication of when Loom might appear as a preview version on the mainline builds.

#java #java ee #open jdk #hibernate #jetty #glassfish #development #architecture & design #devops #news