Best 22 Visual Studio Code Extensions for Web Development

Best 22 Visual Studio Code Extensions for Web Development

Best Visual Studio Code Extensions for Web Development. One of the most impressive parts of Visual Studio Code is customizability, especially via extensions. If you’re a web developer, you won’t be able to live without installing these extensions!

Best Visual Studio Code Extensions for Web Development. One of the most impressive parts of Visual Studio Code is customizability, especially via extensions. If you’re a web developer, you won’t be able to live without installing these extensions!

Want to improve your Web Development workflow? You won't be able to live without installing these extensions for Visual Studio Code!

Table of Contents

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Check out Learn Visual Studio Code to learn everything you need to know about about the hottest editor in Web Development for just Check out Learn Visual Studio Code to learn everything you need to know about about the hottest editor in Web Development for just $10!0!## 1. Debugger for chrome

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=msjsdiag.debugger-for-chrom

Believe it or not, debugging JavaScript means more than just writing console.log() statements (although that’s a lot of it). Chrome has features built in that make debugging a much better experience. This extension gives you all (or close to all) of those debugging features right inside of VS Code!

2. Javascript (ES6) Code Snippets

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=xabikos.JavaScriptSnippets

I loooove snippet extensions. I’m a firm believer that there’s no need to retype the same piece of code over and over again. This extensions provides you with snippets for popular pieces of modern (ES6) JavaScript code.

Side note…if you’re not using ES6 JavaScript features, you should be!

3. ESLint

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=dbaeumer.vscode-eslint

Want to write better code? Want consistent formatting across your team? Install ESLint. This extension can be configured to auto format your code as well as “yell” with linting errors/warnings. VS Code specifically is also perfectly configured to show you these errors/warnings.

Check out the ESLint docs for more info.

4. Live server

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=ritwickdey.LiveServer

Make changes in code editor, switch to browser, and refresh to see changes. That’s the endless cycle of a developer, but what if your browser would automatically refresh anytime you make changes? That’s where Live Server comes in!

It also runs your app on a localhost server. There are some things you can only test when running your app from a server, so this is a nice benefit.

5. Bracket Pair Colorizor

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=CoenraadS.bracket-pair-colorizer

Brackets are the bane of a developer’s existence. With tons of nested code, it gets almost impossible to determine which brackets match up with each other. Bracket Pair Colorizer (as you might expect) colors matching brackets to make your code much more readable. Trust me, you want this!

6. Auto Rename Tag

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=formulahendry.auto-rename-tag

Need to rename an element in HTML? Well, with Auto Rename Tag, you just need to rename either the opening or closing tag, and the other will be renamed automatically. Simple, but effective!

7. Quokka

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=WallabyJs.quokka-vscode

Need a quick place to test out some JavaScript? I used to open up the console in Chrome and type some code right there, but there were many downsides. Quokka gives you a JavaScript (and TypeScript) scratchpad in VS Code. This means you can test out a piece of code right there in your favorite editor!

8. Path Intellisense

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=christian-kohler.path-intellisense

In large projects, remembering specific file names and the directories your files are in can get tricky. This extension will provide you intellisense for just that. As you start typing a path in quotations, you will get intellisense for directories and file names. This will save you from spending a lot of time in the file explorer :)

9. Project Manager

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=alefragnani.project-manager

One thing I hate is switching between projects in VS Code. Every time I have to open the file explorer and find the project on my computer. But that changes with Project Manager. With this extension, you get an extra menu in your side menu for your projects. You can quickly switch between projects, save favorites, or auto-detect projects Git projects from your file system.

If you work on multiple different projects, this is a great way to stay organized and be more efficient.

10. Editor Config

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=EditorConfig.EditorConfig

Editor Config is a standard of a handlful of coding styles that are respected across major text editors/IDEs. Here’s how it works. You save a config file in your repository which your editor respects. In this case, you have to add an extension to VS Code for it to respect these config files. Super easy to setup and works great on team projects.

Read more on the Editor Config Docs.

11. Sublime Text Keymap

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=ms-vscode.sublime-keybindings

Are you an avid Sublime user, nervous to switch over to VS Code? This extension will make you feel right at home, by changing all of the shortcuts to match those of Sublime. Now, what excuse do you have for not switching over?

12. Browser Preview

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=auchenberg.vscode-browser-preview

I love the Live Server extension (mentioned above), but his extension goes another step further in terms of convenience. It gives you a live-reloading preview right inside of VS Code. No more having to tab over to your browser to see a small change!

13. Git Lens

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=eamodio.gitlens

There a bunch of git extensions out there, but one is the most powerful with tons of features. You get blame information, line and file history, commit searching, and so much more. If you need help with your Git workflow, start with this extension!

14. Polacode

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=pnp.polacode

You know those fancy code screenshots you see in articles and tweets? Well, most likely they came from Polacode. It’s super simple to use. Copy a piece of code to your clipboard, open up the extension, paste the code, and click to save your image!

15. Prettier

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=esbenp.prettier-vscode

DONT spend time formatting your code…just DONT. There’s no need to. Ealier, I mentioned ESLint which provides formatting and linting. If you don’t need the linting part, then go with Prettier. It’s super easy to setup and can be configured to formatted your code automatically on save.

Never worry about formatting again!

16. Better Comments

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=aaron-bond.better-comments

This extension color codes various types of comments to give them different significance and stand out from the rest of your code. I use this ALL THE TIME for todo comments. It’s hard to ignore a big orange comment telling me I’ve got some unfinished work to do.

There are also color codes for questions, alerts, and highlights. You can also add your own!

17. Git Link

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=qezhu.gitlink

If you’ve ever wanted to view a file that you’re working on in Github, this extension is for you. After installing, just right-click in your file and you’ll see the option to open it in Github. This is great for checking history, branch versions, etc. if you’re not using the Git Lens extension.

18. VS Code Icons

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=robertohuertasm.vscode-icons

Did you know you can customize the icons in VS Code? If you look in settings, you’ll seen an option for “File Icon Theme”. From there you can choose from the pre-installed icons or install an icon pack. This extension gives you a pretty sweet icon pack that is used by over 11 million people!

19. Material Icon Theme

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=PKief.material-icon-theme

Fan of Google’s Material design? Then, check out this Material themed icon pack. There’s hundreds of different icons and they are pretty awesome looking!

20. Settings Sync

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=Shan.code-settings-sync

Developers, myself included, spend a lot of time customizing their dev environment, especially their text editors. With the Settings Sync extension, you can save your setting off in Github. Then, you can load them to any new version of VS Code with one command. Don’t get caught without your amazing setup ever again!

21. Better Align

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=wwm.better-align

If you’re the kind of person who loves perfect alignment in your code, you need to get Better Align. You can align multiple variable declarations, trailing comments, sections of code, etc. There’s no better way to get a feel for how amazing this extension is than installing it and giving it a try!

22. VIM

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=vscodevim.vim

Are you a VIM power user? Bless you if you are, but you can take all of that VIM power user knowledge and use it right inside VS Code. Not the path I personally want to go, but I know how insane productivity can be when using VIM to its potential, so more power to you.

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Visual Studio Code Settings and Extensions for Faster JavaScript Development

Visual Studio Code Settings and Extensions for Faster JavaScript Development

Visual Studio Code Settings and Extensions for Faster JavaScript Development

I have been using Visual Studio Code for more than two years, when I jumped on it from Sublime Text.

I spend about 5–6 hours every day inside VS Code so it’s imperative that it is tailored to my needs to make me as productive as possible. Over the years, I have tried many extensions and settings but now I feel settled with what I have so it’s worth talking about them.

Extensions

Prettier Code Formatter

I use Prettier for code formatting across all of my projects and I’ve set up this extension so that it automatically formats my HTML/CSS/JS when I hit ⌘ + S. This has allowed me to get rid of language-specific code formatters.

npm

I use this extension along with npm intellisense (below) to ensure that my package.json is up to date and not bloated with modules that I am not using.

npm Intellisense

This extension indexes my package.json and allows me to autocomplete my import statements when requiring modules.

Bracket Pair Colorizer

This extension color codes all of my brackets, allowing me to quickly see where each code block starts and ends.

React Refactor

This is the newest extension that I have added to my arsenal and I really like it. It lets you select some JSX and refactor it out into a custom React Class, function, or hook.

Auto Close Tag

Another simple extension that does one thing well: auto-closes my JSX tags.

GitLens

I recently moved from the native Source Control setting that VSCode has to Gitlens. I like this extension because it lets me:

  • Automatically see the git blame for the current line
  • View a more detailed history on hover
  • Reset changes via the gutter

Simple React Snippets

I write so much React code that I needed an extension to help me save some time. I now use this extension to fill in some of the boilerplate that comes along with writing React components.

Markdown All in One

This extension helps me a lot when writing READMEs, or other Markdown documents. I specifically enjoy how it deals with lists, tables, and table of contents.

User Settings

Apart from the extensions, the other aspect of customizing your VS Code experience are your User Settings. I have shared my complete Settings file below, but here are some of the important bits:

Font Settings

I really like fonts with ligatures. If you are unfamiliar with ligatures, they are special characters that parses and joins multiple characters. I primarily use Fira Code as my programming font. Here’s how it renders JavaScript:

My complete font stack is:

"editor.fontFamily": "'Fira Code', 'Operator Mono', 'iA Writer Duospace', 'Source Code Pro', Menlo, Monaco, monospace", "editor.fontLigatures": true,

To detect indentation, I also prefer these settings:

"editor.detectIndentation": true, 
"editor.renderIndentGuides": false,

To help manage my imports, I prefer these:

// Enable auto-updating of import paths when you rename a file. "javascript.updateImportsOnFileMove.enabled": "always",

Emmet

Emmet now comes included with VS Code now, but to make it work well with React, I had to update some of the settings.

"emmet.includeLanguages": { 
  "javascript": "javascriptreact", 
  "jsx-sublime-babel-tags": "javascriptreact"
}, 
"emmet.triggerExpansionOnTab": true, "emmet.showExpandedAbbreviation": "never",

Here’s my complete user-settings.json

{
  "editor.formatOnSave": true,
  // Enable per-language
  "[javascript]": {
    "editor.formatOnSave": true
  },
  "[json]": {
    "editor.formatOnSave": true
  },
  "emmet.syntaxProfiles": {
    "javascript": "jsx",
    "xml": {
      "attr_quotes": "single"
    }
  },
  "editor.lineHeight": 22,
  "javascript.validate.enable": false,
  "workbench.editor.enablePreview": false,
  "javascript.updateImportsOnFileMove.enabled": "always",
  "prettier.trailingComma": "all",
  "bracketPairColorizer.forceIterationColorCycle": true,
  "editor.fontWeight": "500",
  "editor.fontLigatures": true,
  "editor.letterSpacing": 0.5,
  "editor.cursorWidth": 5,
  "editor.renderWhitespace": "all",
  "editor.snippetSuggestions": "top",
  "editor.glyphMargin": true,
  "editor.minimap.enabled": false,
  "terminal.integrated.fontWeight": "400",
  "editor.fontFamily": "Fira Code, iA Writer Duospace, Menlo, Monaco, 'Courier New', monospace",
  "editor.fontSize": 14,
  "window.zoomLevel": -1,
  "files.trimTrailingWhitespace": true,
  "files.trimFinalNewlines": true,
  "workbench.fontAliasing": "auto",
  "terminal.integrated.macOptionIsMeta": true,

  "prettier.bracketSpacing": true,
  "terminal.integrated.fontSize": 14,
  "terminal.integrated.fontWeightBold": "700",
  "terminal.integrated.lineHeight": 1.6,
  "workbench.colorTheme": "Shades of Purple",
  // SOP's Import Cost Extension Settings.
  "importCost.largePackageColor": "#EC3A37F5",
  "importCost.mediumPackageColor": "#B362FF",
  "importCost.smallPackageColor": "#B362FF"
}

For more tips and tricks about Visual Studio Code, I recommend checking out VSCode Can Do That.

*Originally published by Tilo at *tilomitra.com 

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Learn More

☞ Learn Visual Studio Code

☞ Visual Studio Code Crash Course 2019

☞ The Complete JavaScript Course 2019: Build Real Projects!

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☞ Svelte.js - The Complete Guide

☞ The Complete JavaScript Course 2019: Build Real Projects!

☞ Become a JavaScript developer - Learn (React, Node,Angular)

☞ JavaScript: Understanding the Weird Parts

☞ Vue JS 2 - The Complete Guide (incl. Vue Router & Vuex)

☞ The Full JavaScript & ES6 Tutorial - (including ES7 & React)

☞ JavaScript - Step By Step Guide For Beginners

☞ The Web Developer Bootcamp

Top 10 Visual Studio Code Tips and Features for developers

Top 10 Visual Studio Code Tips and Features for developers

Visual Studio Code is a fundamental programming tool for editing the source code of computer programs. It is developed by Microsoft for working in Windows, Linux, and Mac operating systems. This application is free and open source for both private and commercial use.

Here is a list of 10 tricks every developer should know in Visual Studio Code.

Command Palette

The Command Palette allows you to access various available commands just by typing a keyword instead of navigating through menus.

The Command Palette can be opened with the key combination Ctrl+Shift+P. You can then type relevant keywords to see a list of commands in the drop-down window.

Command Palette

Zen Mode

Zen Mode is a distraction-free view. All the extra toolboxes and bars in your window will be removed, allowing you to completely focus on your code.

Jump to and from Zen mode by selecting View > Appearance > Toggle Zen Mode.

Also, you can center-align your code in Zen Mode to experience a view like a document editor. Jump in and out of the centered layout by selecting View > Appearance > Toggle Centered Layout.

Centered Code in Zen Mode

Split View

If you’re good at multitasking, and you are working on two different files of the same project simultaneously, or need to check the difference between two files, then go to the split view.

The split view can be customized based on your preferences, whether you like to lay out files vertically or horizontally.

You can achieve the split view by selecting View > Editor Layout > Split Up.

Comparing Files in Split View

Git Integration

Visual Studio Code comes with Git integration that allows you to commit, pull, and push your code changes to a remote Git repository.

Open a file in a Visual Studio Code that belongs to a Git repository. The editor will show the difference between the working copy and the current file in a remote repository. This won’t work without an internet connection; one is required to stay connected with the Git repository.

Check out this cheat sheet for all the Git commands.

Code Difference between Working Copy and Code Base

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New themes and plugins

VS Code lets you apply a theme to the syntax highlighting of text in the editor based on your preferences. You can find many themes in the VS Marketplace that are absolutely free.

List of Themes for VS Code

Also, VS Code has a rich plugin API, which allows users to create awesome plugins. Some of the most popular plugins are:

  • Settings Sync: The most common settings plugin. It allows you to sync your VS Code installations on different devices.
  • Docker: Developing with Docker can sometimes mean running complex Docker commands and monitoring them. Installing this Docker extension adds some helpful Docker tools, such as generating Docker files, Docker file IntelliSense, and even monitoring.
Tag wrapping

Emmet is a plugin that saves time and improves developer productivity by helping you type less but generate more code.

Emmet allows you to get the corresponding tags from the abbreviated code you are typing. You can see an example in the following screenshot. Check out this list of all the pre-supported tag wraps in Emmet.

Tag Wrapping Using Emmet

Command Line in VS Code

VS Code comes with an integrated command-line terminal. On Windows, this terminal shows up as the Command Prompt. On Mac and Linux, it shows up as a Bash prompt. Either way, the terminal starts off in the current project’s working directory if one is loaded, or from your home folder if no project is loaded.

The command line interface lets you control how you launch the editor. You can open files, install extensions, change the display languages, and output diagnostics through its options.

It also supports the ability to have multiple, separate terminals. Just click the + icon at the top right to spawn more terminal instances or click the trash can icon to close the current terminal.

Command Line in VS Code

Exclude Folders

You can use the exclude folder option to remove unwanted folders like node_modules or others you don’t want to open in Visual Studio Code.

To exclude a folder, go to File > Preferences, and search for file.exclude in the search settings. You can add the pattern of the folder you don’t want Visual Studio Code to open.

Excluding Folder

Edit Multiple Lines Simultaneously

Just copying and pasting code is a bit old fashioned. In VS Code, you can edit multiple lines by adding cursors to different locations. This is very useful if you are going to use the same code on different lines. Instead of copying and pasting the code in all places, you can hold Alt and click to add a cursor in the places you want to type or edit the code. After adding cursors, edit the code to see the changes in the places where the cursors were added.

Editing Multiple Lines Simultaneously

Go to Definition

While programming or scripting, you’ll often run into a variable or method that you don’t recognize. You could spend several minutes searching for the right file, or you could hold Command (on Mac) or Ctrl (on Windows) and click the variable or method name. VS Code will then take you to its definition.

Or, you could just hold Command (on Mac) or Ctrl (on Windows) and hover the pointer over the variable or method to see an inline definition at the position of the cursor.

Inspecting a Variable in a Pop-up

Conclusion

I hope you have enjoyed learning some new tricks in making effective use of Visual Studio Code. Know a trick in VS Code and feel it would be helpful for others? Share it as a comment below. We will add it in another blog.

Originally published by Hari Prasath  at dzone.com

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