The Great Slacklash Is Coming

Sitting among peers at a gathering a few years ago, an exasperated Silicon Valley CEO seemed ready to get rid of Slack. “It’s one of my biggest regrets,” he said.

The app was fueling drama inside his company, and he wondered aloud whether it was worth the trouble. From a few feet away, I was surprised to overhear anything other than the often-repeated mantra that Slack would replace email. Yet since then, more executives have privately confessed concerns about how workplace chat apps were upending their cultures.

“They create problems, high-school-type problems,” one CEO of a midsized firm told me. “People are making fun of co-workers, they’re acting unprofessionally, and it’s technically a company system.”

A reckoning for workplace chat apps like Slack and Microsoft Teams is coming; just ask the people who pay for them. As companies deploy these systems en masse — and rely on them to work from home — executives are starting to confront a set of issues that early adopters know well. Workplace chat can amplify corporate infighting, help divide companies like social media divides countries, and facilitate employee organizing. Top executives, not employees, sign the checks for these services. And though they’re unlikely to get rid of them, many will inevitably crack down on their freewheeling nature.

“A lot of my CEO and founder friends talk about this,” one venture capitalist, who asked to remain anonymous because being bearish on Slack would harm his brand, told me. “The problematic employee, the employee who would sit around at the lunchroom and tell people how bad this place is — that’s just happening on Slack, and it’s amplifying.”

#technology #slack #big-technology #culture #business #big data

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The Great Slacklash Is Coming

The Great Slacklash Is Coming

Sitting among peers at a gathering a few years ago, an exasperated Silicon Valley CEO seemed ready to get rid of Slack. “It’s one of my biggest regrets,” he said.

The app was fueling drama inside his company, and he wondered aloud whether it was worth the trouble. From a few feet away, I was surprised to overhear anything other than the often-repeated mantra that Slack would replace email. Yet since then, more executives have privately confessed concerns about how workplace chat apps were upending their cultures.

“They create problems, high-school-type problems,” one CEO of a midsized firm told me. “People are making fun of co-workers, they’re acting unprofessionally, and it’s technically a company system.”

A reckoning for workplace chat apps like Slack and Microsoft Teams is coming; just ask the people who pay for them. As companies deploy these systems en masse — and rely on them to work from home — executives are starting to confront a set of issues that early adopters know well. Workplace chat can amplify corporate infighting, help divide companies like social media divides countries, and facilitate employee organizing. Top executives, not employees, sign the checks for these services. And though they’re unlikely to get rid of them, many will inevitably crack down on their freewheeling nature.

“A lot of my CEO and founder friends talk about this,” one venture capitalist, who asked to remain anonymous because being bearish on Slack would harm his brand, told me. “The problematic employee, the employee who would sit around at the lunchroom and tell people how bad this place is — that’s just happening on Slack, and it’s amplifying.”

#technology #slack #big-technology #culture #business #big data

Ian  Robinson

Ian Robinson

1623994140

Data and analytics: Delivering Clarity At A Time Of Great Uncertainty

TrueCue reveals the top data analytics priorities for 2021 and beyond

Looking back over the past year, it’s clear that for many organisations, regardless of size or industry, technology was invoked to survive the crisis. Much has been reported about the rapid migration to the cloud and the move to support remote working but according to James Don-Carolis, Managing Director of TrueCue, data, and the value which can be obtained from actionable, business intelligence, often acts as the differentiator between success and failure:

“Economic challenges will still make it problematic for businesses to get a full sense of what lies ahead but in order to traverse the current and post-pandemic landscape, those organisations able to make insight-driven decisions will be far more likely to prosper in the coming months and years.”

In light of this Don-Carolis, outlines three key data and analytics trends that will characterise the most forward-thinking businesses in 2021.

#big data #latest news #data analytics #great uncertainty #delivering clarity #data and analytics: delivering clarity at a time of great uncertainty

Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1598222100

Artificial Intelligence: With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

The experts predicted it. They’ve been trying to alert the rest, but few pay them any mind. It’s now affecting aspects of our lives that we never anticipated: healthcare, education, employment, and even national security. We hear that our lives will never be the same, but how many really believe what they’re being told … or can even understand what’s happening?

Is this another piece about the coronavirus pandemic? Hardly. I’m talking about artificial intelligence: the big AI. Many still discuss AI as prophecy, something “New Age”. Others locate AI in the future, saying “We are on the cusp of colossal changes”.

That’s half right. The changes are colossal, but we passed the cusp nearly 70 years ago.

It’s here

AI’s superficial uses have become commonplace and obvious. Digital assistants, autonomous vehicles, and smart homes clearly use AI, but they’re just gadgets. The meaningful changes are much deeper but harder to see. By one estimate, algorithmic trading already accounted for 90% of equity transactions three years ago, adding up to an annual transaction volume of about $100 trillion under the control of machines. The three largest American cities have been testing and implementing predictive policing programs. Even small-time political radicals have discovered AI’s potential to generate propaganda. These changes are both momentous and largely invisible. While _momentous_and invisible are qualities of well-designed AI, they are a little ominous.

Most people — especially those still largely oblivious to AI — are likely to feel its effects most acutely in the job market. According to one report, up to 14% of the global workforce could be replaced by machines within a decade. That’s just two or three presidential terms from now. The shock to labor will equal the peak of US unemployment during the pandemic, but the AI shock will be permanent, and it is likely to accelerate over time. Dealing with 15% unemployment under current conditions is almost overwhelming. What will we do with 40% irrelevance — a new useless class?

It’s not a crisis. It’s a revolution.

#innovation #venture-capital #technology #investing #artificial-intelligence #artificial intelligence

Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1626711240

With Great Angular Components Comes Great (Single) Responsibility

One of the recent requirements in our  application was to create a dynamic actions menu component that takes a list of actions and displays them inside a  popover.

The component can be rendered multiple times, as part of different views. One of the views is a cell renderer inside our grids. In such a case, we need to run some specific functionality when we toggle the visibility of the menu. One way to solve this is to use an input that will indicate if we’re in a grid context:

import { TippyModule } from '@ngneat/helipopper';
import { SvgIconsModule } from '@ngneat/svg-icon';

@Component({
  template: `
    <svg-icon key="chevron" [tippy]="menu" (visible)="onVisible($event)"></svg-icon>

    <ng-template #menu>
      ... render the actions
    </ng-template>
  `,
  changeDetection: ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush,
})
export class ResourceActionsComponent {
  @Input() actions: Action[];
  @Input() isGridContext = false;

  onVisible($event) {
    if(this.isGridContext) { ... }
  }
}

@NgModule({
  declarations: [ResourceActionsComponent],
  imports: [CommonModule, TippyModule, SvgIconsModule],
  exports: [ResourceActionsComponent],
})
export class ResourceActionsModule {}

I’m skipping the implementation of the component because it’s not relevant to this article. We’ll discuss it in a future one.

To be honest, I’m not very happy with this implementation. Let’s stop for a second and think about it. Is this the responsibility of the action menu component? Does this component need to be aware of the grid? The answer is no. The single responsibility of the component is to get a list of actions, render and manage them.

#angular #angular2 #javascript

Kabanda  Nat

Kabanda Nat

1624937104

Which Should Come First: Website Design or Copy?

When the web designer has already finalized the web design, the copywriter has no way but to make the design work.
What could be the drawbacks if that happens?

  1. The content length may be too long than required and the copywriter may be forced to fill it with fluff.
  2. The content length may be so short that the copywriter wouldn’t have the space to describe the product in detail.
  3. In a detailed design with specific word length for each section, the copywriter would be restricted to explore more.
  4. When the copywriter exceeds the word count of individual blocks, it can disrupt the alignment of the complete design.

#website design #web dev #come first