Top 23 JavaScript Debugging Tips Like a Professional

Top 23 JavaScript Debugging Tips Like a Professional

We've put together a list of 23 debugging tips that you may not know, but might want to keep in mind for next time you find yourself needing to debug your JavaScript code!

Knowing your tools can make a significant difference when it comes to getting things done. Despite JavaScript's reputation as being difficult to debug, if you keep a couple of tricks up your sleeve errors and bugs will take less time to resolve.

So hopefully now, I can give you some tips which you didn’t know before, and which will make you a PRO debugger. We've put together a list of 23 debugging tips that you may not know, but might want to keep in mind for next time you find yourself needing to debug your JavaScript code!

1. ‘debugger;’

After console.log, 'debugger;' is my favorite quick and dirty debugging tool. Once it's in your code, Chrome will automatically stop there when executing. You can even wrap it in conditionals, so it only runs when you need it.

if (thisThing) {
    debugger;
}
2. console.trace()

If you want to know where the log is being prompted from use console.trace() to get the stack trace with the logged data.

3. console.time() && console.timeEnd()

If you are trying to find a sneaky performance issue, start counting time with console.time() and print with console.timeEnd().

It can be super useful to know exactly how long something has taken to execute, especially when debugging slow loops. You can even set up multiple timers by assigning a label to the method. Let’s see how it works:

console.time('Timer1');

var items = [];

for(var i = 0; i < 100000; i++){
   items.push({index: i});
}

console.timeEnd('Timer1');

This has produced the following result:

4. console.memory

If your performance issue is even trickier, and you are looking for a sneaky memory leak, you might like to try and utilize console.memory (property, not a function) to check out your heap size status.

5. console.profile(‘profileName’) & console.profileEnd(‘profileName’)

This is not standard, but is widely supported. You can start and end a browser performance tool - performance profile from the code using console.profile(‘profileName’) and then console.profileEnd(‘profileName’). This will help you profile EXACTLY what you want, and prevents you from having to be mouse-click, timing dependent.

6. console.count(“STUFF I COUNT”)

In a case of recurring function or code, you can use console.count(‘?’) to keep count of how many times your code is read.

7. console.assert(false, “Log me!”)**

Yes, conditional logging without wrapping your logs with if-else :)

You can use console.assert(condition, msg) to log something when the condition is falsy.

*disclaimer — in Node.js this will throw Assertion Error!

8. console.group(‘group’) & console.groupEnd(‘group’)

After writing so many logs, you might want to organize them. A small and useful tool for that is the console.group() & console.groupEnd(). Using console group, your console logs are grouped together, while each grouping creates another level in the hierarchy. Calling groupEnd reduces one.

9 console.clear()

Well, having written so many logs, it’s now time to clear your console a little.

10 console.table()

Saving the best for last, this is a true gem in my opinion! You can actually print a very nice table with the objects you log using the console.table()

11. String substitutions

When logging, you can incorporate variables using string substitutions. These references should be types (%s = string, %i = integer, %o = object, %f = float).

12. Display objects as a table

Sometimes, you have a complex set of objects that you want to view. You can either console.log them and scroll through the list, or break out the console.table helper. Makes it easier to see what you’re dealing with!

var animals = [
    { animal: 'Horse', name: 'Henry', age: 43 },
    { animal: 'Dog', name: 'Fred', age: 13 },
    { animal: 'Cat', name: 'Frodo', age: 18 }
];
 
console.table(animals);

Will output:

13. Try all the sizes

While having every single mobile device on your desk would be awesome, it’s not feasible in the real world. How about resizing your viewport instead? Chrome provides you with everything you need. Jump into your inspector and click the ‘toggle device mode’ button. Watch your media queries come to life!

14. How to find your DOM elements quickly

Mark a DOM element in the elements panel and use it in your console. Chrome Inspector keeps the last five elements in its history so that the final marked element displays with $0, the second to last marked element $1 and so on.

If you mark following items in order ‘item-4′, ‘item-3’, ‘item-2’, ‘item-1’, ‘item-0’ then you can access the DOM nodes like this in the console:

15. Get the stack trace for a function

You probably know JavaScript frameworks, produce a lot of code – quickly.

It creates views and triggers events, so eventually you'll want to know what caused the function call.

Since JavaScript is not a very structured language, it can sometimes be hard to get an overview of what happened and when. This is when console.trace (or just trace in the console) comes handy to be able to debug JavaScript.

Imagine you want to see the entire stack trace for the function call funcZ in the car instance on line 33:

var car;
var func1 = function() {
	func2();
}

var func2 = function() {
	func4();
}
var func3 = function() {
}

var func4 = function() {
	car = new Car();
	car.funcX();
}
var Car = function() {
	this.brand = ‘volvo’;
	this.color = ‘red’;
	this.funcX = function() {
		this.funcY();
	}

	this.funcY = function() {
		this.funcZ();
	}

	this.funcZ = function() {
		console.trace(‘trace car’)
	}
}
func1();
var car; 
var func1 = function() {
	func2();
} 
var func2 = function() {
	func4();
}
var func3 = function() {
} 
var func4 = function() {
	car = new Car();
	car.funcX();
}
var Car = function() {
	this.brand = ‘volvo’;
	this.color = ‘red’;
	this.funcX = function() {
		this.funcY();
	}
	this.funcY = function() {
		this.funcZ();
	}
 	this.funcZ = function() {
		console.trace(‘trace car’)
	}
} 
func1();

Line 33 will output:

Now we can see that func1 called **func2, **which called func4. Func4 thencreated an instance of Car and then called the function car.funcX, and so on.

Even though you think you know your script well this can still be quite handy. Let’s say you want to improve your code. Get the trace and your great list of all related functions. Every single one is clickable, and you can now go back and forth between them. It’s like a menu just for you.

16. Unminify code as an easy way to debug JavaScript

Sometimes you may have an issue in production, and your source maps didn’t quite make it to the server. Fear not. Chrome can unminify your Javascript files to a more human-readable format. The code won’t be as helpful as your real code – but at the very least you can see what’s happening. Click the {} Pretty Print button below the source viewer in the inspector.

17. Quick-find a function to debug

Let’s say you want to set a breakpoint in a function.

The two most common ways to do that is:

Find the line in your inspector and add a breakpoint

Add a debugger in your script

In both of these solutions, you have to click around in your files to find the particular line you want to debug

What’s probably less common is to use the console. Use debug(funcName) in the console and the script will stop when it reaches the function you passed in.

It’s quick, but the downside is it doesn’t work on private or anonymous functions. But if that’s not the case, it’s probably the fastest way to find a function to debug. (Note: there’s a function called console.debug which is not the same thing.)

var func1 = function() {
	func2();
};

var Car = function() {
	this.funcX = function() {
		this.funcY();
	}

	this.funcY = function() {
		this.funcZ();
	}
}

var car = new Car();

Type debug(car.funcY) in the console and the script will stop in debug mode when it gets a function call to car.funcY:

18.  Black box scripts that are NOT relevant

Today we often have a few libraries and frameworks on our web apps. Most of them are well tested and relatively bug-free. But, the debugger still steps into all the files that have no relevance for this debugging task. The solution is to black box the script you don’t need to debug. This could also include your own scripts.

19. Find the important things in complex debugging

In more complex debugging we sometimes want to output many lines. One thing you can do to keep a better structure of your outputs is to use more console functions, for example, Console.log, console.debug, console.warn, console.info, console.error and so on. You can then filter them in your inspector. But sometimes this is not really what you want when you need to debug JavaScript. It’s now that YOU can get creative and style your messages. Use CSS and make your own structured console messages when you want to debug JavaScript:

console.todo = function(msg) {
	console.log(‘ % c % s % s % s‘, ‘color: yellow; background - color: black;’, ‘–‘, msg, ‘–‘);
}

console.important = function(msg) {
	console.log(‘ % c % s % s % s’, ‘color: brown; font - weight: bold; text - decoration: underline;’, ‘–‘, msg, ‘–‘);
}

console.todo(“This is something that’ s need to be fixed”);
console.important(‘This is an important message’);

Will output:

For example:

In the console.log() you can set %s for a string, %i for integers and %c for custom style. You can probably find better ways to use this. If you use a single page framework, you maybe want to have one style for view message and another for models, collections, controllers and so on. Maybe also name the shorter like wlog, clog and mlog use your imagination!

20. Watch specific function calls and its arguments

In the Chrome console, you can keep an eye on specific functions. Every time the function is called, it will be logged with the values that it was passed in.

var func1 = function(x, y, z) {
//....
};

Will output:

This is a great way to see which arguments are passed into a function. But I must say it would be good if the console could tell how many arguments to expect. In the above example, func1 expect 3 arguments, but only 2 is passed in. If that’s not handled in the code it could lead to a possible bug.

21. Quickly access elements in the console

A faster way to do a querySelector in the console is with the dollar sign. $(‘css-selector’) will return the first match of CSS selector. $$(‘css-selector’) will return all of them. If you are using an element more than once, it’s worth saving it as a variable.

22. Postman is great (but Firefox is faster)

Many developers are using Postman to play around with ajax requests. Postman is excellent, but it can be a bit annoying to open up a new browser window, write new request objects and then test them.

Sometimes it’s easier to use your browser.

When you do, you no longer need to worry about authentication cookies if you are sending to a password-secure page. This is how you would edit and resend requests in Firefox.

Open up the inspector and go to the network tab. Right-click on the desired request and choose Edit and Resend. Now you can change anything you want. Change the header and edit your parameters and hit resend.

Below I present a request twice with different properties:

23. Break on node change

The DOM can be a funny thing. Sometimes things change and you don’t know why. However, when you need to debug JavaScript, Chrome lets you pause when a DOM element changes. You can even monitor its attributes. In Chrome Inspector, right click on the element and pick a break on setting to use:

Hopefully, these tips make you’re debugging in your JavaScript bit more productive, and even a little fun! Thank you for reading! Please share if you liked it!

JavaScript Tutorial: if-else Statement in JavaScript

JavaScript Tutorial: if-else Statement in JavaScript

This JavaScript tutorial is a step by step guide on JavaScript If Else Statements. Learn how to use If Else in javascript and also JavaScript If Else Statements. if-else Statement in JavaScript. JavaScript's conditional statements: if; if-else; nested-if; if-else-if. These statements allow you to control the flow of your program's execution based upon conditions known only during run time.

Decision Making in programming is similar to decision making in real life. In programming also we face some situations where we want a certain block of code to be executed when some condition is fulfilled.
A programming language uses control statements to control the flow of execution of the program based on certain conditions. These are used to cause the flow of execution to advance and branch based on changes to the state of a program.

JavaScript’s conditional statements:

  • if
  • if-else
  • nested-if
  • if-else-if

These statements allow you to control the flow of your program’s execution based upon conditions known only during run time.

  • if: if statement is the most simple decision making statement. It is used to decide whether a certain statement or block of statements will be executed or not i.e if a certain condition is true then a block of statement is executed otherwise not.
    Syntax:
if(condition) 
{
   // Statements to execute if
   // condition is true
}

Here, condition after evaluation will be either true or false. if statement accepts boolean values – if the value is true then it will execute the block of statements under it.
If we do not provide the curly braces ‘{‘ and ‘}’ after if( condition ) then by default if statement will consider the immediate one statement to be inside its block. For example,

if(condition)
   statement1;
   statement2;

// Here if the condition is true, if block 
// will consider only statement1 to be inside 
// its block.

Flow chart:

Example:

<script type = "text/javaScript"> 

// JavaScript program to illustrate If statement 

var i = 10; 

if (i > 15) 
document.write("10 is less than 15"); 

// This statement will be executed 
// as if considers one statement by default 
document.write("I am Not in if"); 

< /script> 

Output:

I am Not in if
  • if-else: The if statement alone tells us that if a condition is true it will execute a block of statements and if the condition is false it won’t. But what if we want to do something else if the condition is false. Here comes the else statement. We can use the else statement with if statement to execute a block of code when the condition is false.
    Syntax:
if (condition)
{
    // Executes this block if
    // condition is true
}
else
{
    // Executes this block if
    // condition is false
}


Example:

<script type = "text/javaScript"> 

// JavaScript program to illustrate If-else statement 

var i = 10; 

if (i < 15) 
document.write("10 is less than 15"); 
else
document.write("I am Not in if"); 

< /script> 

Output:

i is smaller than 15
  • nested-if A nested if is an if statement that is the target of another if or else. Nested if statements means an if statement inside an if statement. Yes, JavaScript allows us to nest if statements within if statements. i.e, we can place an if statement inside another if statement.
    Syntax:
if (condition1) 
{
   // Executes when condition1 is true
   if (condition2) 
   {
      // Executes when condition2 is true
   }
}

Example:

<script type = "text/javaScript"> 

// JavaScript program to illustrate nested-if statement 

var i = 10; 

if (i == 10) { 

// First if statement 
if (i < 15) 
	document.write("i is smaller than 15"); 

// Nested - if statement 
// Will only be executed if statement above 
// it is true 
if (i < 12) 
	document.write("i is smaller than 12 too"); 
else
	document.write("i is greater than 15"); 
} 
< /script> 

Output:

i is smaller than 15
i is smaller than 12 too
  • if-else-if ladder Here, a user can decide among multiple options.The if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
if (condition)
    statement;
else if (condition)
    statement;
.
.
else
    statement;


Example:

<script type = "text/javaScript"> 
// JavaScript program to illustrate nested-if statement 

var i = 20; 

if (i == 10) 
document.wrte("i is 10"); 
else if (i == 15) 
document.wrte("i is 15"); 
else if (i == 20) 
document.wrte("i is 20"); 
else
document.wrte("i is not present"); 
< /script> 

Output:

i is 20

Learn JavaScript Crash Course | Best Javascript Tutorial

Learn JavaScript Crash Course | Best Javascript Tutorial

Take the first steps to mastering JavaScript, one of the fastest growing languages globally today. Because of its flexibility, it is there everywhere today: be it the web, mobile and or the desktop. Want to be one of the over 50,000 people who have benefited from this course? Join the learning fun!

Description
So you need to learn Javascript and learn it fast!

Are you a designer who's now adding JavaScript to your knowledge arsenal? Are you a student who needs a fast and high-quality JavaScript course? Are you a traditional developer trying to learn the basics? Are you applying for a job that requires JavaScript.

JavaScript is not only emerging as the most important language to know, it's flexibility is unique. With JavaScript being deployed on the web, mobile and even the desktop this is the one language that all technologists need to know. As a JavaScript developer you'll find opportunity around every corner!

This is a crash course meaning it moves quick. Every meaningful lecture is chock full of information that you can immediately apply to your coding work. Taught by a master instructor, you'll find that Javascript: Crash Course is a extremely efficient way to learn.

Each lecture course lecture includes the actual code developed by the master instructor during the lecture. No more staring at a blank screen when figuring out how to practice use the included code as a starting point.

The course culminates with developing a full quiz application called Trivia. You'll learn from building out this application yourself and modifying it and making it your own!

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Basic knowledge
Foundational HTML
Text editor
Web Browser
What will you learn
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Run Javascript Code in a Browser
Choose and Utilize Tools Used by Professional Javascript Developers
Understand the Purpose of Javascript Variables
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Obtain input from the User via Alert Boxes
Obtain input from the User via Forms
Understand Simple Conditionals with If
Create Complex Conditionals with If Else If
Create While Loops
Create For Loops
Understand the Purpose and Power of Javascript Objects
Use Event Objects to Track Events that Occur
Use the Javscript Date Object to Track Dates
Use the Javascript String Object to Manipulate Strings
Include Audio and Video Content with the Media API
Use the XMLHttpRequest() Object to Exchange Data
Create a Basic Ajax Request
Parse JSON code

20 Things to Learn and Effective tips to becoming JavaScript Master

20 Things to Learn and Effective tips to becoming JavaScript Master

Do you want to get into web development? Or perhaps you’re fascinated with code and software? If so then JavaScript is a good choice for you. In this post, we will for you 20 things to learn and Simple Effective tips on the way to becoming a JavaScript Master

10 THINGS TO LEARN

I guess you are a web developer. Hopefully you are doing fine and you have a great job, maybe you are even self-employed or working as a freelancer. Maybe you are just starting out as a web developer, maybe you have been working as a programmer for a longer period already.

However comfortable you are with JavaScript, it is always good to get a refresher on some topics to read up about or get them on the radar in the first place. Here are 10 things you definitely have to learn before you can call yourself a master in JavaScript.

1. Control Flow

Probably the most basic topic on the list. One of the most important, maybe the most important one. If you do not know how to proceed with your code, you will have a hard time. Knowing the ins and outs of basic control flow is definitely a must.

  • if else — If you don’t know these, how did you write code before?
  • switch — is basically if else in a more eloquent way, use it as soon as you have multiple of different cases.
  • for — Do not repeat yourself, this is what loops are for. Besides the normalfor -loop for of and for in come in very handy. The big advantage of for -loops is that they are blocking, so you can use async await in them.
  • Advanced conditionals — Using the ternary and logical operators can make your life a lot easier, especially when you try to do things inline, meaning that you don’t want to save values to use them later. Example:
// ternary
console.log(new Date().getHours() < 12 ? 'Good Morning!' : 'Time for a siesta')
// logical operators
const isJsMaster = prompt('Are you a JavaScript master?') === 'true'
console.log(isJsMaster && 'proficient coder')

2. Frontend Framework

The big three are React.js, Angular and Vue.js. If you are looking for a job nowadays, you will almost always have one of those listed as a prerequisite. Even if they change quite quickly, it is important to grasp the general concept of those to understand how applications work. Also, it is just easier to write apps that way. If you haven’t decided which train you want to jump on, my suggestions is React.js. I have been working with it for the last couple of years and did not regret my decision.

3. Asynchronity

This is a very important aspect of JavaScript, Either you are fetching data from the backend or you are processing requests asynchronously in the backend itself. In pretty much all usecases, you will encounter asynchronity and its caveats. If you have no idea what that is, you will probably get a weird error, which you will try to fix for a couple of hours. If you know what it is, but you don’t really know what to do about it, you will end up in callback-hell. The better approach is to use promises and/or async await in your apps.

4. Node.js / Express

Even as a frontend developer, you should know the basics of node.js. Ideally, you would also know how to spin up a simple express server and add some routes or change existing ones. JavaScript is great for writing scripts to help you automate a lot of tasks. Therefore, knowing how to read files, work with filepaths or buffers gives you a good toolset to build anything.

You may also like: Best Design Patterns for writing JavaScript Web applications

5. Error handling

This took a while for me. It does not matter if you are working on frontend or backend, the first year or so, you will probably default to console.log or maybe console.error for ‘handling’ errors. To write good applications, you definitely have to change that and replace your lazy logs with nicely handled errors. You may want to check out how to build your own Error constructor and how to catch them correctly, as well as showing the user what the actual problem is.

6. Data Models

Similar to moving through your application continuously, you have to decide where to group specific information chunks and where to keep them separate. This does not only apply to building database models, but also function parameters and objects or variables. Example:

const calcShape = (width, height, depth, color, angle) => {...}
const calcShape = ({width, height, depth, color, angle}) => {...}

7. DOM Manipulation

This is an interesting topic. Normally it is somewhat left out in the day today life as a developer. Maybe you learned jQuery and never felt the need to pick up some native DOM manipulation skills, maybe you are just using a frontend framework, where there is rarely a need for custom DOM manipulation. However, I think this is a crucial part of understanding JavaScript, at least in the frontend. Knowing how the DOM works and how to access elements gives you a deep understanding of how websites work. In addition, there will be the point where you have to do some custom DOM manipulation, even when you use modern frontend frameworks, and you definitely do not want to put jQuery in your package.json just to access an element.

8. Functional Approach

There is an everlasting debate about functional vs. object-oriented programming. You probably can achieve the same thing with both of the approaches. In JavaScript, it is even easier, you have both of the approaches available. Libraries like lodash give you a really nice collection of tools for building applications with a functional approach. Nowadays, it is not even necessary to use external libraries any more. A lot of the most important functions have been implemented in the official JavaScript specification. You definitely should know how to use map reduce filter forEach and find.

9. Object Oriented Approach

Similar to the functional approach, you also have to get familiar with object oriented JavaScript, if you want to master it. I neglected that part for a long time in my career and just worked my way through with a workaround, but sometimes it is definitely better to use objects/classes and instances to implement specific functionality. Classes are widely used in React, MobX or custom constructors.

10. Bundling / Transpilation

Unfortunately, this is a big part of web development. On the one hand I should not say unfortunate, because it is great to be able to write code with all the newest features. On the other hand, the reason why I’m saying that is that we always have to keep in mind that there’s older browsers around that may not support these features, therefore we have to transpile our code into something else that the old browsers understand. If you work with node.js, you will probably have less exposure to transpiling your code. The de-facto standard for transpilation is babel.js, so get familiar with it. As for bundling your code and tying everything together, you have a couple of options. Webpack was the dominant player for a long time. Some time ago, parcel popped up out of nowhere and is now my preferred solution, since it is so performant and easy to configure, although not perfect.

This is not specific to JavaScript, but incredibly helpful in a lot of use cases. Just as confusing as well. Getting to know the syntax of Regular Expressions definitely takes some time and remembering all of the different options is impossible.

10 SIMPLE and EFECTIVE TIPS

Do you want to get into web development? Or perhaps you’re fascinated with code and software? If so then JavaScript is a good choice for you.

Why JavaScript?

Javascript is the scripting language of the internet and one of the most essential web technologies along with HTML and CSS. It’s a high-level, interpreted programming language that conforms to the ECMAScript specification. In more simplistic terms, it’s what allows you to implement and display complex things on your webpage, to create content, to animate images and tons of other amazing possibilities with just a few lines of code.

There’re plenty of reasons to learn this wonderful programming language. The most important one is the fact that JavaScript runs everything and everywhere. Most of the prominent websites are built on the backbone of JavaScript while currently there are more than 3 billion devices be it Smartphones or desktops. JavaScript went through a massive surge of popularity and quickly become the most dominant language in the world of software. In light of this, it’s obvious that Javascript skills are in high demand by companies everywhere. For all these reasons and more, it’s lucrative to have JavaScript skills on your resume.

Why is it challenging?

Learning JavaScript is easier said than done. Newcomers often run into similar kinds of problems such as difficulties in understanding confusing concepts. Not only that, but JavaScript also has an ever-changing tooling landscape one that makes it even far more grueling to understand. It’s hard to find the motivation to complete a demanding task such as this. JavaScript is also a vigorously un-typed language which means that the same thing in one code can easily mean something different depending on the context and medium. It also is extremely hard to debug due to a non-existent support system for different classes.

Tips for JavaScript Beginner

So the question is how to learn JavaScript? Similar to every complicated thing in life, you can learn JavaScript coding through constant practice and by never giving up. To help you in this task, we have written down the best way of learning this skill just for you! Try to follow these tips to enhance your learning experience.

1. Keep experimenting & Interact with veterans

Find and make your own way to solve problems related to JavaScript. Keep experimenting with the problems and what you have learned so far. Also, do interact with the veterans as the large community lead to more support and help you’ll be able to receive. Fortunately, JavaScript has one of the largest internet communities that is all about giving and receiving help and exploring the world of JavaScript. Take advantage of that! Meet up with the experts to not only motivate yourself to study but to learn as well. You might even be offered a mentorship! By being a part of a community, you’ll also be able to keep up to date with new, innovative tools!

2. Do not rush! Go step by step

I know it’s tempting to move on immediately once you understand a concept, but don’t! Instead, play with what you have learned, get comfortable and even combine it with the previous lessons. Start from beginner’s level and cover all the topics from tutorials, check resources, implement what you have learned and when you are finally confident of your beginner level skills, then move on to the intermediate level and after that, to advance level. By limiting the learning content and keeping in touch with the previous lessons, you’ll be able to retain the material in your head and find it easier to remember key concepts. The process seems long for sure but it actually takes far less time since you don’t have to keep revising and is actually quite fun. There’s really nothing that you cannot do with JavaScript in regards to web development.

3. Look out for JavaScript Resources

The internet has millions of sources available for you to use. Take “JavaScript: The Definitive Guide” by David Flanagan. It’s a book that has been forever considered a bible for JavaScript programmers across the world. In it is a comprehensive guide that is well-organized and detailed for new programmers to learn and old programmers to revise. Another book that you can read is “You Don’t Know JS: Up and Going” by Kyle Simpson which provides the necessary background for those with limited knowledge about programming. The entire series introduces more complex and harder parts of the JavaScript language as you read on one book at a time. Furthermore, there are tons of articles, blog posts and even YouTube videos available for reference. Don’t waste these valuable resources!

You may also like: Keeping your JavaScript code clean forever and scalable

4. Right attitude

The first thing you need to do is to go with the right attitude to learn JavaScript. Learning JavaScript is going to become needlessly more bothersome if you approach it with the wrong mindset. Trying to learn it with an “I need to get this over” mindset is not going to take you anywhere. It’s a huge struggle to face and you truly have to be passionate about code to learn it. Not only that, you need to remind yourself to have fun with what you’re learning as JavaScript code is capable of astonishing things once you get the hang of it.

5. Start Slowly

A mistake many beginners make is that they directly start working on frameworks such as jQuery, AngularJS, Backbone, etc. You should never do it. Instead, you should start working on DataTypes and in-built methods. After getting enough of the fundamentals, you can try NodeJS. Trust me, NodeJS is very simple, just a JavaScript code backed up with inbuilt libraries. Then, you can try frameworks.

6. Find the perfect editor for JavaScript

You can’t code without a text editor. Fortunately, you have tons of options to choose from. To write JavaScript code, you can either use your Windows notepad or even download programs such as Notepad++ or Visual Studio Code. Either way, after going through all possible editors, choose the one that you’re most comfortable to work on as this is where you’ll be spending most of your time. Also when you’re starting out, it’s essential to choose an editor that has a simplistic interface and will support you as a beginner.

7. JavaScript Tutorials!

If you search the web for JavaScript tutorials, there are a vast number of tutorials available online on sites such as CodeAcademy, FreeCodeCamp, etc. If you’re a beginner then you should start from beginner level JavaScript tutorials and then move on to intermediate and advanced level. Tutorials are like doing grammar exercises and the sites with JavaScript tutorials are ideal for learning the basics and getting used to the syntax. Learning JavaScript is no different than learning French or Spanish. It takes time.

8. Start Ajax and Async after getting a hang of the basics

After you have spent quite a lot of time on JavaScript, start working on Ajax and Async concepts. Learn how to use different functions on JavaScript and use classes as well. All of these things take quite a lot of time to master but trust me; all your hard work will surely be rewarded.

9. Challenge yourself! Explore JavaScript and learn

When it comes to learning JavaScript, there is always something you can learn as it is a never-ending process. A lot of people end up never improving their JavaScript coding by spending too much time only doing what they are confident about. Make sure that you’re not one of them. Every time you finish a lesson, ask yourself if you have learned something you didn’t know before. That is the key to success. Be mindful of what you want to learn or improve your knowledge of. Make sure that you’re challenging yourself and growing as a developer instead of conforming to a single comfort zone.

10. Keep yourself up to date and be prepared

JavaScript isn’t an easy skill to learn. If it was, it wouldn’t be held with the same reverence as it is in the labor market now. You need to understand the fact that learning JavaScript would require a huge amount of time and dedication. It’s not going to be an easy road. Not only is JavaScript already a complex and intricate skill to master, but it is also a growing field which would require you to stay updated with the new web development practices. Prepare yourself that it’s going to consume a majority of your time. Be patient too. You’re not going to learn JavaScript in a month and maybe not even in a year. All the time spent is going to be grilling, demanding but remember that it will also be completely worth the trouble.

BONUS

Learning JavaScript is constant work and quite difficult but with the right attitude and determination, learning it can be an extremely satisfying experience. All you need is passion and a hunger to learn. Hopefully, with the above-mentioned tips, as well as the other brilliant and detailed materials available online, you’ll be able to grasp JavaScript as quickly as possible while also having a great enjoyable ride.

Hopefully you know all of the topics listed above already. If not, put in the work and try to become a master in JavaScript! It is definitely worth it. Remember that practicing is everything when it comes to coding, so even if you are not familiar with these concepts or know them but you don’t really know how to apply them, it will come in the future.

What do you think about the list? Is something missing? Do you think other topics are more important when coding? Let me know in the comments!

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