Why You Care About Homomorphic Encryption

The hype is dead, long live the hype. After deep learning, a new entry is about ready to go on stage. The usual journalists are warming up their keyboards for blogs, news feeds, tweets, in one word, hype. This time it’s all about privacy and data confidentiality. The new words, homomorphic encryption.

For the record, I am not personally against such a technology — quite the opposite I think it is very powerful and clever, rather against the misleading claims that usually make more followers than the technology itself. The purpose of this post is to shed light on homomorphic encryption, its benefits, and limitations, being as impartial as possible.

What is Homomorphic Encryption?

Homomorphic encryption (HE) is an encryption scheme that allows one to compute something like Encrypted(2) + Encrypted(3) = Encrypted(5). While such operation does not shock anyone per se, as a matter of fact, operands 23, and result 5 are never disclosed. Boom!

The mathematics behind HE refers to the concept of homomorphism in algebra, a structure-preserving map between two algebraic structures of the same type. Basically, both encryption and decryption functions can be thought of as homomorphisms between plaintext and ciphertext spaces. This definition explains why the sum of two operands in the plaintext space is preserved in the ciphertext space too.

#privacy #encryption #data-protection #homomorphic-encryption #data analysis

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Why You Care About Homomorphic Encryption

Why You Care About Homomorphic Encryption

The hype is dead, long live the hype. After deep learning, a new entry is about ready to go on stage. The usual journalists are warming up their keyboards for blogs, news feeds, tweets, in one word, hype. This time it’s all about privacy and data confidentiality. The new words, homomorphic encryption.

For the record, I am not personally against such a technology — quite the opposite I think it is very powerful and clever, rather against the misleading claims that usually make more followers than the technology itself. The purpose of this post is to shed light on homomorphic encryption, its benefits, and limitations, being as impartial as possible.

What is Homomorphic Encryption?

Homomorphic encryption (HE) is an encryption scheme that allows one to compute something like Encrypted(2) + Encrypted(3) = Encrypted(5). While such operation does not shock anyone per se, as a matter of fact, operands 23, and result 5 are never disclosed. Boom!

The mathematics behind HE refers to the concept of homomorphism in algebra, a structure-preserving map between two algebraic structures of the same type. Basically, both encryption and decryption functions can be thought of as homomorphisms between plaintext and ciphertext spaces. This definition explains why the sum of two operands in the plaintext space is preserved in the ciphertext space too.

#privacy #encryption #data-protection #homomorphic-encryption #data analysis

Grace  Lesch

Grace Lesch

1622713333

Homomorphic Encryption: Introduction And Use Cases

Homomorphic Encryption makes it possible to do computation while the data remains encrypted. This will ensure the data remains confidential while it is under process, which provides CSPs and other untrusted environments to accomplish their goals. At the same time, we retain the confidentiality of the data.

Like other [asymmetric encryptions], homomorphic encryption is encrypted using a public key and can only be decrypted by the respective private key. But while the data is encrypted, operations can be performed on the data, which retains confidentiality, and helps organizations achieve compliance even when using untrusted environments.

#database #encrypt #homomorphic encryption

S TV

1608438459

Machine Learning with Encrypted Data | Homomorphic Encryption

The world is changing and privacy is becoming a huge concern. The area of machine learning on encrypted data is booming and expected to grow significantly over the next 5 years. If you want to stay ahead of the curve then get educated. Here is a video to get you started

Check it out: https://youtu.be/nlsd2LO-S50

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/satsifaction

#machine-learning #encryption #python #homomorphic #data

Trystan  Doyle

Trystan Doyle

1598640120

Symmetric and Asymmetric Encryption in .NET Core

This post looks at symmetric and asymmetric encryption and how this could be implemented in .NET Core. Symmetric encryption is fast and can encrypt or decrypt large amounts of text, streams or file

#.net #.net core #asp.net core #asymmetric encryption #encryption #symmetric encryption

Zoom Rolls Out End-to-End Encryption After Setbacks

Video-conferencing giant Zoom is rolling out a technical preview of its end-to-end encryption (E2EE) next week.

Zoom has faced various controversies around its encryption policies over the past year, including several lawsuits alleging that the company falsely told users that it offers full encryption. Then, the platform came under fire in May when it announced that it would indeed offer E2EE — but to paid users only. The company later backtracked after backlash from privacy advocates, who argued that security measures should be available to all. Zoom will now offer the feature to free/”Basic” users.

The first phase of the E2EE rollout aims to solicit feedback when it comes to its policies. Users will be able to weigh in during the first 30 days. Of note, users will need to turn on the feature manually (see below for details).

“We’re pleased to roll out Phase 1 of 4 of our E2EE offering, which provides robust protections to help prevent the interception of decryption keys that could be used to monitor meeting content,” said Max Krohn, head of security engineering with Zoom, in a Wednesday post.

End-To-End Encryption Errors

The topic of encryption is critical for Zoom as it ramps up its security and privacy measures – particularly after various security flaws and privacy issues exposed weaknesses in the online meeting platform, as its user base spiked during the coronavirus pandemic.

Zoom previously said that it offered E2EE, but that marketing claim came into question after a March report from The Intercept said that Zoom’s platform actually uses transport layer security (TLS) encryption, providing only encryption between individual users and service providers, instead of directly between the users of a system.

While “encryption” means that in-transit messages are encrypted, true E2EE occurs when the message is encrypted at the source user’s device, stays encrypted while its routed through servers, and then is decrypted only at the destination user’s device.

On the heels of this backlash, Zoom in May acquired a small startup called Keybase, with the aim of providing more robust encryption for Zoom calls.

In the case of next week’s rollout, Zoom’s E2EE offering will use public-key cryptography, meaning that the keys for each Zoom meeting are generated by participants’ machines (as opposed to Zoom’s servers).

#cloud security #vulnerabilities #web security #coronavirus #covid-19 #e2ee #encryption #end to end encryption #pandemic #remote work #security #transport layer security encryption #video conferencing security #zoom #zoom meeting #zoom-bombing