How to Install Yarn on CentOS 8

How to Install Yarn on CentOS 8

This Yarn tutorial will guide you through the installation of Yarn on CentOS 8. We will also cover the basics of how to use Yarn to create a new project and add/remove dependencies. Yarn is a JavaScript package manager compatible with npm that helps you automate the process of installing, updating, configuring, and removing npm packages.

Yarn is a JavaScript package manager compatible with npm that helps you automate the process of installing, updating, configuring, and removing npm packages.

It was created to solve a set of problems with the npm, such as speeding up the packages installation process by parallelizing operations and reducing errors related to network connectivity.

This tutorial will guide you through the installation of Yarn on CentOS 8. We will also cover the basics of how to use Yarn to create a new project and add/remove dependencies.

Installing Yarn on CentOS 8

Perform the following steps as root or user with sudo privileges to install Yarn on CentOS 8:

  1. If Node.js is not installed on your system, install the Node.js package by typing:

    sudo dnf install @nodejs
    

At the time of writing, the Node.js version in the Centos8 repositories is v10.x.

  1. Enable the Yarn repository and import the repository's GPG key:

    curl --silent --location https://dl.yarnpkg.com/rpm/yarn.repo | sudo tee /etc/yum.repos.d/yarn.repo
    sudo rpm --import https://dl.yarnpkg.com/rpm/pubkey.gpg
    

The official Yarn repository is consistently maintained and provides the most up-to-date version.

  1. Once the repository is enabled, install Yarn:

    sudo dnf install yarn
    
  2. Verify the installation by printing the Yarn version number:

    yarn --version
    

At the time of writing this article, the latest version of Yarn is version 1.21.1:

```
1.21.1
```
Using Yarn

Now that you have Yarn installed on your CentOS system, we'll explore some of the most common Yarn commands.<

Creating a new project

To create a new Yarn project, use the yarn init command followed by the project name. For example, to create a project named my_project you would type:

yarn init my_project

The script will ask you several questions. You can either answer or press enter to use the default values:

yarn init v1.21.1
question name (alex): Linuxize
question version (1.0.0): 0.0.1
question description: Testing Yarn
question entry point (index.js): 
question repository url: 
question author: Linuxize
question license (MIT): 
question private: 
success Saved package.json
Done in 20.18s.

All that the command does is creating a basic package.json file containing the information you provided. This file can be modified at any time.

You can also add Yarn to and existing directory of code. To do so, navigate to the directory and execute:

yarn init my_project

Adding dependency

To add a package as a dependency to your project, use the yarn add command followed by the package name:

yarn add [package_name]

The command will install the package and any packages that it depends on and update the project's package.json and yarn.lock files.

By default, if only the package name is given, Yarn installs the latest version. To install a specific version or tag, use the following syntax:

yarn add [package_name]@[version_or_tag]

Upgrading dependency

To upgrade a package, run the yarn upgrade command followed by the package name:

yarn upgrade [package_name]

The command above updates the project dependencies to their latest version according to the version range specified in the package.json file.

You can also specify the package version or tag:

yarn upgrade [package_name]@[version_or_tag]

Removing dependency

To remove a package from the project's dependencies invoke the yarn remove command followed by the package name:

yarn remove [package_name]

This command also updates the project's package.json and yarn.lock files.

Installing all project dependencies

To install all the dependencies of an existing project that are specified in the package.json file run:

yarn

yarn install

Conclusion

We have shown you how to install yarn on your CentOS 8 machine. For more information about yarn visit the Yarn documentation page.

If you have any questions or feedback, feel free to comment below.

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Learn NPM - The Node Package Manager for JavaScript

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Why does the world need another package manager / what’s wrong with npm? JavaScript is an exemplar of a larger problem: code reuse via artifacts with dependency metadata delivered by a registry that controls namespaces and versioning. Registries are poised to provide functionality for communities: security assurances, static analysis, invariants around version availability, user support. JS is special because it has the largest registry and the most code reuse in the wild, but other communities need this too.

Docker. Rust. Ruby. Python. This is a problem that communities keep solving and re-solving. There hasn’t been a satisfactory answer to the problem of funding. Money is ultimately what supports these gossamer webs of packages. Without money, that web disintegrates. At JavaScript’s scale, the money it takes to support the web is enormous. Further, there’s value in expanding this web, and that means more language communities will contribute to this web over time, making it yet more expensive to support. We could give this web to a company with deep pockets, but we’re placing a lot of trust in an entity that’s not entirely incentivized to keep our best interests at heart.

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