Dejah  Reinger

Dejah Reinger

1603400400

A VC Explains Why VCs Are So Pissed Off Right Now

OneZero_ is partnering with Big Technology, a newsletter and podcast by Alex Kantrowitz, to bring readers exclusive access to interviews with notable figures in and around the tech industry._

This week, Kantrowitz sits down with Bloomberg Beta head Roy Bahat. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

_To subscribe to the podcast and hear the interview for yourself, _you can check it out on _Apple Podcasts**Spotify, and _Overcast.**

Venture capitalists, founders, and others in the tech industry are feeling pretty raw these days. Once admired as upstarts fighting the status quo, they now feel under siege, under attack for the negative things their products do without being appreciated for how they improve our lives.

Bloomberg Beta head Roy Bahat, a veteran venture capitalist, joins the Big Technology Podcast this week for a nuanced conversation about what’s going with the tech world, how its innovation might be linked to its problems, and how it should handle the criticism.

Kantrowitz: You’re one of the VCs out there that are very public with what you think. You tackle the important issues, not skirting around them. And I feel like you don’t yell at journalists, and that’s a good start.

Roy Bahat: I definitely do not yell at journalists. As a person who once thought I might be a journalist and failed at it, I basically think journalists are looking for the truth. If we all want to operate in this world, let’s help them find the truth and then we can figure it out. You just mentioned having the voice, a question I got asked by a founder in our portfolio, he’s like, “Why is VC Twitter so weird?”

You’re getting right into my question.

Oh, good. Then ask me questions and…

I want to hear what you got to say, and then I’ll follow.

Well, I was thinking about it. Look, venture capital is a strange business because: What do we do? People think we invest in companies. Kind of. We really sell money to companies because the companies have so much leverage when they’re doing well. And you only want to invest in great companies, so you think the ones you’re investing in are doing well. In a way, we’re all salespeople. And what do we sell?

In the language of tech, we are customer success people, meaning helping our customers, founders to succeed. And we sell money and money is a commodity, meaning like literally my product that I sell is legally equivalent — it’s tender for all debts, public, private, whatever it says on the bills. As a result, as with all commodities, the way you distinguish yourself is with your brand, reputation.

And so, VCs just have become, in a lot of cases, these flat-out braggarts who just are incredibly annoying. And I’ve tried for myself to figure out how do you highlight the things you’re proud of and the founders you’re also proud of while also having some things very difficult to have in public which is authentic, genuine engagement and it can be maddening.

One of the reasons I think people who are inauthentic in public is the fear that they could have any piece of what they say excerpted and flattened and mischaracterized and I’ve just kind of concluded that that’s going to happen sometimes and I’ll just try to be myself.

And one reason I like podcasts is — I’ve even invested in a bunch of podcast companies — is that in a podcast, it’s very hard to do that. It’s very hard to pull out that little piece and flatten you and the listeners typically paying close attention. And so that makes for a better conversation.

I like them too. I do think that you can talk with a level of nuance here that you can’t on Twitter. And one of the things that I worry about these days is that there’s a whole segment of the conversation that’s left out because any attempt to be nuanced can be rewarded with yelling. People love to yell.

You talked about the VC brand. Why do so many decide that their brand is grievance?

This is something I’ve not talked about in public before but then I’ve been thinking about, I think that it stems from an entire piece of the ideology of the technology industry because I don’t think the aggrieved thing is just VCs. I think it is founders of companies and executives and middle-level employees. I think it’s kind of endemic to the tech industry at this point. Why is that? I think it is the root cause is that a bunch of people entered tech with a certain set of beliefs about how the world works, and those beliefs don’t align with how the world works now.

And I’ll give you an example of that. I call this the Tech Paradigm. One example of that is that we in tech are the attackers. There’s this famous Steve Jobs’ line about, “It’s more fun to be a pirate than to be in the navy.” But what do you when the pirates run the most valuable companies in the world and have more power than the navy does? Well, then all of a sudden, you’re the admiral.

And so, tech does not know how to wear the crown of criticism that comes with all that responsibility. Instead, it’s like, “Well, I’m just misunderstood and if only you got it, you’d be happier with me.” Instead of saying, “Oh, shit. There actually is something valid about this. Since I have power, maybe I should show a little nuance and responsibility.” And as a result, they feel aggrieved because they’ve been attacked.

I remember there was an article that a journalist wrote about a VC fund basically saying like, “This VC fund is falling apart.” And the VC fund was led by somebody who was really sympathetic and it’s not even important who it was because this could have been many situations. It’s like it’s not about that person. And all the responses, the journalists were like, “Well, why didn’t you write about all these other things that that fund is doing that are great?” It’s like, “Well, because the point of my story was not to grade the fund overall. The point of my story was to talk about this one thing.”

#business #big-technology #venture-capital #technology #big-data

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

A VC Explains Why VCs Are So Pissed Off Right Now
Dejah  Reinger

Dejah Reinger

1603400400

A VC Explains Why VCs Are So Pissed Off Right Now

OneZero_ is partnering with Big Technology, a newsletter and podcast by Alex Kantrowitz, to bring readers exclusive access to interviews with notable figures in and around the tech industry._

This week, Kantrowitz sits down with Bloomberg Beta head Roy Bahat. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

_To subscribe to the podcast and hear the interview for yourself, _you can check it out on _Apple Podcasts**Spotify, and _Overcast.**

Venture capitalists, founders, and others in the tech industry are feeling pretty raw these days. Once admired as upstarts fighting the status quo, they now feel under siege, under attack for the negative things their products do without being appreciated for how they improve our lives.

Bloomberg Beta head Roy Bahat, a veteran venture capitalist, joins the Big Technology Podcast this week for a nuanced conversation about what’s going with the tech world, how its innovation might be linked to its problems, and how it should handle the criticism.

Kantrowitz: You’re one of the VCs out there that are very public with what you think. You tackle the important issues, not skirting around them. And I feel like you don’t yell at journalists, and that’s a good start.

Roy Bahat: I definitely do not yell at journalists. As a person who once thought I might be a journalist and failed at it, I basically think journalists are looking for the truth. If we all want to operate in this world, let’s help them find the truth and then we can figure it out. You just mentioned having the voice, a question I got asked by a founder in our portfolio, he’s like, “Why is VC Twitter so weird?”

You’re getting right into my question.

Oh, good. Then ask me questions and…

I want to hear what you got to say, and then I’ll follow.

Well, I was thinking about it. Look, venture capital is a strange business because: What do we do? People think we invest in companies. Kind of. We really sell money to companies because the companies have so much leverage when they’re doing well. And you only want to invest in great companies, so you think the ones you’re investing in are doing well. In a way, we’re all salespeople. And what do we sell?

In the language of tech, we are customer success people, meaning helping our customers, founders to succeed. And we sell money and money is a commodity, meaning like literally my product that I sell is legally equivalent — it’s tender for all debts, public, private, whatever it says on the bills. As a result, as with all commodities, the way you distinguish yourself is with your brand, reputation.

And so, VCs just have become, in a lot of cases, these flat-out braggarts who just are incredibly annoying. And I’ve tried for myself to figure out how do you highlight the things you’re proud of and the founders you’re also proud of while also having some things very difficult to have in public which is authentic, genuine engagement and it can be maddening.

One of the reasons I think people who are inauthentic in public is the fear that they could have any piece of what they say excerpted and flattened and mischaracterized and I’ve just kind of concluded that that’s going to happen sometimes and I’ll just try to be myself.

And one reason I like podcasts is — I’ve even invested in a bunch of podcast companies — is that in a podcast, it’s very hard to do that. It’s very hard to pull out that little piece and flatten you and the listeners typically paying close attention. And so that makes for a better conversation.

I like them too. I do think that you can talk with a level of nuance here that you can’t on Twitter. And one of the things that I worry about these days is that there’s a whole segment of the conversation that’s left out because any attempt to be nuanced can be rewarded with yelling. People love to yell.

You talked about the VC brand. Why do so many decide that their brand is grievance?

This is something I’ve not talked about in public before but then I’ve been thinking about, I think that it stems from an entire piece of the ideology of the technology industry because I don’t think the aggrieved thing is just VCs. I think it is founders of companies and executives and middle-level employees. I think it’s kind of endemic to the tech industry at this point. Why is that? I think it is the root cause is that a bunch of people entered tech with a certain set of beliefs about how the world works, and those beliefs don’t align with how the world works now.

And I’ll give you an example of that. I call this the Tech Paradigm. One example of that is that we in tech are the attackers. There’s this famous Steve Jobs’ line about, “It’s more fun to be a pirate than to be in the navy.” But what do you when the pirates run the most valuable companies in the world and have more power than the navy does? Well, then all of a sudden, you’re the admiral.

And so, tech does not know how to wear the crown of criticism that comes with all that responsibility. Instead, it’s like, “Well, I’m just misunderstood and if only you got it, you’d be happier with me.” Instead of saying, “Oh, shit. There actually is something valid about this. Since I have power, maybe I should show a little nuance and responsibility.” And as a result, they feel aggrieved because they’ve been attacked.

I remember there was an article that a journalist wrote about a VC fund basically saying like, “This VC fund is falling apart.” And the VC fund was led by somebody who was really sympathetic and it’s not even important who it was because this could have been many situations. It’s like it’s not about that person. And all the responses, the journalists were like, “Well, why didn’t you write about all these other things that that fund is doing that are great?” It’s like, “Well, because the point of my story was not to grade the fund overall. The point of my story was to talk about this one thing.”

#business #big-technology #venture-capital #technology #big-data

Lisa joly

Lisa joly

1623279600

2 Profitable Yield Farms You Can Get Into Right Now And Make Decent Gains Safely

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📺 The video in this post was made by Crypto expat
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1EJvvCgHUA
🔺 DISCLAIMER: The article is for information sharing. The content of this video is solely the opinions of the speaker who is not a licensed financial advisor or registered investment advisor. Not investment advice or legal advice.
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Thanks for visiting and watching! Please don’t forget to leave a like, comment and share!

#bitcoin #blockchain #yield farms #profitable yield farms you can get into right now #make decent gains safely #2 profitable yield farms you can get into right now and make decent gains safely

A Simple Flutter API to Manage Rest Api Request Easily

api_manager .A simple flutter API to manage rest api request easily with the help of flutter dio.

Get started

Install

Add dependency

dependencies:
  api_manager: $latest_version

Super simple to use

import 'package:api_manager/api_manager.dart';

void main() async {
 
  ApiResponse response = await ApiManager().request(
    requestType: RequestType.GET,
    route: "your route",
  );
  print(response);
}

Config in a base manager


class ApiRepository {
  
  static final ApiRepository _instance = ApiRepository._internal(); /// singleton api repository
  ApiManager _apiManager;

  factory ApiRepository() {
    return _instance;
  }

  /// base configuration for api manager
  ApiRepository._internal() {
    _apiManager = ApiManager();
    _apiManager.options.baseUrl = BASE_URL; /// EX: BASE_URL = https://google.com/api/v1 
    _apiManager.options.connectTimeout = 100000;
    _apiManager.options.receiveTimeout = 100000;
    _apiManager.enableLogging(responseBody: true, requestBody: false); /// enable api logging EX: response, request, headers etc
    _apiManager.enableAuthTokenCheck(() => "access_token"); /// EX: JWT/PASSPORT auth token store in cache
  }
}

Examples

Suppose we have a response model like this:

class SampleResponse{
  String name;
  int id;

  SampleResponse.fromJson(jsonMap): 
        this.name = jsonMap['name'],
        this.id = jsonMap['id'];
}

and actual api response json structure is:

{
    "data": {
        "name": "md afratul kaoser taohid",
        "id": "id"
    }
}

#Now we Performing a GET request :

 Future<ApiResponse<SampleResponse>> getRequestSample() async =>
      await _apiManager.request<SampleResponse>(
        requestType: RequestType.GET,
        route: 'api_route',
        requestParams: {"userId": 12}, /// add params if required
        isAuthRequired: true, /// by set it to true, this request add a header authorization from this method enableAuthTokenCheck();
        responseBodySerializer: (jsonMap) {
          return SampleResponse.fromJson(jsonMap); /// parse the json response into dart model class
        },
      );

#Now we Performing a POST request :

 Future<ApiResponse<SampleResponse>> postRequestSample() async =>
      await _apiManager.request<SampleResponse>(
        requestType: RequestType.POST,
        route: 'api_route',
        requestBody: {"userId": 12}, /// add POST request body
        isAuthRequired: true, /// by set it to true, this request add a header authorization from this method enableAuthTokenCheck();
        responseBodySerializer: (jsonMap) {
          return SampleResponse.fromJson(jsonMap); /// parse the json response into dart model class
        },
      );

#Now er performing a multipart file upload request :

  Future<ApiResponse<void>> updateProfilePicture(
    String filePath,
  ) async {
    MultipartFile multipartFile =
        await _apiManager.getMultipartFileData(filePath);
    FormData formData = FormData.fromMap({'picture': multipartFile});

    return await _apiManager.request(
      requestType: RequestType.POST,
      isAuthRequired: true,
      requestBody: formData,
      route: 'api_route',
    );
  }

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add api_manager

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):


dependencies:
  api_manager: ^0.1.29

Alternatively, your editor might support flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:api_manager/api_manager.dart';

example/example.dart

//void main() async {
//  ApiManager _apiManager = ApiManager();
//  _apiManager.options.baseUrl = $base_url;
//  _apiManager.responseBodyWrapper("data");
//
//  ApiResponse<List<dynamic>> response = await _apiManager.request(
//    requestType: RequestType.GET,
//    route: $route,
//    responseBodySerializer: (jsonMap) {
//      return jsonMap as List;
//    },
//  );
//  print(response);
//} 

Download Details:

Author: afratul-taohid

Source Code: https://github.com/afratul-taohid/api_manager

#flutter  #restapi 

En Momin

En Momin

1655027473

A Simple Flutter API to Manage Rest Api Request Easily

api_manager .A simple flutter API to manage rest api request easily with the help of flutter dio.

Get started

Install

Add dependency

dependencies:
  api_manager: $latest_version

Super simple to use

import 'package:api_manager/api_manager.dart';

void main() async {
 
  ApiResponse response = await ApiManager().request(
    requestType: RequestType.GET,
    route: "your route",
  );
  print(response);
}

Config in a base manager


class ApiRepository {
  
  static final ApiRepository _instance = ApiRepository._internal(); /// singleton api repository
  ApiManager _apiManager;

  factory ApiRepository() {
    return _instance;
  }

  /// base configuration for api manager
  ApiRepository._internal() {
    _apiManager = ApiManager();
    _apiManager.options.baseUrl = BASE_URL; /// EX: BASE_URL = https://google.com/api/v1 
    _apiManager.options.connectTimeout = 100000;
    _apiManager.options.receiveTimeout = 100000;
    _apiManager.enableLogging(responseBody: true, requestBody: false); /// enable api logging EX: response, request, headers etc
    _apiManager.enableAuthTokenCheck(() => "access_token"); /// EX: JWT/PASSPORT auth token store in cache
  }
}

Examples

Suppose we have a response model like this:

class SampleResponse{
  String name;
  int id;

  SampleResponse.fromJson(jsonMap): 
        this.name = jsonMap['name'],
        this.id = jsonMap['id'];
}

and actual api response json structure is:

{
    "data": {
        "name": "md afratul kaoser taohid",
        "id": "id"
    }
}

#Now we Performing a GET request :

 Future<ApiResponse<SampleResponse>> getRequestSample() async =>
      await _apiManager.request<SampleResponse>(
        requestType: RequestType.GET,
        route: 'api_route',
        requestParams: {"userId": 12}, /// add params if required
        isAuthRequired: true, /// by set it to true, this request add a header authorization from this method enableAuthTokenCheck();
        responseBodySerializer: (jsonMap) {
          return SampleResponse.fromJson(jsonMap); /// parse the json response into dart model class
        },
      );

#Now we Performing a POST request :

 Future<ApiResponse<SampleResponse>> postRequestSample() async =>
      await _apiManager.request<SampleResponse>(
        requestType: RequestType.POST,
        route: 'api_route',
        requestBody: {"userId": 12}, /// add POST request body
        isAuthRequired: true, /// by set it to true, this request add a header authorization from this method enableAuthTokenCheck();
        responseBodySerializer: (jsonMap) {
          return SampleResponse.fromJson(jsonMap); /// parse the json response into dart model class
        },
      );

#Now er performing a multipart file upload request :

  Future<ApiResponse<void>> updateProfilePicture(
    String filePath,
  ) async {
    MultipartFile multipartFile =
        await _apiManager.getMultipartFileData(filePath);
    FormData formData = FormData.fromMap({'picture': multipartFile});

    return await _apiManager.request(
      requestType: RequestType.POST,
      isAuthRequired: true,
      requestBody: formData,
      route: 'api_route',
    );
  }

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add api_manager

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):


dependencies:
  api_manager: ^0.1.29

Alternatively, your editor might support flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:api_manager/api_manager.dart';

example/example.dart

//void main() async {
//  ApiManager _apiManager = ApiManager();
//  _apiManager.options.baseUrl = $base_url;
//  _apiManager.responseBodyWrapper("data");
//
//  ApiResponse<List<dynamic>> response = await _apiManager.request(
//    requestType: RequestType.GET,
//    route: $route,
//    responseBodySerializer: (jsonMap) {
//      return jsonMap as List;
//    },
//  );
//  print(response);
//} 

GitHub :

https://github.com/fdmominbd

#flutter  #restapi 

Riley Lambert

Riley Lambert

1650856507

SQL For Data Science | Learn SQL Database For Data Science

Introduction

Data Science is a most emerging field with numerous job opportunities. We all must have been heard about the topmost Data Science skills. To start with, the easiest, as well as an essential skill that every data science aspirant should acquire, is SQL.

Nowadays, most companies are going towards being data-driven. These data are stored in a database and are managed and processed through a Database Management system. DBMS makes our work so easy and organized. Hence, it is essential to integrate the most popular programming language with the incredible DBMS tool.

SQL is the most widely used programming language while working with databases and supported by various relational database systems, like MySQL, SQL Server, and Oracle. However, the SQL standard has some features that are implemented differently in different database systems. Thus, SQL becomes one of the most important concepts to be learned in this field of Data Science.

data science skills

Image source: KDnuggets

Need of SQL in Data Science

SQL (Structured Query Language) is used for performing various operations on the data stored in the databases like updating records, deleting records, creating and modifying tables, views, etc. SQL is also the standard for the current big data platforms that use SQL as their key API for their relational databases.

Data Science is the all-around study of data. To work with data, we need to extract it from the database. This is where SQL comes into the picture. Relational Database Management is a crucial part of Data Science. A Data Scientist can control, define, manipulate, create, and query the database using SQL commands.

Many modern industries have equipped their products data management with NoSQL technology but, SQL remains the ideal choice for many business intelligence tools and in-office operations.

Many of the Database platforms are modeled after SQL. This is why it has become a standard for many database systems. Modern big data systems like Hadoop, Spark also make use of SQL only for maintaining the relational database systems and processing structured data.

We can say that:

1. A Data Scientist needs SQL to handle structured data. As the structured data is stored in relational databases. Therefore, to query these databases, a data scientist must have a good knowledge of SQL commands.

2.Big Data Platforms like Hadoop and Spark provide an extension for querying using SQL commands for manipulating.

3.SQL is the standard tool to experiment with data through the creation of test environments.

4. To perform analytics operations with the data that is stored in relational databases like Oracle, Microsoft SQL, MySQL, we need SQL.

5. SQL is also an essential tool for data wrangling and preparation. Therefore, while dealing with various Big Data tools, we make use of SQL.

Key elements of SQL for Data Science

Following are the key aspects of SQL which are most useful for Data Science. Every aspiring Data Scientists must know these necessary SQL skills and features.

sql for data science

Introduction to SQL with Python

As we all know that SQL is the most used Database Management Tool and Python is the most popular Data Science Language for its flexibility and wide range of libraries. There are various ways to use SQL with Python. Python provides multiple libraries that are developed and can utilize for this purpose. SQLite, PostgreSQL, and MySQL are examples of these libraries.

Why use SQL with Python

There are many use cases for when Data Scientists want to connect Python to SQL. Data Scientists need to connect a SQL database so that data coming from the web application can be stored. It also helps to communicate between different data sources.

There is no need to switch between different programming languages for data management. It makes Data scientists’ work more convenient. They will be able to use your Python skills to manipulate data stored in a SQL database. They don’t need a CSV file.

MySQL with Python

MySQL is a server-based database management system. One MySQL server can have multiple databases. A MySQL database consist two-step process for creating a database:

1. Make a connection to a MySQL server.

2. Execute separate queries to create the database and process data.

Let’s get started with MySQL with python

First, we will create a connection between the MySQL server and MySQL DB. For this, we will define a function that will establish a connection to the MySQL database server and will return the connection object:

!pip install mysql-connector-python
import mysql.connector
from mysql.connector import Error
def create_connection(host_name, user_name, user_password):
     connection = None
      try:
          connection = mysql.connector.connect(
                 host=host_name,
                 user=user_name,
                 passwd=user_password
            )
            print("Connection to MySQL DB successful")
      except Error as e:
            print(f"The error '{e}' occurred")
       return connection
connection = create_connection("localhost", "root", "")

In the above code, we have defined a function create_connection() that accepts following three parameters:

1. host_name

2. user_name

3. user_password

The mysql.connector is a Python SQL module that contains a method .connect() that is used to connect to a MySQL database server. When the connection is established, the connection object created will be returned to the calling function.

So far the connection is established successfully, now let’s create a database.

#we have created a function to create database that contions two parameters
#connection and query
def create_database(connection, query): #now we are creating an object cursor to execute SQL queries cursor = connection.cursor() try: #query to be executed will be passed in cursor.execute() in string form cursor.execute(query) print("Database created successfully") except Error as e: print(f"The error '{e}' occurred")
#now we are creating a database named example_app
create_database_query = "CREATE DATABASE example_app" create_database(connection, create_database_query)
#now will create database example_app on database server
#and also cretae connection between database and server
def create_connection(host_name, user_name, user_password, db_name): connection = None try: connection = mysql.connector.connect( host=host_name, user=user_name, passwd=user_password, database=db_name ) print("Connection to MySQL DB successful") except Error as e: print(f"The error '{e}' occurred") return connection
#calling the create_connection() and connects to the example_app database. connection = create_connection("localhost", "root", "", "example_app")

SQLite

SQLite is probably the most uncomplicated database we can connect to a Python application since it’s a built-in module we don’t need to install any external Python SQL modules. By default, Python installation contains a Python SQL library named sqlite3 that can be used to interact with an SQLite database.

SQLite is a serverless database. It reads and writes data to a file. That means we don’t even need to install and run an SQLite server to perform database operations like MySQL and PostgreSQL!

Let’s use sqlite3 to connect to an SQLite database in Python:

import sqlite3 from sqlite3 import Error
def create_connection(path): connection = None try: connection = sqlite3.connect(path) print("Connection to SQLite DB successful")
except Error as e: print(f"The error '{e}' occurred") return connection

In the above code, we have imported sqlite3 and the module’s Error class. Then define a function called .create_connection() that will accept the path to the SQLite database. Then .connect() from the sqlite3 module will take the SQLite database path as a parameter. If the database exists at the path specified in .connect, then a connection to the database will be established. Otherwise, a new database is created at the specified path, and then a connection is established.

sqlite3.connect(path) will return a connection object, which was also returned by create_connection(). This connection object will be used to execute SQL queries on an SQLite database. The following line of code will create a connection to the SQLite database:

connection = create_connection("E:\example_app.sqlite")

Once the connection is established we can see the database file is created in the root directory and if we want, we can also change the location of the file.

In this article, we discuss how SQL is essential for Data Science and also how we can work with SQL using python. Thanks for reading. Do let me know your comments and feedback in the comment section.

#sql #datascience #database #programming #developer