Dejah  Reinger

Dejah Reinger

1603400400

A VC Explains Why VCs Are So Pissed Off Right Now

OneZero_ is partnering with Big Technology, a newsletter and podcast by Alex Kantrowitz, to bring readers exclusive access to interviews with notable figures in and around the tech industry._

This week, Kantrowitz sits down with Bloomberg Beta head Roy Bahat. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

_To subscribe to the podcast and hear the interview for yourself, _you can check it out on _Apple Podcasts**Spotify, and _Overcast.**

Venture capitalists, founders, and others in the tech industry are feeling pretty raw these days. Once admired as upstarts fighting the status quo, they now feel under siege, under attack for the negative things their products do without being appreciated for how they improve our lives.

Bloomberg Beta head Roy Bahat, a veteran venture capitalist, joins the Big Technology Podcast this week for a nuanced conversation about what’s going with the tech world, how its innovation might be linked to its problems, and how it should handle the criticism.

Kantrowitz: You’re one of the VCs out there that are very public with what you think. You tackle the important issues, not skirting around them. And I feel like you don’t yell at journalists, and that’s a good start.

Roy Bahat: I definitely do not yell at journalists. As a person who once thought I might be a journalist and failed at it, I basically think journalists are looking for the truth. If we all want to operate in this world, let’s help them find the truth and then we can figure it out. You just mentioned having the voice, a question I got asked by a founder in our portfolio, he’s like, “Why is VC Twitter so weird?”

You’re getting right into my question.

Oh, good. Then ask me questions and…

I want to hear what you got to say, and then I’ll follow.

Well, I was thinking about it. Look, venture capital is a strange business because: What do we do? People think we invest in companies. Kind of. We really sell money to companies because the companies have so much leverage when they’re doing well. And you only want to invest in great companies, so you think the ones you’re investing in are doing well. In a way, we’re all salespeople. And what do we sell?

In the language of tech, we are customer success people, meaning helping our customers, founders to succeed. And we sell money and money is a commodity, meaning like literally my product that I sell is legally equivalent — it’s tender for all debts, public, private, whatever it says on the bills. As a result, as with all commodities, the way you distinguish yourself is with your brand, reputation.

And so, VCs just have become, in a lot of cases, these flat-out braggarts who just are incredibly annoying. And I’ve tried for myself to figure out how do you highlight the things you’re proud of and the founders you’re also proud of while also having some things very difficult to have in public which is authentic, genuine engagement and it can be maddening.

One of the reasons I think people who are inauthentic in public is the fear that they could have any piece of what they say excerpted and flattened and mischaracterized and I’ve just kind of concluded that that’s going to happen sometimes and I’ll just try to be myself.

And one reason I like podcasts is — I’ve even invested in a bunch of podcast companies — is that in a podcast, it’s very hard to do that. It’s very hard to pull out that little piece and flatten you and the listeners typically paying close attention. And so that makes for a better conversation.

I like them too. I do think that you can talk with a level of nuance here that you can’t on Twitter. And one of the things that I worry about these days is that there’s a whole segment of the conversation that’s left out because any attempt to be nuanced can be rewarded with yelling. People love to yell.

You talked about the VC brand. Why do so many decide that their brand is grievance?

This is something I’ve not talked about in public before but then I’ve been thinking about, I think that it stems from an entire piece of the ideology of the technology industry because I don’t think the aggrieved thing is just VCs. I think it is founders of companies and executives and middle-level employees. I think it’s kind of endemic to the tech industry at this point. Why is that? I think it is the root cause is that a bunch of people entered tech with a certain set of beliefs about how the world works, and those beliefs don’t align with how the world works now.

And I’ll give you an example of that. I call this the Tech Paradigm. One example of that is that we in tech are the attackers. There’s this famous Steve Jobs’ line about, “It’s more fun to be a pirate than to be in the navy.” But what do you when the pirates run the most valuable companies in the world and have more power than the navy does? Well, then all of a sudden, you’re the admiral.

And so, tech does not know how to wear the crown of criticism that comes with all that responsibility. Instead, it’s like, “Well, I’m just misunderstood and if only you got it, you’d be happier with me.” Instead of saying, “Oh, shit. There actually is something valid about this. Since I have power, maybe I should show a little nuance and responsibility.” And as a result, they feel aggrieved because they’ve been attacked.

I remember there was an article that a journalist wrote about a VC fund basically saying like, “This VC fund is falling apart.” And the VC fund was led by somebody who was really sympathetic and it’s not even important who it was because this could have been many situations. It’s like it’s not about that person. And all the responses, the journalists were like, “Well, why didn’t you write about all these other things that that fund is doing that are great?” It’s like, “Well, because the point of my story was not to grade the fund overall. The point of my story was to talk about this one thing.”

#business #big-technology #venture-capital #technology #big-data

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

A VC Explains Why VCs Are So Pissed Off Right Now
Dejah  Reinger

Dejah Reinger

1603400400

A VC Explains Why VCs Are So Pissed Off Right Now

OneZero_ is partnering with Big Technology, a newsletter and podcast by Alex Kantrowitz, to bring readers exclusive access to interviews with notable figures in and around the tech industry._

This week, Kantrowitz sits down with Bloomberg Beta head Roy Bahat. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

_To subscribe to the podcast and hear the interview for yourself, _you can check it out on _Apple Podcasts**Spotify, and _Overcast.**

Venture capitalists, founders, and others in the tech industry are feeling pretty raw these days. Once admired as upstarts fighting the status quo, they now feel under siege, under attack for the negative things their products do without being appreciated for how they improve our lives.

Bloomberg Beta head Roy Bahat, a veteran venture capitalist, joins the Big Technology Podcast this week for a nuanced conversation about what’s going with the tech world, how its innovation might be linked to its problems, and how it should handle the criticism.

Kantrowitz: You’re one of the VCs out there that are very public with what you think. You tackle the important issues, not skirting around them. And I feel like you don’t yell at journalists, and that’s a good start.

Roy Bahat: I definitely do not yell at journalists. As a person who once thought I might be a journalist and failed at it, I basically think journalists are looking for the truth. If we all want to operate in this world, let’s help them find the truth and then we can figure it out. You just mentioned having the voice, a question I got asked by a founder in our portfolio, he’s like, “Why is VC Twitter so weird?”

You’re getting right into my question.

Oh, good. Then ask me questions and…

I want to hear what you got to say, and then I’ll follow.

Well, I was thinking about it. Look, venture capital is a strange business because: What do we do? People think we invest in companies. Kind of. We really sell money to companies because the companies have so much leverage when they’re doing well. And you only want to invest in great companies, so you think the ones you’re investing in are doing well. In a way, we’re all salespeople. And what do we sell?

In the language of tech, we are customer success people, meaning helping our customers, founders to succeed. And we sell money and money is a commodity, meaning like literally my product that I sell is legally equivalent — it’s tender for all debts, public, private, whatever it says on the bills. As a result, as with all commodities, the way you distinguish yourself is with your brand, reputation.

And so, VCs just have become, in a lot of cases, these flat-out braggarts who just are incredibly annoying. And I’ve tried for myself to figure out how do you highlight the things you’re proud of and the founders you’re also proud of while also having some things very difficult to have in public which is authentic, genuine engagement and it can be maddening.

One of the reasons I think people who are inauthentic in public is the fear that they could have any piece of what they say excerpted and flattened and mischaracterized and I’ve just kind of concluded that that’s going to happen sometimes and I’ll just try to be myself.

And one reason I like podcasts is — I’ve even invested in a bunch of podcast companies — is that in a podcast, it’s very hard to do that. It’s very hard to pull out that little piece and flatten you and the listeners typically paying close attention. And so that makes for a better conversation.

I like them too. I do think that you can talk with a level of nuance here that you can’t on Twitter. And one of the things that I worry about these days is that there’s a whole segment of the conversation that’s left out because any attempt to be nuanced can be rewarded with yelling. People love to yell.

You talked about the VC brand. Why do so many decide that their brand is grievance?

This is something I’ve not talked about in public before but then I’ve been thinking about, I think that it stems from an entire piece of the ideology of the technology industry because I don’t think the aggrieved thing is just VCs. I think it is founders of companies and executives and middle-level employees. I think it’s kind of endemic to the tech industry at this point. Why is that? I think it is the root cause is that a bunch of people entered tech with a certain set of beliefs about how the world works, and those beliefs don’t align with how the world works now.

And I’ll give you an example of that. I call this the Tech Paradigm. One example of that is that we in tech are the attackers. There’s this famous Steve Jobs’ line about, “It’s more fun to be a pirate than to be in the navy.” But what do you when the pirates run the most valuable companies in the world and have more power than the navy does? Well, then all of a sudden, you’re the admiral.

And so, tech does not know how to wear the crown of criticism that comes with all that responsibility. Instead, it’s like, “Well, I’m just misunderstood and if only you got it, you’d be happier with me.” Instead of saying, “Oh, shit. There actually is something valid about this. Since I have power, maybe I should show a little nuance and responsibility.” And as a result, they feel aggrieved because they’ve been attacked.

I remember there was an article that a journalist wrote about a VC fund basically saying like, “This VC fund is falling apart.” And the VC fund was led by somebody who was really sympathetic and it’s not even important who it was because this could have been many situations. It’s like it’s not about that person. And all the responses, the journalists were like, “Well, why didn’t you write about all these other things that that fund is doing that are great?” It’s like, “Well, because the point of my story was not to grade the fund overall. The point of my story was to talk about this one thing.”

#business #big-technology #venture-capital #technology #big-data

Lisa joly

Lisa joly

1623279600

2 Profitable Yield Farms You Can Get Into Right Now And Make Decent Gains Safely

hey guys in this video I am going to talk about 2 yield farms you can do right now and make some good gains but relatively safe. The first one is Bunny on PCB you earn WBNB and the second is on Valuedefi you stake vBSWAP + BUSD with a 98/2 split and you earn more WBNB + BUSD + your share in the vBSWAP profit pool. This is something new they implements and IMO it’s causing the price of vBSWAP to go up.
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The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1EJvvCgHUA
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Thanks for visiting and watching! Please don’t forget to leave a like, comment and share!

#bitcoin #blockchain #yield farms #profitable yield farms you can get into right now #make decent gains safely #2 profitable yield farms you can get into right now and make decent gains safely

A Simple Flutter API to Manage Rest Api Request Easily

api_manager .A simple flutter API to manage rest api request easily with the help of flutter dio.

Get started

Install

Add dependency

dependencies:
  api_manager: $latest_version

Super simple to use

import 'package:api_manager/api_manager.dart';

void main() async {
 
  ApiResponse response = await ApiManager().request(
    requestType: RequestType.GET,
    route: "your route",
  );
  print(response);
}

Config in a base manager


class ApiRepository {
  
  static final ApiRepository _instance = ApiRepository._internal(); /// singleton api repository
  ApiManager _apiManager;

  factory ApiRepository() {
    return _instance;
  }

  /// base configuration for api manager
  ApiRepository._internal() {
    _apiManager = ApiManager();
    _apiManager.options.baseUrl = BASE_URL; /// EX: BASE_URL = https://google.com/api/v1 
    _apiManager.options.connectTimeout = 100000;
    _apiManager.options.receiveTimeout = 100000;
    _apiManager.enableLogging(responseBody: true, requestBody: false); /// enable api logging EX: response, request, headers etc
    _apiManager.enableAuthTokenCheck(() => "access_token"); /// EX: JWT/PASSPORT auth token store in cache
  }
}

Examples

Suppose we have a response model like this:

class SampleResponse{
  String name;
  int id;

  SampleResponse.fromJson(jsonMap): 
        this.name = jsonMap['name'],
        this.id = jsonMap['id'];
}

and actual api response json structure is:

{
    "data": {
        "name": "md afratul kaoser taohid",
        "id": "id"
    }
}

#Now we Performing a GET request :

 Future<ApiResponse<SampleResponse>> getRequestSample() async =>
      await _apiManager.request<SampleResponse>(
        requestType: RequestType.GET,
        route: 'api_route',
        requestParams: {"userId": 12}, /// add params if required
        isAuthRequired: true, /// by set it to true, this request add a header authorization from this method enableAuthTokenCheck();
        responseBodySerializer: (jsonMap) {
          return SampleResponse.fromJson(jsonMap); /// parse the json response into dart model class
        },
      );

#Now we Performing a POST request :

 Future<ApiResponse<SampleResponse>> postRequestSample() async =>
      await _apiManager.request<SampleResponse>(
        requestType: RequestType.POST,
        route: 'api_route',
        requestBody: {"userId": 12}, /// add POST request body
        isAuthRequired: true, /// by set it to true, this request add a header authorization from this method enableAuthTokenCheck();
        responseBodySerializer: (jsonMap) {
          return SampleResponse.fromJson(jsonMap); /// parse the json response into dart model class
        },
      );

#Now er performing a multipart file upload request :

  Future<ApiResponse<void>> updateProfilePicture(
    String filePath,
  ) async {
    MultipartFile multipartFile =
        await _apiManager.getMultipartFileData(filePath);
    FormData formData = FormData.fromMap({'picture': multipartFile});

    return await _apiManager.request(
      requestType: RequestType.POST,
      isAuthRequired: true,
      requestBody: formData,
      route: 'api_route',
    );
  }

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add api_manager

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):


dependencies:
  api_manager: ^0.1.29

Alternatively, your editor might support flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:api_manager/api_manager.dart';

example/example.dart

//void main() async {
//  ApiManager _apiManager = ApiManager();
//  _apiManager.options.baseUrl = $base_url;
//  _apiManager.responseBodyWrapper("data");
//
//  ApiResponse<List<dynamic>> response = await _apiManager.request(
//    requestType: RequestType.GET,
//    route: $route,
//    responseBodySerializer: (jsonMap) {
//      return jsonMap as List;
//    },
//  );
//  print(response);
//} 

Download Details:

Author: afratul-taohid

Source Code: https://github.com/afratul-taohid/api_manager

#flutter  #restapi 

Shawn  Durgan

Shawn Durgan

1603029420

Recognizing the Internet as a Basic Human Right

Network Neutrality, which literally protects freedom of speech, has become a controversial concept in the U.S.

The Internet is an essential commodity in contemporary life. No one disagrees. However, not everyone agrees on the relevance of network neutrality.

Net neutrality was founded on the idea that the Internet is open to all, with all websites treated equally, whatever the platform used to access them.

It upholds the idea that Internet Service Providers (ISPs) like Verizon and Comcast should not transfer selected data into “fast lanes” so users can access them faster, and, on the other hand, block or discriminate against other content to slow them down, so users cannot access them easily.

The idea upheld is also to provide this service like a utility, and prevent discrimination in delivering its service; a city’s water supply is a utility service that affords the same water pressure to all, considering as immaterial, user identity or reason for consumption.

In other words, an ISP should not be allowed to make a huge global corporation’s website faster than a small business website. The inventor of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee, himself, says,

“It’s time to recognize the internet as a basic human right. It means guaranteeing affordable access for all, ensuring internet packets are delivered without commercial or political discrimination, and protecting the privacy and freedom of web users regardless of where they live.”

In fact, the United Nations Human Rights Council, in 2012, determined that connecting to the internet is a human right. The UN Resolution condemned all attempts to block free speech online, and stated in conclusion, that “the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online, in particular, freedom of expression.” The resolution was updated and unanimously re-adopted twice, in 2014 and in 2016.

This principle of being fair to all content and websites, took on enhanced significance during the global stay-at-home orders and consequently extensive remote work situations.

#internet #freedom #rights #internet-as-a-right #universal-rights #good-company #latest-tech-stories #net-neutrality

Explaining the Explainable AI: A 2-Stage Approach

As artificial intelligence (AI) models, especially those using deep learning, have gained prominence over the last eight or so years [8], they are now significantly impacting society, ranging from loan decisions to self-driving cars. Inherently though, a majority of these models are opaque, and hence following their recommendations blindly in human critical applications can raise issues such as fairness, safety, reliability, along with many others. This has led to the emergence of a subfield in AI called explainable AI (XAI) [7]. XAI is primarily concerned with understanding or interpreting the decisions made by these opaque or black-box models so that one can appropriate trust, and in some cases, have even better performance through human-machine collaboration [5].

While there are multiple views on what XAI is [12] and how explainability can be formalized [4, 6], it is still unclear as to what XAI truly is and why it is hard to formalize mathematically. The reason for this lack of clarity is that not only must the model and/or data be considered but also the final consumer of the explanation. Most XAI methods [11, 9, 3], given this intermingled view, try to meet all these requirements at the same time. For example, many methods try to identify a sparse set of features that replicate the decision of the model. The sparsity is a proxy for the consumer’s mental model. An important question asks whether we can disentangle the steps that XAI methods are trying to accomplish? This may help us better understand the truly challenging parts as well as the simpler parts of XAI, not to mention it may motivate different types of methods.

Two-Stages of XAI

We conjecture that the XAI process can be broadly disentangled into two parts, as depicted in Figure 1. The first part is uncovering what is truly happening in the model that we want to understand, while the second part is about conveying that information to the user in a consumable way. The first part is relatively easy to formalize as it mainly deals with analyzing how well a simple proxy model might generalize either locally or globally with respect to (w.r.t.) data that is generated using the black-box model. Rather than having generalization guarantees w.r.t. the underlying distribution, we now want them w.r.t. the (conditional) output distribution of the model. Once we have some way of figuring out what is truly important, a second step is to communicate this information. This second part is much less clear as we do not have an objective way of characterizing an individual’s mind. This part, we believe, is what makes explainability as a whole so challenging to formalize. A mainstay for a lot of XAI research over the last year or so has been to conduct user studies to evaluate new XAI methods.

#overviews #ai #explainability #explainable ai #xai