Anil  Sakhiya

Anil Sakhiya

1652748716

Exploratory Data Analysis(EDA) with Python

Exploratory Data Analysis Tutorial | Basics of EDA with Python

Exploratory data analysis is used by data scientists to analyze and investigate data sets and summarize their main characteristics, often employing data visualization methods. It helps determine how best to manipulate data sources to get the answers you need, making it easier for data scientists to discover patterns, spot anomalies, test a hypothesis, or check assumptions. EDA is primarily used to see what data can reveal beyond the formal modeling or hypothesis testing task and provides a better understanding of data set variables and the relationships between them. It can also help determine if the statistical techniques you are considering for data analysis are appropriate or not.

🔹 Topics Covered:
00:00:00 Basics of EDA with Python
01:40:10 Multiple Variate Analysis
02:30:26 Outlier Detection
03:44:48 Cricket World Cup Analysis using Exploratory Data Analysis


Learning the basics of Exploratory Data Analysis using Python with Numpy, Matplotlib, and Pandas.

What is Exploratory Data Analysis(EDA)?

If we want to explain EDA in simple terms, it means trying to understand the given data much better, so that we can make some sense out of it.

We can find a more formal definition in Wikipedia.

In statistics, exploratory data analysis is an approach to analyzing data sets to summarize their main characteristics, often with visual methods. A statistical model can be used or not, but primarily EDA is for seeing what the data can tell us beyond the formal modeling or hypothesis testing task.

EDA in Python uses data visualization to draw meaningful patterns and insights. It also involves the preparation of data sets for analysis by removing irregularities in the data.

Based on the results of EDA, companies also make business decisions, which can have repercussions later.

  • If EDA is not done properly then it can hamper the further steps in the machine learning model building process.
  • If done well, it may improve the efficacy of everything we do next.

In this article we’ll see about the following topics:

  1. Data Sourcing
  2. Data Cleaning
  3. Univariate analysis
  4. Bivariate analysis
  5. Multivariate analysis

1. Data Sourcing

Data Sourcing is the process of finding and loading the data into our system. Broadly there are two ways in which we can find data.

  1. Private Data
  2. Public Data

Private Data

As the name suggests, private data is given by private organizations. There are some security and privacy concerns attached to it. This type of data is used for mainly organizations internal analysis.

Public Data

This type of Data is available to everyone. We can find this in government websites and public organizations etc. Anyone can access this data, we do not need any special permissions or approval.

We can get public data on the following sites.

The very first step of EDA is Data Sourcing, we have seen how we can access data and load into our system. Now, the next step is how to clean the data.

2. Data Cleaning

After completing the Data Sourcing, the next step in the process of EDA is Data Cleaning. It is very important to get rid of the irregularities and clean the data after sourcing it into our system.

Irregularities are of different types of data.

  • Missing Values
  • Incorrect Format
  • Incorrect Headers
  • Anomalies/Outliers

To perform the data cleaning we are using a sample data set, which can be found here.

We are using Jupyter Notebook for analysis.

First, let’s import the necessary libraries and store the data in our system for analysis.

#import the useful libraries.
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import seaborn as sns
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline

# Read the data set of "Marketing Analysis" in data.
data= pd.read_csv("marketing_analysis.csv")

# Printing the data
data

Now, the data set looks like this,

If we observe the above dataset, there are some discrepancies in the Column header for the first 2 rows. The correct data is from the index number 1. So, we have to fix the first two rows.

This is called Fixing the Rows and Columns. Let’s ignore the first two rows and load the data again.

#import the useful libraries.
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import seaborn as sns
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline

# Read the file in data without first two rows as it is of no use.
data = pd.read_csv("marketing_analysis.csv",skiprows = 2)

#print the head of the data frame.
data.head()

Now, the dataset looks like this, and it makes more sense.

Dataset after fixing the rows and columns

Following are the steps to be taken while Fixing Rows and Columns:

  1. Delete Summary Rows and Columns in the Dataset.
  2. Delete Header and Footer Rows on every page.
  3. Delete Extra Rows like blank rows, page numbers, etc.
  4. We can merge different columns if it makes for better understanding of the data
  5. Similarly, we can also split one column into multiple columns based on our requirements or understanding.
  6. Add Column names, it is very important to have column names to the dataset.

Now if we observe the above dataset, the customerid column has of no importance to our analysis, and also the jobedu column has both the information of job and education in it.

So, what we’ll do is, we’ll drop the customerid column and we’ll split the jobedu column into two other columns job and education and after that, we’ll drop the jobedu column as well.

# Drop the customer id as it is of no use.
data.drop('customerid', axis = 1, inplace = True)

#Extract job  & Education in newly from "jobedu" column.
data['job']= data["jobedu"].apply(lambda x: x.split(",")[0])
data['education']= data["jobedu"].apply(lambda x: x.split(",")[1])

# Drop the "jobedu" column from the dataframe.
data.drop('jobedu', axis = 1, inplace = True)

# Printing the Dataset
data

Now, the dataset looks like this,

Dropping Customerid and jobedu columns and adding job and education columns

Missing Values

If there are missing values in the Dataset before doing any statistical analysis, we need to handle those missing values.

There are mainly three types of missing values.

  1. MCAR(Missing completely at random): These values do not depend on any other features.
  2. MAR(Missing at random): These values may be dependent on some other features.
  3. MNAR(Missing not at random): These missing values have some reason for why they are missing.

Let’s see which columns have missing values in the dataset.

# Checking the missing values
data.isnull().sum()

The output will be,

As we can see three columns contain missing values. Let’s see how to handle the missing values. We can handle missing values by dropping the missing records or by imputing the values.

Drop the missing Values

Let’s handle missing values in the age column.

# Dropping the records with age missing in data dataframe.
data = data[~data.age.isnull()].copy()

# Checking the missing values in the dataset.
data.isnull().sum()

Let’s check the missing values in the dataset now.

Let’s impute values to the missing values for the month column.

Since the month column is of an object type, let’s calculate the mode of that column and impute those values to the missing values.

# Find the mode of month in data
month_mode = data.month.mode()[0]

# Fill the missing values with mode value of month in data.
data.month.fillna(month_mode, inplace = True)

# Let's see the null values in the month column.
data.month.isnull().sum()

Now output is,

# Mode of month is
'may, 2017'
# Null values in month column after imputing with mode
0

Handling the missing values in the Response column. Since, our target column is Response Column, if we impute the values to this column it’ll affect our analysis. So, it is better to drop the missing values from Response Column.

#drop the records with response missing in data.
data = data[~data.response.isnull()].copy()
# Calculate the missing values in each column of data frame
data.isnull().sum()

Let’s check whether the missing values in the dataset have been handled or not,

All the missing values have been handled

We can also, fill the missing values as ‘NaN’ so that while doing any statistical analysis, it won’t affect the outcome.

Handling Outliers

We have seen how to fix missing values, now let’s see how to handle outliers in the dataset.

Outliers are the values that are far beyond the next nearest data points.

There are two types of outliers:

  1. Univariate outliers: Univariate outliers are the data points whose values lie beyond the range of expected values based on one variable.
  2. Multivariate outliers: While plotting data, some values of one variable may not lie beyond the expected range, but when you plot the data with some other variable, these values may lie far from the expected value.

So, after understanding the causes of these outliers, we can handle them by dropping those records or imputing with the values or leaving them as is, if it makes more sense.

Standardizing Values

To perform data analysis on a set of values, we have to make sure the values in the same column should be on the same scale. For example, if the data contains the values of the top speed of different companies’ cars, then the whole column should be either in meters/sec scale or miles/sec scale.

Now, that we are clear on how to source and clean the data, let’s see how we can analyze the data.

3. Univariate Analysis

If we analyze data over a single variable/column from a dataset, it is known as Univariate Analysis.

Categorical Unordered Univariate Analysis:

An unordered variable is a categorical variable that has no defined order. If we take our data as an example, the job column in the dataset is divided into many sub-categories like technician, blue-collar, services, management, etc. There is no weight or measure given to any value in the ‘job’ column.

Now, let’s analyze the job category by using plots. Since Job is a category, we will plot the bar plot.

# Let's calculate the percentage of each job status category.
data.job.value_counts(normalize=True)

#plot the bar graph of percentage job categories
data.job.value_counts(normalize=True).plot.barh()
plt.show()

The output looks like this,

By the above bar plot, we can infer that the data set contains more number of blue-collar workers compared to other categories.

Categorical Ordered Univariate Analysis:

Ordered variables are those variables that have a natural rank of order. Some examples of categorical ordered variables from our dataset are:

  • Month: Jan, Feb, March……
  • Education: Primary, Secondary,……

Now, let’s analyze the Education Variable from the dataset. Since we’ve already seen a bar plot, let’s see how a Pie Chart looks like.

#calculate the percentage of each education category.
data.education.value_counts(normalize=True)

#plot the pie chart of education categories
data.education.value_counts(normalize=True).plot.pie()
plt.show()

The output will be,

By the above analysis, we can infer that the data set has a large number of them belongs to secondary education after that tertiary and next primary. Also, a very small percentage of them have been unknown.

This is how we analyze univariate categorical analysis. If the column or variable is of numerical then we’ll analyze by calculating its mean, median, std, etc. We can get those values by using the describe function.

data.salary.describe()

The output will be,

4. Bivariate Analysis

If we analyze data by taking two variables/columns into consideration from a dataset, it is known as Bivariate Analysis.

a) Numeric-Numeric Analysis:

Analyzing the two numeric variables from a dataset is known as numeric-numeric analysis. We can analyze it in three different ways.

  • Scatter Plot
  • Pair Plot
  • Correlation Matrix

Scatter Plot

Let’s take three columns ‘Balance’, ‘Age’ and ‘Salary’ from our dataset and see what we can infer by plotting to scatter plot between salary balance and age balance

#plot the scatter plot of balance and salary variable in data
plt.scatter(data.salary,data.balance)
plt.show()

#plot the scatter plot of balance and age variable in data
data.plot.scatter(x="age",y="balance")
plt.show()

Now, the scatter plots looks like,

Pair Plot

Now, let’s plot Pair Plots for the three columns we used in plotting Scatter plots. We’ll use the seaborn library for plotting Pair Plots.

#plot the pair plot of salary, balance and age in data dataframe.
sns.pairplot(data = data, vars=['salary','balance','age'])
plt.show()

The Pair Plot looks like this,

Correlation Matrix

Since we cannot use more than two variables as x-axis and y-axis in Scatter and Pair Plots, it is difficult to see the relation between three numerical variables in a single graph. In those cases, we’ll use the correlation matrix.

# Creating a matrix using age, salry, balance as rows and columns
data[['age','salary','balance']].corr()

#plot the correlation matrix of salary, balance and age in data dataframe.
sns.heatmap(data[['age','salary','balance']].corr(), annot=True, cmap = 'Reds')
plt.show()

First, we created a matrix using age, salary, and balance. After that, we are plotting the heatmap using the seaborn library of the matrix.

b) Numeric - Categorical Analysis

Analyzing the one numeric variable and one categorical variable from a dataset is known as numeric-categorical analysis. We analyze them mainly using mean, median, and box plots.

Let’s take salary and response columns from our dataset.

First check for mean value using groupby

#groupby the response to find the mean of the salary with response no & yes separately.
data.groupby('response')['salary'].mean()

The output will be,

There is not much of a difference between the yes and no response based on the salary.

Let’s calculate the median,

#groupby the response to find the median of the salary with response no & yes separately.
data.groupby('response')['salary'].median()

The output will be,

By both mean and median we can say that the response of yes and no remains the same irrespective of the person’s salary. But, is it truly behaving like that, let’s plot the box plot for them and check the behavior.

#plot the box plot of salary for yes & no responses.
sns.boxplot(data.response, data.salary)
plt.show()

The box plot looks like this,

As we can see, when we plot the Box Plot, it paints a very different picture compared to mean and median. The IQR for customers who gave a positive response is on the higher salary side.

This is how we analyze Numeric-Categorical variables, we use mean, median, and Box Plots to draw some sort of conclusions.

c) Categorical — Categorical Analysis

Since our target variable/column is the Response rate, we’ll see how the different categories like Education, Marital Status, etc., are associated with the Response column. So instead of ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ we will convert them into ‘1’ and ‘0’, by doing that we’ll get the “Response Rate”.

#create response_rate of numerical data type where response "yes"= 1, "no"= 0
data['response_rate'] = np.where(data.response=='yes',1,0)
data.response_rate.value_counts()

The output looks like this,

Let’s see how the response rate varies for different categories in marital status.

#plot the bar graph of marital status with average value of response_rate
data.groupby('marital')['response_rate'].mean().plot.bar()
plt.show()

The graph looks like this,

By the above graph, we can infer that the positive response is more for Single status members in the data set. Similarly, we can plot the graphs for Loan vs Response rate, Housing Loans vs Response rate, etc.

5. Multivariate Analysis

If we analyze data by taking more than two variables/columns into consideration from a dataset, it is known as Multivariate Analysis.

Let’s see how ‘Education’, ‘Marital’, and ‘Response_rate’ vary with each other.

First, we’ll create a pivot table with the three columns and after that, we’ll create a heatmap.

result = pd.pivot_table(data=data, index='education', columns='marital',values='response_rate')
print(result)

#create heat map of education vs marital vs response_rate
sns.heatmap(result, annot=True, cmap = 'RdYlGn', center=0.117)
plt.show()

The Pivot table and heatmap looks like this,

Based on the Heatmap we can infer that the married people with primary education are less likely to respond positively for the survey and single people with tertiary education are most likely to respond positively to the survey.

Similarly, we can plot the graphs for Job vs marital vs response, Education vs poutcome vs response, etc.

Conclusion

This is how we’ll do Exploratory Data Analysis. Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) helps us to look beyond the data. The more we explore the data, the more the insights we draw from it. As a data analyst, almost 80% of our time will be spent understanding data and solving various business problems through EDA.

Thank you for reading and Happy Coding!!!

#dataanalysis #python

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Exploratory Data Analysis(EDA) with Python
HI Python

HI Python

1621635960

Exploratory Data Analysis in Python: What You Need to Know?

Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) is a very common and important practice followed by all data scientists. It is the process of looking at tables and tables of data from different angles in order to understand it fully. Gaining a good understanding of data helps us to clean and summarize it, which then brings out the insights and trends which were otherwise unclear.

EDA has no hard-core set of rules which are to be followed like in ‘data analysis’, for example. People who are new to the field always tend to confuse between the two terms, which are mostly similar but different in their purpose. Unlike EDA, data analysis is more inclined towards the implementation of probabilities and statistical methods to reveal facts and relationships among different variants.

Coming back, there is no right or wrong way to perform EDA. It varies from person to person however, there are some major guidelines commonly followed which are listed below.

  • Handling missing values: Null values can be seen when all the data may not have been available or recorded during collection.
  • Removing duplicate data: It is important to prevent any overfitting or bias created during training the machine learning algorithm using repeated data records
  • Handling outliers: Outliers are records that drastically differ from the rest of the data and don’t follow the trend. It can arise due to certain exceptions or inaccuracy during data collection
  • Scaling and normalizing: This is only done for numerical data variables. Most of the time the variables greatly differ in their range and scale which makes it difficult to compare them and find correlations.
  • Univariate and Bivariate analysis: Univariate analysis is usually done by seeing how one variable is affecting the target variable. Bivariate analysis is carried out between any 2 variables, it can either be numerical or categorical or both.

We will look at how some of these are implemented using a very famous ‘Home Credit Default Risk’ dataset available on Kaggle here. The data contains information about the loan applicant at the time of applying for the loan. It contains two types of scenarios:

  • The client with payment difficulties: he/she had late payment more than X days

on at least one of the first Y instalments of the loan in our sample,

  • All other cases: All other cases when the payment is paid on time.

We’ll be only working on the application data files for the sake of this article.

#data science #data analysis #data analysis in python #exploratory data analysis in python

 iOS App Dev

iOS App Dev

1620466520

Your Data Architecture: Simple Best Practices for Your Data Strategy

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you should probably think about your data architecture and possible best practices.

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you most probably need to think about your data architecture and consider possible best practices. Gaining a competitive edge, remaining customer-centric to the greatest extent possible, and streamlining processes to get on-the-button outcomes can all be traced back to an organization’s capacity to build a future-ready data architecture.

In what follows, we offer a short overview of the overarching capabilities of data architecture. These include user-centricity, elasticity, robustness, and the capacity to ensure the seamless flow of data at all times. Added to these are automation enablement, plus security and data governance considerations. These points from our checklist for what we perceive to be an anticipatory analytics ecosystem.

#big data #data science #big data analytics #data analysis #data architecture #data transformation #data platform #data strategy #cloud data platform #data acquisition

Hertha  Walsh

Hertha Walsh

1603270800

Graphical Approach to Exploratory Data Analysis in Python

Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) is one of the most important aspect in every data science or data analysis problem. It provides us greater understanding on our data and can possibly unravel hidden insights that aren’t that obvious to us. The first article I’ve wrote on Medium is also on performing EDA in R, you can check it out here. This post will focus more on graphical EDA in Python using matplotlib, regression line and even motion chart!

Dataset

The dataset we are using for this article can be obtained from Gapminder, and drilling down into _Population, Gender Equality in Education _and Income.

The _Population _data contains yearly data regarding the estimated resident population, grouped by countries around the world between 1800 and 2018.

The Gender Equality in Education data contains yearly data between 1970 and 2015 on the ratio between female to male in schools, among 25 to 34 years old which includes primary, secondary and tertiary education across different countries

The _Income _data contains yearly data of income per person adjusted for differences in purchasing power (in international dollars) across different countries around the world, for the period between 1800 and 2018.

EDA on Population

Let’s first plot the population data over time, and focus mainly on the three countries Singapore, United States and China. We will use matplotlib library to plot 3 different line charts on the same figure.

import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pylab as plt
%matplotlib inline

## read in data
population = pd.read_csv('./population.csv')
## plot for the 3 countries
plt.plot(population.Year,population.Singapore,label="Singapore")
plt.plot(population.Year,population.China,label="China")
plt.plot(population.Year,population["United States"],label="United States")
## add legends, labels and title
plt.legend(loc='best')
plt.xlabel('Year')
plt.ylabel('Population')
plt.title('Population Growth over time')
plt.show()

#exploratory-data-analysis #data-analysis #data-science #data-visualization #python

Aketch  Rachel

Aketch Rachel

1625001660

Exploratory Data Analysis in Few Seconds

EDA is a way to understand what the data is all about. It is very important as it helps us to understand the outliers, relationship of features within the data with the help of graphs and plots.

EDA is a time taking process as we need to make visualizations between different features using libraries like Matplot, seaborn, etc.

There is a way to automate this process by a single line of code using the library Pandas Visual Analysis.

About Pandas Visual Analysis

  1. It is an open-source python library used for Exploratory Data Analysis.
  2. It creates an interactive user interface to visualize datasets in Jupyter Notebook.
  3. Visualizations created can be downloaded as images from the interface itself.
  4. It has a selection type that will help to visualize patterns with and without outliers.

Implementation

  1. Installation
  2. 2. Importing Dataset
  3. 3. EDA using Pandas Visual Analysis

Understanding Output

Let’s understand the different sections in the user interface :

  1. Statistical Analysis: This section will show the statistical properties like Mean, Median, Mode, and Quantiles of all numerical features.
  2. Scatter Plot-It shows the Distribution between 2 different features with the help of a scatter plot. you can choose features to be plotted on the X and Y axis from the dropdown.
  3. Histogram-It shows the distribution between 2 Different features with the help of a Histogram.

#data-analysis #machine-learning #data-visualization #data-science #data analysis #exploratory data analysis

Adrienne  Hane

Adrienne Hane

1599206903

Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) From Scratch in Python

Introduction

Exploratory data analysis is one of the best practices used in data science today. While starting a career in Data Science, people generally don’t know the difference between Data analysis and exploratory data analysis. There is not a very big difference between the two, but both have different purposes.

Exploratory Data Analysis(EDA): Exploratory data analysis is a complement to  inferential statistics, which tends to be fairly rigid with rules and formulas. At an advanced level, EDA involves looking at and describing the data set from different angles and then summarizing it.

Data Analysis: Data Analysis is the statistics and probability to figure out trends in the data set. It is used to show historical data by using some analytics tools. It helps in drilling down the information, to transform metrics, facts, and figures into initiatives for improvement.

Exploratory Data Analysis(EDA)

We will explore a Data set and perform the exploratory data analysis. The major topics to be covered are below:

— Handle Missing value
— Removing duplicates
— Outlier Treatment
— Normalizing and Scaling( Numerical Variables)
— Encoding Categorical variables( Dummy Variables)
— Bivariate Analysis

#data-analysis #statistics #exploratory-data-analysis #data-science #python