Nat  Grady

Nat Grady

1657572540

Tockler: Automatically Track Applications Usage and Working Time

Tockler

Automatically track applications usage and working time.

With Tockler you can go back in time and see what you were working on. You can get information on what apps were used - exactly at what time - and what title the application had at that moment. This is enough to determine how much you did something.

Track how you spent your time on a computer.

Tockler tracks active applications usage and computer state. It records active application titles. It tracks idle, offline, and online state. You can see this data with a nice interactive timeline chart.

Analyze your computer usage

See you total online time today, yesterday, or any other day. In monthly calendar views and with charts.

Tockler needs YOUR support. Currently, every expense is coming from my pocket. 
It would be awesome if this project would keep itself alive from donations.

 Tockler is free to download and use.

Light theme

Timeline Settings Summary Summary Search Tray window

Dark theme

Timeline Settings Summary Summary Search Tray window

Theme by StyleStack.com

Feedback

Feel free to make feature requests by creating a issue and 'Star' this project.

Made with

Logs

By default, tockler writes logs to the following locations:

Linux: ~/.config/tockler/logs/main.log

macOS: ~/Library/Logs/tockler/main.log

Windows: %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\tockler\logs\main.log

Development

Quick Start

Prerequisites: Node, Git.

git clone https://github.com/Maygo/tockler.git  # Download this project

npm install yarn -g     # install yarn or binary from https://yarnpkg.com

Start application

Renderer and main process builds have been separated. It's easier to boilerplate this project and switch client framework.

React client (renderer)

cd client/
yarn install            # Install dependencies
yarn start

Electron (main)

cd electron/
yarn install            # Install dependencies
yarn start

Build scripts samples are in travis/appveyor files.

Testing MAS build

In electron-builder.yml replace type: development provisioningProfile: development.provisionprofile

Signing

https://4sysops.com/archives/sign-your-powershell-scripts-to-increase-security/' in powershell as admin

$cert = Get-ChildItem -Path Cert:\CurrentUser\My -CodeSigningCert
Set-AuthenticodeSignature -FilePath '.\app\get-foreground-window-title.ps1' -Certificate $cert

Snapcraft token

To generate SNAP_TOKEN run snapcraft export-login --snaps=tockler --acls=package_upload,channel --channels=stable - Copy output and Add SNAP_TOKEN to travis environment variables. In travis we have: echo "$SNAP_TOKEN" | snapcraft login --with -

Errors

while installing electron deps: electron-builder Error: Unresolved node modules: ref

Quick fix: ELECTRON_BUILDER_ALLOW_UNRESOLVED_DEPENDENCIES=true yarn

Author: MayGo
Source Code: https://github.com/MayGo/tockler 
License: GPL-2.0 license

#electron #windows #javascript #typescript 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Tockler: Automatically Track Applications Usage and Working Time
Leonard  Paucek

Leonard Paucek

1656280800

Jump to Local IDE Code Directly From Browser React Component

React Dev Inspector

Jump to local IDE code directly from browser React component by just a simple click

This package allows users to jump to local IDE code directly from browser React component by just a simple click, which is similar to Chrome inspector but more advanced.

View Demo View Github

Preview

press hotkey (ctrl⌃ + shift⇧ + commmand⌘ + c), then click the HTML element you wish to inspect.

screen record gif (8M size):

Jump to local IDE code directly from browser React component by just a simple click

Installation

npm i -D react-dev-inspector

Usage

Users need to add React component and apply webpack config before connecting your React project with 'react-dev-inspector'.

Note: You should NOT use this package, and React component, webpack config in production mode


 

1. Add Inspector React Component

import React from 'react'
import { Inspector, InspectParams } from 'react-dev-inspector'

const InspectorWrapper = process.env.NODE_ENV === 'development'
  ? Inspector
  : React.Fragment

export const Layout = () => {
  // ...

  return (
     {}}
      onClickElement={(params: InspectParams) => {}}
    >
     
       ...
     
    
  )
}


 

2. Set up Inspector Config

You should add:

  • an inspector babel plugin, to inject source code location info
    • react-dev-inspector/plugins/babel
  • an server api middleware, to open local IDE
    • import { launchEditorMiddleware } from 'react-dev-inspector/plugins/webpack'

to your current project development config.

Such as add babel plugin into your .babelrc or webpack babel-loader config,
add api middleware into your webpack-dev-server config or other server setup.


 

There are some example ways to set up, please pick the one fit your project best.

In common cases, if you're using webpack, you can see #raw-webpack-config,

If your project happen to use vite / nextjs / create-react-app and so on, you can also try out our integrated plugins / examples with

raw webpack config

Example:

// .babelrc.js
module.exports = {
  plugins: [
    /**
     * react-dev-inspector plugin, options docs see:
     * https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector#inspector-babel-plugin-options
     */
    'react-dev-inspector/plugins/babel',
  ],
}
// webpack.config.ts
import type { Configuration } from 'webpack'
import { launchEditorMiddleware } from 'react-dev-inspector/plugins/webpack'

const config: Configuration = {
  /**
   * [server side] webpack dev server side middleware for launch IDE app
   */
  devServer: {
    before: (app) => {
      app.use(launchEditorMiddleware)
    },
  },
}


 

usage with Vite2

example project see: https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector/tree/master/examples/vite2

example vite.config.ts:

import { defineConfig } from 'vite'
import { inspectorServer } from 'react-dev-inspector/plugins/vite'

export default defineConfig({
  plugins: [
    inspectorServer(),
  ],
})


 

usage with Next.js

use Next.js Custom Server + Customizing Babel Config

example project see: https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector/tree/master/examples/nextjs

in server.js, example:

...

const {
  queryParserMiddleware,
  launchEditorMiddleware,
} = require('react-dev-inspector/plugins/webpack')

app.prepare().then(() => {
  createServer((req, res) => {
    /**
     * middlewares, from top to bottom
     */
    const middlewares = [
      /**
       * react-dev-inspector configuration two middlewares for nextjs
       */
      queryParserMiddleware,
      launchEditorMiddleware,

      /** Next.js default app handle */
        (req, res) => handle(req, res),
    ]

    const middlewarePipeline = middlewares.reduceRight(
      (next, middleware) => (
        () => { middleware(req, res, next) }
      ),
      () => {},
    )

    middlewarePipeline()

  }).listen(PORT, (err) => {
    if (err) throw err
    console.debug(`> Ready on http://localhost:${PORT}`)
  })
})

in package.json, example:

  "scripts": {
-    "dev": "next dev",
+    "dev": "node server.js",
    "build": "next build"
  }

in .babelrc.js, example:

module.exports = {
  plugins: [
    /**
     * react-dev-inspector plugin, options docs see:
     * https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector#inspector-babel-plugin-options
     */
    'react-dev-inspector/plugins/babel',
  ],
}


 

usage with create-react-app

cra + react-app-rewired + customize-cra example config-overrides.js:

example project see: https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector/tree/master/examples/cra

const { ReactInspectorPlugin } = require('react-dev-inspector/plugins/webpack')
const {
  addBabelPlugin,
  addWebpackPlugin,
} = require('customize-cra')

module.exports = override(
  addBabelPlugin([
    'react-dev-inspector/plugins/babel',
    // plugin options docs see:
    // https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector#inspector-babel-plugin-options
    {
      excludes: [
        /xxxx-want-to-ignore/,
      ],
    },
  ]),
  addWebpackPlugin(
    new ReactInspectorPlugin(),
  ),
)


 

usage with Umi3

example project see: https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector/tree/master/examples/umi3

Example .umirc.dev.ts:

// https://umijs.org/config/
import { defineConfig } from 'umi'

export default defineConfig({
  plugins: [
    'react-dev-inspector/plugins/umi/react-inspector',
  ],
  inspectorConfig: {
    // babel plugin options docs see:
    // https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector#inspector-babel-plugin-options
    excludes: [],
  },
})


 

usage with Umi2

Example .umirc.dev.js:

import { launchEditorMiddleware } from 'react-dev-inspector/plugins/webpack'

export default {
  // ...
  extraBabelPlugins: [
    // plugin options docs see:
    // https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector#inspector-babel-plugin-options
    'react-dev-inspector/plugins/babel',
  ],

  /**
   * And you need to set `false` to `dll` in `umi-plugin-react`,
   * becase these is a umi2 bug that `dll` cannot work with `devServer.before`
   *
   * https://github.com/umijs/umi/issues/2599
   * https://github.com/umijs/umi/issues/2161
   */
  chainWebpack(config, { webpack }) {
    const originBefore = config.toConfig().devServer

    config.devServer.before((app, server, compiler) => {
      
      app.use(launchEditorMiddleware)
      
      originBefore?.before?.(app, server, compiler)
    })

    return config  
  },
}

usage with Ice.js

Example build.json:

// https://ice.work/docs/guide/basic/build
{
  "plugins": [
    "react-dev-inspector/plugins/ice",
  ]
}


 

Examples Project Code


 

Configuration

Component Props

checkout TS definition under react-dev-inspector/es/Inspector.d.ts.

PropertyDescriptionTypeDefault
keysinspector hotkeys

supported keys see: https://github.com/jaywcjlove/hotkeys#supported-keys
string[]['control', 'shift', 'command', 'c']
disableLaunchEditordisable editor launching

(launch by default in dev Mode, but not in production mode)
booleanfalse
onHoverElementtriggered when mouse hover in inspector mode(params: InspectParams) => void-
onClickElementtriggered when mouse hover in inspector mode(params: InspectParams) => void-
// import type { InspectParams } from 'react-dev-inspector'

interface InspectParams {
  /** hover / click event target dom element */
  element: HTMLElement,
  /** nearest named react component fiber for dom element */
  fiber?: React.Fiber,
  /** source file line / column / path info for react component */
  codeInfo?: {
    lineNumber: string,
    columnNumber: string,
    /**
    * code source file relative path to dev-server cwd(current working directory)
    * need use with `react-dev-inspector/plugins/babel`
    */
    relativePath?: string,
    /**
    * code source file absolute path
    * just need use with `@babel/plugin-transform-react-jsx-source` which auto set by most framework
    */
    absolutePath?: string,
  },
  /** react component name for dom element */
  name?: string,
}


 

Inspector Babel Plugin Options

interface InspectorPluginOptions {
  /** override process.cwd() */
  cwd?: string,
  /** patterns to exclude matched files */
  excludes?: (string | RegExp)[],
}


 

Inspector Loader Props

// import type { ParserPlugin, ParserOptions } from '@babel/parser'
// import type { InspectorConfig } from 'react-dev-inspector/plugins/webpack'

interface InspectorConfig {
  /** patterns to exclude matched files */
  excludes?: (string | RegExp)[],
  /**
   * add extra plugins for babel parser
   * default is ['typescript', 'jsx', 'decorators-legacy', 'classProperties']
   */
  babelPlugins?: ParserPlugin[],
  /** extra babel parser options */
  babelOptions?: ParserOptions,
}


 

IDE / Editor config

This package uses react-dev-utils to launch your local IDE application, but, which one will be open?

In fact, it uses an environment variable named REACT_EDITOR to specify an IDE application, but if you do not set this variable, it will try to open a common IDE that you have open or installed once it is certified.

For example, if you want it always open VSCode when inspection clicked, set export REACT_EDITOR=code in your shell.


 

VSCode

install VSCode command line tools, see the official docs
install-vscode-cli

set env to shell, like .bashrc or .zshrc

export REACT_EDITOR=code


 

WebStorm

  • just set env with an absolute path to shell, like .bashrc or .zshrc (only MacOS)
export REACT_EDITOR='/Applications/WebStorm.app/Contents/MacOS/webstorm'

OR

install WebStorm command line tools
Jump to local IDE code directly from browser React component by just a simple click

then set env to shell, like .bashrc or .zshrc

export REACT_EDITOR=webstorm


 

Vim

Yes! you can also use vim if you want, just set env to shell

export REACT_EDITOR=vim


 

How It Works

Stage 1 - Compile Time

  • [babel plugin] inject source file path/line/column to JSX data attributes props

Stage 2 - Web React Runtime

[React component] Inspector Component in react, for listen hotkeys, and request api to dev-server for open IDE.

Specific, when you click a component DOM, the Inspector will try to obtain its source file info (path/line/column), then request launch-editor api (in stage 3) with absolute file path.

Stage 3 - Dev-server Side

[middleware] setup launchEditorMiddleware in webpack dev-server (or other dev-server), to open file in IDE according to the request params.

Only need in development mode,and you want to open IDE when click a component element.

Not need in prod mode, or you just want inspect dom without open IDE (set disableLaunchEditor={true} to Inspector component props)

Analysis of Theory


Author: zthxxx
Source code: https://github.com/zthxxx/react-dev-inspector
License: MIT license

#react-native #react 

Beth  Cooper

Beth Cooper

1659694200

Easy Activity Tracking for Models, Similar to Github's Public Activity

PublicActivity

public_activity provides easy activity tracking for your ActiveRecord, Mongoid 3 and MongoMapper models in Rails 3 and 4.

Simply put: it can record what happens in your application and gives you the ability to present those recorded activities to users - in a similar way to how GitHub does it.

!! WARNING: README for unreleased version below. !!

You probably don't want to read the docs for this unreleased version 2.0.

For the stable 1.5.X readme see: https://github.com/chaps-io/public_activity/blob/1-5-stable/README.md

About

Here is a simple example showing what this gem is about:

Example usage

Tutorials

Screencast

Ryan Bates made a great screencast describing how to integrate Public Activity.

Tutorial

A great step-by-step guide on implementing activity feeds using public_activity by Ilya Bodrov.

Online demo

You can see an actual application using this gem here: http://public-activity-example.herokuapp.com/feed

The source code of the demo is hosted here: https://github.com/pokonski/activity_blog

Setup

Gem installation

You can install public_activity as you would any other gem:

gem install public_activity

or in your Gemfile:

gem 'public_activity'

Database setup

By default public_activity uses Active Record. If you want to use Mongoid or MongoMapper as your backend, create an initializer file in your Rails application with the corresponding code inside:

For Mongoid:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongoid
end

For MongoMapper:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongo_mapper
end

(ActiveRecord only) Create migration for activities and migrate the database (in your Rails project):

rails g public_activity:migration
rake db:migrate

Model configuration

Include PublicActivity::Model and add tracked to the model you want to keep track of:

For ActiveRecord:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For Mongoid:

class Article
  include Mongoid::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For MongoMapper:

class Article
  include MongoMapper::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

And now, by default create/update/destroy activities are recorded in activities table. This is all you need to start recording activities for basic CRUD actions.

Optional: If you don't need #tracked but still want the comfort of #create_activity, you can include only the lightweight Common module instead of Model.

Custom activities

You can trigger custom activities by setting all your required parameters and triggering create_activity on the tracked model, like this:

@article.create_activity key: 'article.commented_on', owner: current_user

See this entry http://rubydoc.info/gems/public_activity/PublicActivity/Common:create_activity for more details.

Displaying activities

To display them you simply query the PublicActivity::Activity model:

# notifications_controller.rb
def index
  @activities = PublicActivity::Activity.all
end

And in your views:

<%= render_activities(@activities) %>

Note: render_activities is an alias for render_activity and does the same.

Layouts

You can also pass options to both activity#render and #render_activity methods, which are passed deeper to the internally used render_partial method. A useful example would be to render activities wrapped in layout, which shares common elements of an activity, like a timestamp, owner's avatar etc:

<%= render_activities(@activities, layout: :activity) %>

The activity will be wrapped with the app/views/layouts/_activity.html.erb layout, in the above example.

Important: please note that layouts for activities are also partials. Hence the _ prefix.

Locals

Sometimes, it's desirable to pass additional local variables to partials. It can be done this way:

<%= render_activity(@activity, locals: {friends: current_user.friends}) %>

Note: Before 1.4.0, one could pass variables directly to the options hash for #render_activity and access it from activity parameters. This functionality is retained in 1.4.0 and later, but the :locals method is preferred, since it prevents bugs from shadowing variables from activity parameters in the database.

Activity views

public_activity looks for views in app/views/public_activity.

For example, if you have an activity with :key set to "activity.user.changed_avatar", the gem will look for a partial in app/views/public_activity/user/_changed_avatar.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

Hint: the "activity." prefix in :key is completely optional and kept for backwards compatibility, you can skip it in new projects.

If you would like to fallback to a partial, you can utilize the fallback parameter to specify the path of a partial to use when one is missing:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: 'default') %>

When used in this manner, if a partial with the specified :key cannot be located it will use the partial defined in the fallback instead. In the example above this would resolve to public_activity/_default.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

If a view file does not exist then ActionView::MisingTemplate will be raised. If you wish to fallback to the old behaviour and use an i18n based translation in this situation you can specify a :fallback parameter of text to fallback to this mechanism like such:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: :text) %>

i18n

Translations are used by the #text method, to which you can pass additional options in form of a hash. #render method uses translations when view templates have not been provided. You can render pure i18n strings by passing {display: :i18n} to #render_activity or #render.

Translations should be put in your locale .yml files. To render pure strings from I18n Example structure:

activity:
  article:
    create: 'Article has been created'
    update: 'Someone has edited the article'
    destroy: 'Some user removed an article!'

This structure is valid for activities with keys "activity.article.create" or "article.create". As mentioned before, "activity." part of the key is optional.

Testing

For RSpec you can first disable public_activity and add require helper methods in the rails_helper.rb with:

#rails_helper.rb
require 'public_activity/testing'

PublicActivity.enabled = false

In your specs you can then blockwise decide whether to turn public_activity on or off.

# file_spec.rb
PublicActivity.with_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

PublicActivity.without_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

Documentation

For more documentation go here

Common examples

Set the Activity's owner to current_user by default

You can set up a default value for :owner by doing this:

  1. Include PublicActivity::StoreController in your ApplicationController like this:
class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  include PublicActivity::StoreController
end
  1. Use Proc in :owner attribute for tracked class method in your desired model. For example:
class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  tracked owner: Proc.new{ |controller, model| controller.current_user }
end

Note: current_user applies to Devise, if you are using a different authentication gem or your own code, change the current_user to a method you use.

Disable tracking for a class or globally

If you need to disable tracking temporarily, for example in tests or db/seeds.rb then you can use PublicActivity.enabled= attribute like below:

# Disable p_a globally
PublicActivity.enabled = false

# Perform some operations that would normally be tracked by p_a:
Article.create(title: 'New article')

# Switch it back on
PublicActivity.enabled = true

You can also disable public_activity for a specific class:

# Disable p_a for Article class
Article.public_activity_off

# p_a will not do anything here:
@article = Article.create(title: 'New article')

# But will be enabled for other classes:
# (creation of the comment will be recorded if you are tracking the Comment class)
@article.comments.create(body: 'some comment!')

# Enable it again for Article:
Article.public_activity_on

Create custom activities

Besides standard, automatic activities created on CRUD actions on your model (deactivatable), you can post your own activities that can be triggered without modifying the tracked model. There are a few ways to do this, as PublicActivity gives three tiers of options to be set.

Instant options

Because every activity needs a key (otherwise: NoKeyProvided is raised), the shortest and minimal way to post an activity is:

@user.create_activity :mood_changed
# the key of the action will be user.mood_changed
@user.create_activity action: :mood_changed # this is exactly the same as above

Besides assigning your key (which is obvious from the code), it will take global options from User class (given in #tracked method during class definition) and overwrite them with instance options (set on @user by #activity method). You can read more about options and how PublicActivity inherits them for you here.

Note the action parameter builds the key like this: "#{model_name}.#{action}". You can read further on options for #create_activity here.

To provide more options, you can do:

@user.create_activity action: 'poke', parameters: {reason: 'bored'}, recipient: @friend, owner: current_user

In this example, we have provided all the things we could for a standard Activity.

Use custom fields on Activity

Besides the few fields that every Activity has (key, owner, recipient, trackable, parameters), you can also set custom fields. This could be very beneficial, as parameters are a serialized hash, which cannot be queried easily from the database. That being said, use custom fields when you know that you will set them very often and search by them (don't forget database indexes :) ).

Set owner and recipient based on associations

class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked owner: :commenter, recipient: :commentee

  belongs_to :commenter, :class_name => "User"
  belongs_to :commentee, :class_name => "User"
end

Resolve parameters from a Symbol or Proc

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked only: [:update], parameters: :tracked_values
  
  def tracked_values
   {}.tap do |hash|
     hash[:tags] = tags if tags_changed?
   end
  end
end

Setup

Skip this step if you are using ActiveRecord in Rails 4 or Mongoid

The first step is similar in every ORM available (except mongoid):

PublicActivity::Activity.class_eval do
  attr_accessible :custom_field
end

place this code under config/initializers/public_activity.rb, you have to create it first.

To be able to assign to that field, we need to move it to the mass assignment sanitizer's whitelist.

Migration

If you're using ActiveRecord, you will also need to provide a migration to add the actual field to the Activity. Taken from our tests:

class AddCustomFieldToActivities < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    change_table :activities do |t|
      t.string :custom_field
    end
  end
end

Assigning custom fields

Assigning is done by the same methods that you use for normal parameters: #tracked, #create_activity. You can just pass the name of your custom variable and assign its value. Even better, you can pass it to #tracked to tell us how to harvest your data for custom fields so we can do that for you.

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked custom_field: proc {|controller, model| controller.some_helper }
end

Help

If you need help with using public_activity please visit our discussion group and ask a question there:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/public-activity

Please do not ask general questions in the Github Issues.


Author: public-activity
Source code: https://github.com/public-activity/public_activity
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

Nat  Grady

Nat Grady

1657572540

Tockler: Automatically Track Applications Usage and Working Time

Tockler

Automatically track applications usage and working time.

With Tockler you can go back in time and see what you were working on. You can get information on what apps were used - exactly at what time - and what title the application had at that moment. This is enough to determine how much you did something.

Track how you spent your time on a computer.

Tockler tracks active applications usage and computer state. It records active application titles. It tracks idle, offline, and online state. You can see this data with a nice interactive timeline chart.

Analyze your computer usage

See you total online time today, yesterday, or any other day. In monthly calendar views and with charts.

Tockler needs YOUR support. Currently, every expense is coming from my pocket. 
It would be awesome if this project would keep itself alive from donations.

 Tockler is free to download and use.

Light theme

Timeline Settings Summary Summary Search Tray window

Dark theme

Timeline Settings Summary Summary Search Tray window

Theme by StyleStack.com

Feedback

Feel free to make feature requests by creating a issue and 'Star' this project.

Made with

Logs

By default, tockler writes logs to the following locations:

Linux: ~/.config/tockler/logs/main.log

macOS: ~/Library/Logs/tockler/main.log

Windows: %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\tockler\logs\main.log

Development

Quick Start

Prerequisites: Node, Git.

git clone https://github.com/Maygo/tockler.git  # Download this project

npm install yarn -g     # install yarn or binary from https://yarnpkg.com

Start application

Renderer and main process builds have been separated. It's easier to boilerplate this project and switch client framework.

React client (renderer)

cd client/
yarn install            # Install dependencies
yarn start

Electron (main)

cd electron/
yarn install            # Install dependencies
yarn start

Build scripts samples are in travis/appveyor files.

Testing MAS build

In electron-builder.yml replace type: development provisioningProfile: development.provisionprofile

Signing

https://4sysops.com/archives/sign-your-powershell-scripts-to-increase-security/' in powershell as admin

$cert = Get-ChildItem -Path Cert:\CurrentUser\My -CodeSigningCert
Set-AuthenticodeSignature -FilePath '.\app\get-foreground-window-title.ps1' -Certificate $cert

Snapcraft token

To generate SNAP_TOKEN run snapcraft export-login --snaps=tockler --acls=package_upload,channel --channels=stable - Copy output and Add SNAP_TOKEN to travis environment variables. In travis we have: echo "$SNAP_TOKEN" | snapcraft login --with -

Errors

while installing electron deps: electron-builder Error: Unresolved node modules: ref

Quick fix: ELECTRON_BUILDER_ALLOW_UNRESOLVED_DEPENDENCIES=true yarn

Author: MayGo
Source Code: https://github.com/MayGo/tockler 
License: GPL-2.0 license

#electron #windows #javascript #typescript 

How to Install and Configure Chrony

It is essential to keep the correct time on a server. This is especially true when it comes to processing financial transactions or other vital functions which need to be handled in a specific order. Using the Network Time Protocol (or NTP), computers can synchronize their internal clock times with the internet standard reference clocks. In essence, NTP is a hierarchy of servers. The higher the Stratum number of a server, the more accurate the timing is and the lower the Stratum number of a server is, the lower the accuracy and time stability. Stratus are defined by the distance from the initial reference clock.

#tutorials #atomic clock #centos #chrony #clock #drift #internal time clock #network time protocol #ntp #offset #peers #pool.ntp.org #server time #stratum #system clock #time #time drift #timekeeping #ubuntu #utc

Alice Cook

Alice Cook

1614329473

Fix: G Suite not Working | G Suite Email not Working | Google Business

G Suite is one of the Google products, developed form of Google Apps. It is a single platform to hold cloud computing, collaboration tools, productivity, software, and products. While using it, many a time, it’s not working, and users have a question– How to fix G Suite not working on iPhone? It can be resolved easily by restarting the device, and if unable to do so, you can reach our specialists whenever you want.
For more details: https://contactforhelp.com/blog/how-to-fix-the-g-suite-email-not-working-issue/

#g suite email not working #g suite email not working on iphone #g suite email not working on android #suite email not working on windows 10 #g suite email not working on mac #g suite email not syncing