John David

John David

1559880445

Build Your First App with React's Context API

Build Your First App with React’s Context API. One of React’s latest features is the Context API. Up until now, Context within React has been somewhat experimental, but still used in quite a few popular libraries, like Redux and React Router.

One of React’s latest features is the Context API. Up until now, Context within React has been somewhat experimental, but still used in quite a few popular libraries, like Redux and React Router. There are plenty of ways to avoid using Context, but sometimes it can be really useful.

One really good use case for Context is keeping track of authentication. In fact, React’s official documentation for the Context API mentions it can be used for authentication.

Context is designed to share data that can be considered “global” for a tree of React components, such as the current authenticated user, theme, or preferred language.### Table of Contents

The examples in their documentation are helpful, but they don’t actually include an example of sharing the authenticated user. I’ll show you here how one way to use the new Context API to simply keep track of whether a user is authenticated, and some basic profile information.

React Context in a Nutshell

Before going too far down the rabbit hole, let me give you a quick introduction into the Context API. As of React version 16, React ships with a function called createContext that takes a single value parameter. Calling createContext gives you both a Provider and Consumer component.

You can render the Provider component anywhere in your app - in multiple places if you like. If there is a Consumer anywhere inside the Provider (even deeply nested somewhere), it will have access to that value parameter in the form of a render function as a child. Each Provider can also override the value. For example:

import { createContext } from 'react';

const { Provider, Consumer } = createContext('default value');

export default () =>
  <main>
    <Provider>
      <Consumer>{value => <span>{value}</span>}</Consumer>
    </Provider>
    <Provider value="overridden value">
      <div>
        <Consumer>{value => <span>{value}</span>}</Consumer>
      </div>
    </Provider>
  </main>
);

Will render the following:

<main>
  <span>default value</span>
  </div>
    <span>overridden value</span>
  </div>
</main>

Because Provider is just a component, you can easily create a wrapper component that passes its state into the value prop of the Provider. Then you will have access to that component’s state anywhere in the app via the Consumer. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to use one component to keep track of auth state changes and pass that information down via the Context API.

Build a Simple React App

The quickest way to get started with React in my experience is using the official Create React App CLI. It bootstraps an app for you giving you some decent defaults. To use it, install it globally with NPM, then run it with the name of your app as a parameter. This will create a new folder with everything you need to get started, and will even install the dependencies for you. You can then run the app using yarn start.

npm install --global create-react-app@1.5.2 yarn@1.7.0
create-react-app react-context
cd react-context
yarn start

You should now be able to see your app running by visiting [http://localhost:3000](http://localhost:3000 "http://localhost:3000") with your browser.

For this tutorial, I’ll show you how you can take advantage of the new Context API to cut down some of the boilerplate that is often paired with authentication. Before getting started with Context, you’ll need to set up authentication in order to tie it in.

Create an Okta Application

One simple way to add authentication to your project is with Okta. Okta is a cloud service that allows developers to create, edit, and securely store user accounts and user account data, and connect them with one or multiple applications. Our API enables you to:

If you don’t already have one, sign up for a forever-free developer account. Log in to your developer console, navigate to Applications, then click Add Application. Select Single-Page App, then click Next.

Since Create React App runs on port 3000 by default, you should add that as a Base URI and Login Redirect URI. Your settings should look like the following:

Click Done to save your app, then copy your Client ID and paste it as a variable into a file called .env.local in the root of your project. This will allow you to access the file in your code without needing to store credentials in source control. You’ll also need to add your organization URL (without the -admin suffix). Environment variables (other than NODE_ENV) need to start with REACT_APP_ in order for Create React App to read them, so the file should end up looking like this:

.env.local

REACT_APP_OKTA_CLIENT_ID={yourClientId}
REACT_APP_OKTA_ORG_URL=https://{yourOktaDomain}

The easiest way to add authentication with Okta is to use Okta’s React SDK. You’ll also need to add routes, which can be done using React Router. I’ll also have you start adding icons to the app (for now as an avatar icon to show you’re logged in).

yarn add @okta/okta-react@1.0.3 react-router-dom@4.3.1

For routes to work properly using React Router, you need to wrap your whole application in a router (for the web, you need to use BrowserRouter). Similarly, to allow access to authentication anywhere in the app, you need to wrap the app in a Security component provided by Okta. Okta also needs access to the router, so the Security component should be nested inside the router. You should modify your src/index.js file to look like the following:

src/index.js

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import { BrowserRouter } from 'react-router-dom';
import { Security } from '@okta/okta-react';

import './index.css';
import App from './App';
import registerServiceWorker from './registerServiceWorker';

const oktaConfig = {
  issuer: `${process.env.REACT_APP_OKTA_ORG_URL}/oauth2/default`,
  redirect_uri: `${window.location.origin}/implicit/callback`,
  client_id: process.env.REACT_APP_OKTA_CLIENT_ID,
};

ReactDOM.render(
  <BrowserRouter>
    <Security {...oktaConfig}>
      <App />
    </Security>
  </BrowserRouter>,
  document.getElementById('root'),
);

registerServiceWorker();

Now in src/App.js you can use Routes that tell the app to only render a certain component if the current URL matches the given path. You can also use Links to create a link to that route (or page) and properly modify the browser’s history to work in a single-page app.

Go ahead and create a nav tag with links to the Home page (/) and a Profile page (/profile). Also, create a main tag containing your routes. For now just stub in some inline components that render the name of the page.

By using Okta’s SecureRoute you will find that whenever you try to go to that page you will need to be logged in. If you’re not currently logged in, you’ll be redirected to /implicit/callback to log in. In order for that route to actually log you in, you also need to create a route that renders Okta’s ImplicitCallback component.

src/App.js

--- a/src/App.js
+++ b/src/App.js
@@ -1,4 +1,7 @@
 import React, { Component } from 'react';
+import { Link, Route } from 'react-router-dom';
+import { SecureRoute, ImplicitCallback } from '@okta/okta-react';
+
 import logo from './logo.svg';
 import './App.css';

@@ -9,10 +12,16 @@ class App extends Component {
         <header className="App-header">
           <img src={logo} className="App-logo" alt="logo" />
           <h1 className="App-title">Welcome to React</h1>
+          <nav className="App-nav">
+            <Link to="/">Home</Link>
+            <Link to="/profile">Profile</Link>
+          </nav>
         </header>
-        <p className="App-intro">
-          To get started, edit <code>src/App.js</code> and save to reload.
-        </p>
+        <main className="App-intro">
+          <Route exact path="/" component={() => 'Home Page'} />
+          <SecureRoute exact path="/profile" component={() => 'Profile page'} />
+          <Route path="/implicit/callback" component={ImplicitCallback} />
+        </main>
       </div>
     );
   }

Note: You can apply a diff in git by copying it to a file and using the git apply command. If you’re following along this avoids having to write the file out manually. For example, if you save the above as a file named app.diff, then from your project folder, you could type git apply app.diff and it should apply those changes.

To make this look a little nicer, add a bit of CSS to let the header expand to the content, give the main part of the app some padding, and make the nav links a bit more readable.

src/App.css

--- a/src/App.css
+++ b/src/App.css
@@ -9,17 +9,35 @@

 .App-header {
   background-color: #222;
-  height: 150px;
+  min-height: 150px;
   padding: 20px;
   color: white;
 }

+.App-nav {
+  display: flex;
+  align-items: center;
+  justify-content: center;
+}
+
+.App-nav a {
+  color: white;
+  padding: 0 5px;
+  text-decoration: none;
+  cursor: pointer;
+}
+
+.App-nav a:hover {
+  text-decoration: underline;
+}
+
 .App-title {
   font-size: 1.5em;
 }

 .App-intro {
   font-size: large;
+  margin: 1em;
 }

You should now have a slightly modified version of the default page from Create React App that says “Home page”. You should also now be able to click on the Profile link and you will be prompted to log in to your account. Upon success, you’ll be taken to the profile page, that at the moment just says Profile page.

Note: You may need to restart the development server after adding the environment variables. You can do this by going to the terminal running the server and hitting ctrl-c, then re-running the yarn start command.

Add a User Greeting with React Context

Using React’s new Context API, you can create a component that you will use to wrap your entire application, similar to the way BrowserRouter or Security works. Once that Provider is in place, you can access pieces of authentication anywhere in the application without a lot of boilerplate.

In this case, create a context using createContext. You’ll then check when the component is first mounted, and again whenever it updates, if the user is authenticated. If this is different from the current state, then it also checks for the user and saves that as well. The reason the state is only updated whenever the authentication is different from the previous state is that otherwise, the componentDidUpdate function would trigger another update, sending this component into an infinite render loop.

To keep this simple to use, the default export is the Context’s Consumer. The Provider component is exported separately and is wrapped with Okta’s withAuth to give it access to the auth prop.

Note: Checking authentication during componentDidUpdate is admittedly not the most efficient method. At the time of this writing, there is not a simple way to detect when the state of authorization changes, so this is a simple approach for demo purposes. This example might not work well for larger applications.

src/Auth.js

import React, { createContext, Component } from 'react';
import { withAuth } from '@okta/okta-react';

const AuthContext = createContext({
  user: null,
  isAuthenticated: null,
});

export default AuthContext.Consumer;

class AuthController extends Component {
  state = {
    user: null,
    isAuthenticated: null,
  }

  componentDidUpdate() {
    this.checkAuthentication();
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    this.checkAuthentication();
  }

  async checkAuthentication() {
    const isAuthenticated = await this.props.auth.isAuthenticated();
    if (isAuthenticated !== this.state.isAuthenticated) {
      const user = await this.props.auth.getUser();
      this.setState({ isAuthenticated, user });
    }
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <AuthContext.Provider value={this.state}>
        {this.props.children}
      </AuthContext.Provider>
    );
  }
}

export const AuthProvider = withAuth(AuthController);

The app’s main entry point now needs to be wrapped in the AuthProvider. It needs to be inside Security so that it can access the auth using withAuth.

src/index.js

--- a/src/index.js
+++ b/src/index.js
@@ -6,6 +6,7 @@ import { Security } from '@okta/okta-react';
 import './index.css';
 import App from './App';
 import registerServiceWorker from './registerServiceWorker';
+import { AuthProvider } from './Auth';

 const oktaConfig = {
   issuer: `${process.env.REACT_APP_OKTA_ORG_URL}/oauth2/default`,
@@ -16,7 +17,9 @@ const oktaConfig = {
 ReactDOM.render(
   <BrowserRouter>
     <Security {...oktaConfig}>
-      <App />
+      <AuthProvider>
+        <App />
+      </AuthProvider>
     </Security>
   </BrowserRouter>,
   document.getElementById('root')

Now that the Context Provider is set up and ready to go, you can start using the Consumer. For a quick example, try changing the homepage to greet the user when they’re logged in. If they aren’t logged in, keep the old message of Welcome to React.

React Contexts take a render function as its child element. The parameters passed in are going to be the state of the provider (the data passed into value). Because of this, to access the user, you need to pass in a function that expects an object containing the key user. If this is null then authentication is still loading. If it’s undefined then the user is not authenticated. Otherwise, it will contain the user’s basic profile information. Go ahead and ignore the loading state for now, and only greet the user once you have their information.

src/App.js

--- a/src/App.js
+++ b/src/App.js
@@ -5,13 +5,21 @@ import { SecureRoute, ImplicitCallback } from '@okta/okta-react';
 import logo from './logo.svg';
 import './App.css';

+import Auth from './Auth';
+
+const welcomeUser = ({ user }) => user
+  ? `Welcome, ${user.given_name || user.name}!`
+  : 'Welcome to React';
+
 class App extends Component {
   render() {
     return (
       <div className="App">
         <header className="App-header">
           <img src={logo} className="App-logo" alt="logo" />
-          <h1 className="App-title">Welcome to React</h1>
+          <h1 className="App-title">
+            <Auth>{welcomeUser}</Auth>
+          </h1>
           <nav className="App-nav">
             <Link to="/">Home</Link>
             <Link to="/profile">Profile</Link>

Create a Login/Logout Link

A pretty common scenario with authentication is having a button or link that you can click to log you in when you’re authenticated. You can use the same React Context to determine whether or not a user is logged in.

In order to properly log the user in or out when they click the link, you can wrap the component with withAuth to get access to the login and logout functions of auth.

This time, you don’t want the user to click either Login or Logout if you’re not sure what the state of authentication is yet. You could implement some sort of loading icon here, but for this demo just render nothing until you know whether or not the user is logged in.

src/LoginButton.js

import React from 'react';
import { withAuth } from '@okta/okta-react';

import Auth from './Auth';

export default withAuth(({ auth }) => (
  <Auth>
    {({ isAuthenticated }) => {
      if (isAuthenticated === null) return null;

      return (
        <a onClick={() => isAuthenticated ? auth.logout() : auth.login()}>
          {isAuthenticated ? 'Logout' : 'Login'}
        </a>
      );
    }}
  </Auth>
));

Now you can add the Login/Logout link to your list of nav items:

src/App.js

--- a/src/App.js
+++ b/src/App.js
@@ -6,6 +6,7 @@ import logo from './logo.svg';
 import './App.css';

 import Auth from './Auth';
+import LoginButton from './LoginButton';

 const welcomeUser = ({ user }) => user
   ? `Welcome, ${user.given_name || user.name}!`
@@ -23,6 +24,7 @@ class App extends Component {
           <nav className="App-nav">
             <Link to="/">Home</Link>
             <Link to="/profile">Profile</Link>
+            <LoginButton />
           </nav>
         </header>
         <main className="App-intro">

Create a Real Profile Page

From the user value in your Context, you can also now get access to the user’s basic profile information.

Semantically, a dl HTML tag is a “Description List” element. This is a good, basic way to display metadata. However, you’ll probably want to add a little bit of simple styling. This will make sure the text isn’t center-aligned, and make the term (the dt tag) bold. Create a new file Profile.css that you’ll import in your profile page.

src/Profile.css

dl {
  text-align: left;
}

dt {
  padding: 4px 0;
  font-weight: bold;
}

Lodash provides a suite of utilities to manipulate data. To keep things simple and automated, try using that to convert the name of a key to something more personable. The startCase function will convert a string like given_name to Given Name. To add Lodash as a dependency, run the following:

yarn add lodash@4.17.10

The updated_at key is actually just a number representing the number of seconds from 1970, so you can convert that to a human-readable string in JavaScript using new Date(updated_at * 1000).toString().

Putting all that together, you can create a functional component that takes a user prop, and wrap that in the Auth Context Consumer. This time, show a simple loading message if the user isn’t loaded yet. Technically, the user will be undefined if authentication finished and there is no user, but because this is in a SecureRoute, if there is no user then the page will redirect to the home page.

src/Profile.js

import React, { Fragment } from 'react';
import { startCase } from 'lodash';

import Auth from './Auth';
import './Profile.css';

const ProfilePage = ({ user }) => {
  if (!user) return 'Loading...';

  return (
    <dl>
      {Object.keys(user).sort().map(key => (
        <Fragment key={key}>
          <dt>{startCase(key)}</dt>
          <dd>{key === 'updated_at' ? new Date(user[key] * 1000).toString() : user[key]}</dd>
        </Fragment>
      ))}
    </dl>
  );
}

export default () => <Auth>{ProfilePage}</Auth>;

In your app’s routes, replace the mock profile page with a reference to the real one you just created:

--- a/src/App.js
+++ b/src/App.js
@@ -7,6 +7,7 @@ import './App.css';

 import Auth from './Auth';
 import LoginButton from './LoginButton';
+import ProfilePage from './Profile';

 const welcomeUser = ({ user }) => user
   ? `Welcome, ${user.given_name || user.name}!`
@@ -29,7 +30,7 @@ class App extends Component {
         </header>
         <main className="App-intro">
           <Route exact path="/" component={() => 'Home Page'} />
-          <SecureRoute exact path="/profile" component={() => 'Profile page'} />
+          <SecureRoute exact path="/profile" component={ProfilePage} />
           <Route path="/implicit/callback" component={ImplicitCallback} />
         </main>
       </div>

Now when you go to the profile page, you get some details about the logged in user.

Learn More

React Tutorial: Building and Securing Your First App

Simple User Authentication in React

React Router: Add the Power of Navigation

Learn React - React Crash Course 2019 - React Tutorial with Examples

React Hooks Tutorial for Beginners: Getting Started With React Hooks

Learn React.js for Beginners

React - The Complete Guide (incl Hooks, React Router, Redux)

Modern React with Redux [2019 Update]

React Native - The Practical Guide

MERN Stack Front To Back: Full Stack React, Redux & Node.js

Full-Stack Web Apps with Meteor and React

React Hooks

#reactjs #api

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Build Your First App with React's Context API
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Top 10 React Native App Development Companies in USA

React Native is the most popular dynamic framework that provides the opportunity for Android & iOS users to download and use your product. Finding a good React Native development company is incredibly challenging. Use our list as your go-to resource for React Native app development Companies in USA.

List of Top-Rated React Native Mobile App Development Companies in USA:

  1. AppClues Infotech
  2. WebClues Infotech
  3. AppClues Studio
  4. WebClues Global
  5. Data EximIT
  6. Apptunix
  7. BHW Group
  8. Willow Tree:
  9. MindGrub
  10. Prismetric

A Brief about the company details mentioned below:

1. AppClues Infotech
As a React Native Mobile App Development Company in USA, AppClues Infotech offers user-centered mobile app development for iOS & Android. Since their founding in 2014, their React Native developers create beautiful mobile apps.

They have a robust react native app development team that has high knowledge and excellent strength of developing any type of mobile app. They have successfully delivered 450+ mobile apps as per client requirements and functionalities.
Website: https://www.appcluesinfotech.com/

2. WebClues Infotech
WebClues Infotech is the Top-Notch React Native mobile app development company in USA & offering exceptional service worldwide. Since their founding in 2014, they have completed 950+ web & mobile apps projects on time.

They have the best team of developers who has an excellent knowledge of developing the most secure, robust & Powerful React Native Mobile Apps. From start-ups to enterprise organizations, WebClues Infotech provides top-notch React Native App solutions that meet the needs of their clients.
Website: https://www.webcluesinfotech.com/

3. AppClues Studio
AppClues Studio is one of the top React Native mobile app development company in USA and offers the best service worldwide at an affordable price. They have a robust & comprehensive team of React Native App developers who has high strength & extensive knowledge of developing any type of mobile apps.
Website: https://www.appcluesstudio.com/

4. WebClues Global
WebClues Global is one of the best React Native Mobile App Development Company in USA. They provide low-cost & fast React Native Development Services and their React Native App Developers have a high capability of serving projects on more than one platform.

Since their founding in 2014, they have successfully delivered 721+ mobile app projects accurately. They offer versatile React Native App development technology solutions to their clients at an affordable price.
Website: https://www.webcluesglobal.com/

5. Data EximIT
Hire expert React Native app developer from top React Native app development company in USA. Data EximIT is providing high-quality and innovative React Native application development services and support for your next projects. The company has been in the market for more than 8 years and has already gained the trust of 553+ clients and completed 1250+ projects around the globe.

They have a large pool of React Native App developers who can create scalable, full-fledged, and appealing mobile apps to meet the highest industry standards.
Website: https://www.dataeximit.com/

6. Apptunix
Apptunix is the best React Native App Development Company in the USA. It was established in 2013 and vast experience in developing React Native apps. After developing various successful React Native Mobile Apps, the company believes that this technology helps them incorporate advanced features in mobile apps without influencing the user experience.
Website: https://www.apptunix.com/

7. BHW Group
BHW Group is a Top-Notch React Native Mobile App Development Company in the USA. The company has 13+ years of experience in providing qualitative app development services to clients worldwide. They have a compressive pool of React Native App developers who can create scalable, full-fledged, and creative mobile apps to meet the highest industry standards.
Website: https://thebhwgroup.com/

8. Willow Tree:
Willow Tree is the Top-Notch React Native Mobile App Development Company in the USA & offering exceptional React Native service. They have the best team of developers who has an excellent knowledge of developing the most secure, robust & Powerful React Native Mobile Apps. From start-ups to enterprise organizations, Willow Tree has top-notch React Native App solutions that meet the needs of their clients.
Website: https://willowtreeapps.com/

9. MindGrub
MindGrub is a leading React Native Mobile App Development Company in the USA. Along with React Native, the company also works on other emerging technologies like robotics, augmented & virtual reality. The Company has excellent strength and the best developers team for any type of React Native mobile apps. They offer versatile React Native App development technology solutions to their clients.
Website: https://www.mindgrub.com/

10. Prismetric
Prismetric is the premium React Native Mobile App Development Company in the USA. They provide fast React Native Development Services and their React Native App Developers have a high capability of serving projects on various platforms. They focus on developing customized solutions for specific business requirements. Being a popular name in the React Native development market, Prismetric has accumulated a specialty in offering these services.
Website: https://www.prismetric.com/

#top rated react native app development companies in usa #top 10 react native app development companies in usa #top react native app development companies in usa #react native app development technologies #react native app development #hire top react native app developers in usa

Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1595059664

How long does it take to develop/build an app?

With more of us using smartphones, the popularity of mobile applications has exploded. In the digital era, the number of people looking for products and services online is growing rapidly. Smartphone owners look for mobile applications that give them quick access to companies’ products and services. As a result, mobile apps provide customers with a lot of benefits in just one device.

Likewise, companies use mobile apps to increase customer loyalty and improve their services. Mobile Developers are in high demand as companies use apps not only to create brand awareness but also to gather information. For that reason, mobile apps are used as tools to collect valuable data from customers to help companies improve their offer.

There are many types of mobile applications, each with its own advantages. For example, native apps perform better, while web apps don’t need to be customized for the platform or operating system (OS). Likewise, hybrid apps provide users with comfortable user experience. However, you may be wondering how long it takes to develop an app.

To give you an idea of how long the app development process takes, here’s a short guide.

App Idea & Research

app-idea-research

_Average time spent: two to five weeks _

This is the initial stage and a crucial step in setting the project in the right direction. In this stage, you brainstorm ideas and select the best one. Apart from that, you’ll need to do some research to see if your idea is viable. Remember that coming up with an idea is easy; the hard part is to make it a reality.

All your ideas may seem viable, but you still have to run some tests to keep it as real as possible. For that reason, when Web Developers are building a web app, they analyze the available ideas to see which one is the best match for the targeted audience.

Targeting the right audience is crucial when you are developing an app. It saves time when shaping the app in the right direction as you have a clear set of objectives. Likewise, analyzing how the app affects the market is essential. During the research process, App Developers must gather information about potential competitors and threats. This helps the app owners develop strategies to tackle difficulties that come up after the launch.

The research process can take several weeks, but it determines how successful your app can be. For that reason, you must take your time to know all the weaknesses and strengths of the competitors, possible app strategies, and targeted audience.

The outcomes of this stage are app prototypes and the minimum feasible product.

#android app #frontend #ios app #minimum viable product (mvp) #mobile app development #web development #android app development #app development #app development for ios and android #app development process #ios and android app development #ios app development #stages in app development

An API-First Approach For Designing Restful APIs | Hacker Noon

I’ve been working with Restful APIs for some time now and one thing that I love to do is to talk about APIs.

So, today I will show you how to build an API using the API-First approach and Design First with OpenAPI Specification.

First thing first, if you don’t know what’s an API-First approach means, it would be nice you stop reading this and check the blog post that I wrote to the Farfetchs blog where I explain everything that you need to know to start an API using API-First.

Preparing the ground

Before you get your hands dirty, let’s prepare the ground and understand the use case that will be developed.

Tools

If you desire to reproduce the examples that will be shown here, you will need some of those items below.

  • NodeJS
  • OpenAPI Specification
  • Text Editor (I’ll use VSCode)
  • Command Line

Use Case

To keep easy to understand, let’s use the Todo List App, it is a very common concept beyond the software development community.

#api #rest-api #openai #api-first-development #api-design #apis #restful-apis #restful-api

Juned Ghanchi

1621573085

React Native App Developers India, React Native App Development Company

Expand your user base by using react-native apps developed by our expert team for various platforms like Android, Android TV, iOS, macOS, tvOS, the Web, Windows, and UWP.

We help businesses to scale up the process and achieve greater performance by providing the best react native app development services. Our skilled and experienced team’s apps have delivered all the expected results for our clients across the world.

To achieve growth for your business, hire react native app developers in India. You can count on us for all the technical services and support.

#react native app development company india #react native app developers india #hire react native developers india #react native app development company #react native app developers #hire react native developers