Angela  Dickens

Angela Dickens

1598568420

Issues, Challenges and Architectural Orthodoxy

I lead a team of immensely talented engineers maintaining a critical application that is at the nucleus of my organization’s IT map. The advantage of being in such a team is the fact that you get to gauge the impact of your changes by looking at the effect it has on other teams and consumers. A major disadvantage, if you have not already guessed, is this same dependency and the pressure it brings along and a very thin margin for error. The application that my team manages used to be a large monolith and had a single source of non-replicable data, with the downstream systems being tightly coupled to this. Breaking this down into a host of microservices was a colossal undertaking. But that would be a story for yet another fewer-meetings day.

Fast forward to a time when we are managing a suite of 60 odd, loosely coupled, context bound microservices. But effortless deployments were still a challenge that we had not fully won over. We were still relying on after-business hours releases, redundant release definitions and complex release cycles. With a super agile team and a massively dynamic workitem backlog, the need to come up with a way to upgrade our deployments was well overdue. Along with the team, I came up with a couple of options and chose to organically revamp the whole system. Putting together the details of this exercise in one place would be gross over-simplification. Here is my first attempt at doing that.

Blue/Green

Why?

We started with simple resource swap deployments. Where new production resources are tested on a set of servers prior to swapping the resources out in production. This process is popularly known as _Blue/Green _deployments. For those who are unfamiliar with this, essentially there are two exact copies of the application’s source code, designated “Blue” and “Green” respectively (not exactly sure why those two colors). And we started seeing really good results with this approach, pretty early on.

Image for post

#observation #canary-deployments #devops #deployment

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Issues, Challenges and Architectural Orthodoxy
Were  Joyce

Were Joyce

1642110180

Spring: A Static Web Site Generator Written By GitHub Issues

Spring

Spring is a blog engine written by GitHub Issues, or is a simple, static web site generator. No more server and database, you can setup it in free hosting with GitHub Pages as a repository, then post the blogs in the repository Issues.

You can add some labels in your repository Issues as the blog category, and create Issues for writing blog content through Markdown.

Spring has responsive templates, looking good on mobile, tablet, and desktop.Gracefully degrading in older browsers. Compatible with Internet Explorer 10+ and all modern browsers.

Get up and running in seconds.

中文介绍

Quick start guide

For the impatient, here's how to get a Spring blog site up and running.

First of all

  • Fork the Spring repository as yours.
  • Goto your repository settings page to rename Repository Name.
  • Hosted directly on GitHub Pages from your project repository, you can take it as User or organization site or Project site(create a gh-pages branch).
  • Also, you can set up a custom domain with Pages.

Secondly

  • Open the index.html file to edit the config variables with yours below.
$.extend(spring.config, {
  // my blog title
  title: 'Spring',
  // my blog description
  desc: "A blog engine written by github issues [Fork me on GitHub](https://github.com/zhaoda/spring)",
  // my github username
  owner: 'zhaoda',
  // creator's username
  creator: 'zhaoda',
  // the repository name on github for writting issues
  repo: 'spring',
  // custom page
  pages: [
  ]
})
  • Put your domain into the CNAME file if you have.
  • Commit your change and push it.

And then

  • Goto your repository settings page to turn on the Issues feature.
  • Browser this repository's issues page, like this https://github.com/your-username/your-repo-name/issues?state=open.
  • Click the New Issue button to just write some content as a new one blog.

Finally

  • Browser this repository's GitHub Pages url, like this http://your-username.github.io/your-repo-name, you will see your Spring blog, have a test.
  • And you're done!

Custom development

Installation

  • You will need a web server installed on your system, for example, Nginx, Apache etc.
  • Configure your spring project to your local web server directory.
  • Run and browser it, like http://localhost/spring/dev.html .
  • dev.html is used to develop, index.html is used to runtime.

Folder Structure

spring/
├── css/
|    ├── boot.less  #import other less files
|    ├── github.less  #github highlight style
|    ├── home.less  #home page style
|    ├── issuelist.less #issue list widget style
|    ├── issues.less #issues page style
|    ├── labels.less #labels page style
|    ├── main.less #commo style
|    ├── markdown.less #markdown format style
|    ├── menu.less #menu panel style
|    ├── normalize.less #normalize style
|    ├── pull2refresh.less #pull2refresh widget style
|    └── side.html  #side panel style
├── dist/
|    ├── main.min.css  #css for runtime
|    └── main.min.js  #js for runtime
├── img/  #some icon, startup images
├── js/
|    ├── lib/  #some js librarys need to use
|    ├── boot.js  #boot
|    ├── home.js  #home page
|    ├── issuelist.js #issue list widget
|    ├── issues.js #issues page
|    ├── labels.js #labels page
|    ├── menu.js #menu panel
|    ├── pull2refresh.less #pull2refresh widget
|    └── side.html  #side panel
├── css/
|    ├── boot.less  #import other less files
|    ├── github.less  #github highlight style
|    ├── home.less  #home page style
|    ├── issuelist.less #issue list widget style
|    ├── issues.less #issues page style
|    ├── labels.less #labels page style
|    ├── main.less #commo style
|    ├── markdown.less #markdown format style
|    ├── menu.less #menu panel style
|    ├── normalize.less #normalize style
|    ├── pull2refresh.less #pull2refresh widget style
|    └── side.html  #side panel style
├── dev.html #used to develop
├── favicon.ico #website icon
├── Gruntfile.js #Grunt task config
├── index.html #used to runtime
└── package.json  #nodejs install config

Customization

  • Browser http://localhost/spring/dev.html, enter the development mode.
  • Changes you want to modify the source code, like css, js etc.
  • Refresh dev.html view change.

Building

  • You will need Node.js installed on your system.
  • Installation package.
bash

$ npm install

*   Run grunt task.

    ```bash
$ grunt
  • Browser http://localhost/spring/index.html, enter the runtime mode.
  • If there is no problem, commit and push the code.
  • Don't forget to merge master branch into gh-pages branch if you have.
  • And you're done! Good luck!

Report a bug

Who used

If you are using, please tell me.

Download Details:
Author: zhaoda
Source Code: https://github.com/zhaoda/spring
License: MIT License

#spring #spring-framework #spring-boot #java 

Serverless Vs Microservices Architecture - A Deep Dive

Companies need to be thinking long-term before even starting a software development project. These needs are solved at the level of architecture: business owners want to assure agility, scalability, and performance.

The top contenders for scalable solutions are serverless and microservices. Both architectures prioritize security but approach it in their own ways. Let’s take a look at how businesses can benefit from the adoption of serverless architecture vs microservices, examine their differences, advantages, and use cases.

#serverless #microservices #architecture #software-architecture #serverless-architecture #microservice-architecture #serverless-vs-microservices #hackernoon-top-story

Mireille  Von

Mireille Von

1633165200

Find Out What Your Architecture and System Design Challenge Is

In this lesson, you'll Find Out What Your Architecture and System Design Challenge Is

Challenge Link: https://github.com/TechPrimers/whats-your-architecture
#challenge  #architecture  

Lisa joly

Lisa joly

1623994363

5 Challenges Of Big Data Analytics in 2021

2021 is around the corner. Time to deep dive through the most typical big data analytics issues, investigate possible root causes, and highlight the potential solutions to those.

It’s always better to think smart from the very beginning when your big data analytics system is yet at the concept stage. Any fixes might be quite expensive to implement once the system is already up and running.

In today’s digital world, companies embrace big data business analytics to improve decision-making, increase accountability, raise productivity, make better predictions, monitor performance, and gain a competitive advantage. However, many organizations have problems using business intelligence analytics on a strategic level. According to Gartner, 87% of companies have low BI (business intelligence) and analytics maturity, lacking data guidance and support. The problems with business data analysis are not only related to analytics by itself, but can also be caused by deep system or infrastructure problems.

#big data #latest news #5 challenges of big data analytics in 2021 #challenges #challenges

Fannie  Zemlak

Fannie Zemlak

1595927640

Road to Simplicity: Hexagonal Architecture [Part One]

Software writing taught me that: a well written software is a simple software.

So I started to think how to achieve simplicity in a methodological

way. This is the first story of a series about this methodology.

Naturally it’s a snapshot because it’s in constant evolution.

Simplicity

A definition of simplicity is:

The quality or condition of being easy to understand or do.

Oxford dictionary (https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/simplicity)

So, a simple software is a software that is easy to understand.

After all software are written by humans for humans. This implies

that they should be understandable. Simplicity guarantees that its

understandability isn’t an intellectual pain.

A software solves a problem. So to build the former you should understand the latter.

But to build a simple software you should understand - clearly - a problem.

First step: architecture

On the Martin Fowler blog there is a deep definition of architecture and its explanation:

“Architecture is about the important stuff. Whatever that is.”

On first blush, that sounds trite, but I find it carries a lot of richness.

It means that the heart of thinking architecturally about software is to decide what is important, (i.e. what is architectural), and then expend energy on keeping those architectural elements in good condition.

Ultimately the important stuffs are about the solved problem. In other words about the software domain.

So we need an architecture that allows us to express - clearly - the software domain.

I think that the hexagonal architecture (a.k.a. ports and adapter architecture) is an ideal candidate.

It’s based on layered architecture, so the outer layer depends on the inner layer. Each layer is represented as a hexagon.

Here a UML-like diagram to express the below concepts:

In this architecture the innermost hexagon is dedicated to the

software domain. Here we define domain objects and we express clearly:

  • what the domain does as input port or use case (I prefer the latter because expressiveness).
  • what the domain need, to fulfill use cases, as output port.

Conceptually on the sides of the domain layer there are use case and output port interfaces.

The communication between the outer layers and the domain layer happens through these interfaces.

The outer layer provides output port implementations and they use the use case interfaces.

The implementations and use case clients are are called adapter. Because they adapt our interface to a specific technology.

This relation is an instance of the dependency inversion principle. Simply put: high level concept, the domain, doesn’t rely on a specific

technology. Instead low level concept depends upon high level concept.

In other words our code is technology agnostic.

As you can see the concepts expressed in the outer layers are just details.

The real important stuff, the domain, is isolated and expressed clearly.

Code

A little project accompanies this series to show this methodology. It’s written in Java with the reactive paradigm from the beginning. For this reason the ReactiveX library is also used in the domain layer.

The software analyzes the capabilities (e.g. the java version, the

network speed and so on) of the machine and it exposes them through REST API.

It’s inspired by a real world software that I wrote because of work.

The first step is to define the innermost hexagon.

We can already identify:

  • the main use case, expressed as GetCapabilitiesUseCase
  • the object that describe the machine capabilities, expressed as Capabilities

The use case is an interface:

(if you never used ReactiveX: a Single means that the method will return asynchronously an object or an error)

public interface GetCapabilitiesUseCase {
  Single<Capabilities> getCapabilities();
}

The Capabilities objects are immutable (precisely they’re value objects). And there is an associated builder (I’m using lombok annotations to generate the code):

@RequiredArgsConstructor
@Value
@Builder
public class Capabilities {
  private final String javaVersion;
  private final Long networkSpeed;
}

#architecture #software-architecture #programming #java #hexagonal-architecture #reactive-programming #software-development #software-engineering