Tamale  Moses

Tamale Moses

1640196000

Vim Client for TabNine

Tabnine - AI Code Completion

tl;dr jump to installation section

Tabnine is an AI-powered code completion extension trusted by millions of developers around the world. Whether you’re just getting started as a developer or if you’ve been doing it for decades, Tabnine will help you code twice as fast with half the keystrokes – all in your favorite IDE.

The Right Tool for The Job

Whether you call it IntelliSense, intelliCode, autocomplete, AI-assisted code completion, AI-powered code completion, AI copilot, AI code snippets, code suggestion, code prediction, code hinting, or content assist, you probably already know that it can save you tons of time, easily cutting your keystrokes in half.

Powered by sophisticated machine learning models trained on billions of lines of trusted Open Source code from GitHub, Tabnine is the most advanced AI-powered code completion copilot available today. And like GitHub, it is an essential tool for professional developers.

With and without Tabnine Java

Tabnine works with all major programming languages including:

PythonJavascriptJava
extended JSReactPHP
TypescriptC HeaderBash
MLSwiftRuby
PerlRustSQL
VueF#Scala
JuliaTOMLShell
YMALC / C++/ C#HTML
LuaMarkdownHaskell
GoObjective CJSON
CSS / SCSSAngularKotlin

Our Vision

Knowing that most of the code generated today has been created before begs the question - what if developers didn’t need to remember it, search for it, and type it again?

Learning from the past, focusing on the future, that’s the bedrock Tabnine is built on. Our AI-powered code completion tool embodies that vision by harnessing the collective achievements of every qualified piece of open source code ever written and serving that knowledge to our users in the form of code completion suggestions. As we move forward, Tabnine’s AI will play a valuable role in shaping the entire software development lifecycle.

Tabnine’s AI studies mountains of publicly available open source code and combines that with knowledge of your specific project and preferences creating code suggestions customized just for you. That saves you tons of keystrokes, and tons of time, all while keeping you aligned with best practices, and avoiding frustrating typos.

Pick the Plan that Works Best for You!

Tabnine Basic Tabnine’s Basic AI-powered code completion model is a fantastic time-saving tool for any developer. The Basic plan has plenty of free daily code completion suggestions to get you started, with no cost, no credit card, and no commitment.

Tabnine Pro Supercharge your AI code completion suggestions with our advanced ML model, unlock unlimited code suggestions, customize your experience, and get priority support. Experience the power of Tabnine Pro today!

Installation

Tabnine plugs into the following completion engines:

  • YouCompleteMe
  • coc.nvim
  • completion-nvim
  • nvim-cmp
  • deoplete.nvim
  • ddc.vim
  • nvim-compe

Not using any of the above?

  • If your completion engine is not supported - file a feature request.
  • If you don't use any completion engine - it's recommended that you follow the YouCompleteMe installation instructions.

YouCompleteMe

Tabnine supports YouCompleteMe through a fork. Follow the instructions here: https://github.com/tabnine/YouCompleteMe#installation

coc.nvim

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/neoclide/coc-tabnine

completion-nvim

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/aca/completion-tabnine#install

nvim-cmp

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/tzachar/cmp-tabnine

deoplete.nvim

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/tbodt/deoplete-tabnine

ddc.vim

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/LumaKernel/ddc-tabnine

nvim-compe

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/tzachar/compe-tabnine

Investing In Our Community

FREE Tabnine Student Plan We know that tuition, books, rent, and food can get crazy expensive, that’s why Tabnine helps support the community and the dev superstars of tomorrow with a 100% free Tabnine Student license with all our Pro perks renewable for as long as you are a student.

Join the Tabnine Student Program for free

FAQ

Got a question? We’ve got the answer - Check out our FAQ page

Tabnine Support

Having some trouble with installation? Something not working the way you hoped? Tabnine Support is always happy to help. Feel free to contact us anytime at support@tabnine.com

Privacy

Your privacy is paramount, that’s why Tabnine uses a dual model design. While the public GPT-2 model works its magic continuously scanning hundreds of millions of trusted open source parameters, a second separate model runs locally on your machine keeping your code 100% private.

In addition, the local model focuses on learning your personal and project coding preferences, constantly improving the quality and accuracy of your code suggestions. Always separate. Always secure. Always private.

Find out more about how we keep your code private here

Tabnine Hub

A quick click on Tabnine on your IDE status bar takes you directly to your Tabnine Hub where you can easily update and manage all your account options and customize your suggestion preferences.

Usage

Tabnine is a textual autocomplete extension. When you type a specific string in your editor, you will be shown the Tabnine completion dialog box with suggestions for completing the code you’ve begun typing.

Deep Completion

Deep Tabnine is trained on millions of files from GitHub. During training, Tabnine’s goal is to predict the next token given the tokens that came before. To achieve this goal, Tabnine learns complex behavior, such as type inference in dynamically typed languages.

Deep Tabnine can use subtle clues that are difficult for traditional tools to access. For example, the return type of app.get_user() is assumed to be an object with setter methods, while the return type of app.get_users() is assumed to be a list.

Deep Tabnine is based on GPT-2, which uses the Transformers Network Architecture. This architecture was first developed to solve problems in natural language processing. Although modeling code and modeling natural language might appear to be unrelated tasks, modeling code requires understanding English in some unexpected ways.

  • Tabnine Indexes your entire project and determines which files to ignore by reading your .gitignore
  • Tabnine cuts your number of keystrokes in half and eliminates unnecessary typos
  • Tabnine works right out of the box ensuring frictionless installation and configuration
  • Tabnine offers code completion suggestions in less than 10 milliseconds

Commuinities

Recommended by developers everywhere:

William Candillon Tweet Imed Boumalek Tweet ramnivas Tweet bob paskar Tweet Nick Radford Tweet Hugues BR Tweet JohnyTheCarrot Tweet Donald E Fredrick Tweet Joshua Kelly Tweet JDerek Braid Tweet

Note:


A note on licensing: this repo includes source code as well as packaged Tabnine binaries. The MIT license only applies to the source code, not the binaries. The binaries are covered by the Tabnine Terms of Use.


The Vim client for Tabnine is adapted from YouCompleteMe. This client is an incompatible fork of YouCompleteMe, so please do not contact the YCM maintainers regarding any problems with it. Instead, create an issue in this repository.

Author: codota
Source Code: https://github.com/codota/tabnine-vim
License: GPL-3.0 License

#vim 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Vim Client for TabNine
Vincent Lab

Vincent Lab

1605176204

Why I Think You Should Learn Vim as a Developer

In this video, I’ll be showing you why I think it’s good to know Vim as a Developer.

#vim #vim editor #text editor #what is vim #speed,2x dev #vim for node.js

YouCompleteMe: A Code Completion Engine for Vim

YouCompleteMe: a code-completion engine for Vim

Help, Advice, Support

Looking for help, advice or support? Having problems getting YCM to work?

First carefully read the installation instructions for your OS. We recommend you use the supplied install.py - the "full" installation guide is for rare, advanced use cases and most users should use install.py.

If the server isn't starting and you're getting a "YouCompleteMe unavailable" error, check the Troubleshooting guide.

Next check the User Guide section on the semantic completer that you are using. For C/C++/Objective-C/Objective-C++/CUDA, you must read this section.

Finally, check the FAQ.

If, after reading the installation and user guides, and checking the FAQ, you're still having trouble, check the contacts section below for how to get in touch.

Please do NOT go to #vim on Freenode for support. Please contact the YouCompleteMe maintainers directly using the contact details below.

Intro

YouCompleteMe is a fast, as-you-type, fuzzy-search code completion, comprehension and refactoring engine for Vim.

It has several completion engines built in and supports any protocol-compliant Language Server, so can work with practically any language. YouCompleteMe contains:

  • an identifier-based engine that works with every programming language,
  • a powerful clangd-based engine that provides native semantic code completion for C/C++/Objective-C/Objective-C++/CUDA (from now on referred to as "the C-family languages"),
  • a Jedi-based completion engine for Python 2 and 3,
  • an OmniSharp-Roslyn-based completion engine for C#,
  • a Gopls-based completion engine for Go,
  • a TSServer-based completion engine for JavaScript and TypeScript,
  • a rust-analyzer-based completion engine for Rust,
  • a jdt.ls-based completion engine for Java.
  • a generic Language Server Protocol implementation for any language
  • and an omnifunc-based completer that uses data from Vim's omnicomplete system to provide semantic completions for many other languages (Ruby, PHP etc.).

YouCompleteMe GIF completion demo

Here's an explanation of what happens in the last GIF demo above.

First, realize that no keyboard shortcuts had to be pressed to get the list of completion candidates at any point in the demo. The user just types and the suggestions pop up by themselves. If the user doesn't find the completion suggestions relevant and/or just wants to type, they can do so; the completion engine will not interfere.

When the user sees a useful completion string being offered, they press the TAB key to accept it. This inserts the completion string. Repeated presses of the TAB key cycle through the offered completions.

If the offered completions are not relevant enough, the user can continue typing to further filter out unwanted completions.

A critical thing to notice is that the completion filtering is NOT based on the input being a string prefix of the completion (but that works too). The input needs to be a subsequence match of a completion. This is a fancy way of saying that any input characters need to be present in a completion string in the order in which they appear in the input. So abc is a subsequence of xaybgc, but not of xbyxaxxc. After the filter, a complicated sorting system ranks the completion strings so that the most relevant ones rise to the top of the menu (so you usually need to press TAB just once).

All of the above works with any programming language because of the identifier-based completion engine. It collects all of the identifiers in the current file and other files you visit (and your tags files) and searches them when you type (identifiers are put into per-filetype groups).

The demo also shows the semantic engine in use. When the user presses ., -> or :: while typing in insert mode (for C++; different triggers are used for other languages), the semantic engine is triggered (it can also be triggered with a keyboard shortcut; see the rest of the docs).

The last thing that you can see in the demo is YCM's diagnostic display features (the little red X that shows up in the left gutter; inspired by Syntastic) if you are editing a C-family file. As the completer engine compiles your file and detects warnings or errors, they will be presented in various ways. You don't need to save your file or press any keyboard shortcut to trigger this, it "just happens" in the background.

And that's not all...

YCM might be the only vim completion engine with the correct Unicode support. Though we do assume UTF-8 everywhere.

YouCompleteMe GIF unicode demo

YCM also provides semantic IDE-like features in a number of languages, including:

For example, here's a demo of signature help:

Signature Help Early Demo

Below we can see YCM being able to do a few things:

  • Retrieve references across files
  • Go to declaration/definition
  • Expand auto in C++
  • Fix some common errors with FixIt
  • Not shown in the GIF is GoToImplementation and GoToType for servers that support it.

YouCompleteMe GIF subcommands demo

And here's some documentation being shown in a hover popup, automatically and manually:

hover demo

Features vary by file type, so make sure to check out the file type feature summary and the full list of completer subcommands to find out what's available for your favourite languages.

You'll also find that YCM has filepath completers (try typing ./ in a file) and a completer that integrates with UltiSnips.

Installation

Requirements

Supported Vim Versions

Our policy is to support the Vim version that's in the latest LTS of Ubuntu. That's currently Ubuntu 20.04 which contains vim-nox at v8.1.2269.

Vim must have a working Python 3.6 runtime, compiled with --enable-shared (or --enable-framework). You can check with :py3 import sys; print( sys.version ).

For Neovim users, our policy is to require the latest released version. Currently, Neovim 0.5.0 is required. Please note that some features are not available in Neovim, and Neovim is not officially supported.

Supported Compilers

In order to provide the best possible performance and stability, ycmd has updated its code to C++17. This requires a version bump of the minimum supported compilers. The new requirements are:

CompilerCurrent Min
GCC8
Clang7
MSVC15.7 (VS 2017)

YCM requires CMake 3.13 or greater. If your CMake is too old, you may be able to simply pip install --user cmake to get a really new version.

Individual completer requirements

When enabling language support for a particular language, there may be runtime requirements, such as needing Java Development Kit for Java support. In general, YCM is not in control of the required versions for the downstream compilers, though we do our best to signal where we know them.

macOS

Quick start, installing all completers

  • Install YCM plugin via Vundle
  • Install CMake, MacVim and Python 3; Note that the pre-installed macOS system vim is not supported (due to it having broken Python integration).
$ brew install cmake python go nodejs

Install mono from Mono Project (NOTE: on Intel Macs you can also brew install mono. On arm Macs, you may require Rosetta)

For java support you must install a JDK, one way to do this is with Homebrew:

$ brew install java
$ sudo ln -sfn $(brew --prefix java)/libexec/openjdk.jdk /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/openjdk.jdk

Pre-installed macOS system Vim does not support Python 3. So you need to install either a Vim that supports Python 3 OR MacVim with Homebrew:

  • Option 1: Installing a Vim that supports Python 3
brew install vim
brew install macvim

Compile YCM.

For Intel and arm64 Macs, the bundled libclang/clangd work:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python3 install.py --all

If you have troubles with finding system frameworks or C++ standard library, try using the homebrew llvm:

brew install llvm
cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python3 install.py --system-libclang --all

And edit your vimrc to add the following line to use the Homebrew llvm's clangd:

" Use homebrew's clangd
let g:ycm_clangd_binary_path = trim(system('brew --prefix llvm')).'/bin/clangd'

For using an arbitrary LSP server, check the relevant section

Explanation for the quick start

These instructions (using install.py) are the quickest way to install YouCompleteMe, however they may not work for everyone. If the following instructions don't work for you, check out the full installation guide.

A supported Vim version with Python 3 is required. MacVim is a good option, even if you only use the terminal. YCM won't work with the pre-installed Vim from Apple as its Python support is broken. If you don't already use a Vim that supports Python 3 or MacVim, install it with Homebrew. Install CMake as well:

brew install vim cmake     

OR

brew install macvim cmake

Install YouCompleteMe with Vundle.

Remember: YCM is a plugin with a compiled component. If you update YCM using Vundle and the ycm_core library APIs have changed (happens rarely), YCM will notify you to recompile it. You should then rerun the install process.

NOTE: If you want C-family completion, you MUST have the latest Xcode installed along with the latest Command Line Tools (they are installed automatically when you run clang for the first time, or manually by running xcode-select --install)

Compiling YCM with semantic support for C-family languages through clangd:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
./install.py --clangd-completer

Compiling YCM without semantic support for C-family languages:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
./install.py

The following additional language support options are available:

  • C# support: install by downloading the Mono macOS package and add --cs-completer when calling install.py.
  • Go support: install Go and add --go-completer when calling install.py.
  • JavaScript and TypeScript support: install Node.js and npm and add --ts-completer when calling install.py.
  • Rust support: add --rust-completer when calling install.py.
  • Java support: install JDK and add --java-completer when calling install.py.

To simply compile with everything enabled, there's a --all flag. So, to install with all language features, ensure xbuild, go, node and npm tools are installed and in your PATH, then simply run:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
./install.py --all

That's it. You're done. Refer to the User Guide section on how to use YCM. Don't forget that if you want the C-family semantic completion engine to work, you will need to provide the compilation flags for your project to YCM. It's all in the User Guide.

YCM comes with sane defaults for its options, but you still may want to take a look at what's available for configuration. There are a few interesting options that are conservatively turned off by default that you may want to turn on.

Linux 64-bit

The following assume you're using Ubuntu 20.04.

Quick start, installing all completers

  • Install YCM plugin via Vundle
  • Install CMake, Vim and Python
apt install build-essential cmake vim-nox python3-dev
  • Install mono-complete, go, node, java and npm
apt install mono-complete golang nodejs default-jdk npm
  • Compile YCM
cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python3 install.py --all

Explanation for the quick start

These instructions (using install.py) are the quickest way to install YouCompleteMe, however they may not work for everyone. If the following instructions don't work for you, check out the full installation guide.

Make sure you have a supported version of Vim with Python 3 support, and a supported compiler. The latest LTS of Ubuntu is the minimum platform for simple installation. For earlier releases or other distributions, you may have to do some work to acquire the dependencies.

If your vim version is too old, you may need to compile Vim from source (don't worry, it's easy).

Install YouCompleteMe with Vundle.

Remember: YCM is a plugin with a compiled component. If you update YCM using Vundle and the ycm_core library APIs have changed (happens rarely), YCM will notify you to recompile it. You should then rerun the install process.

Install development tools, CMake, and Python headers:

  • Fedora-like distributions:
sudo dnf install cmake gcc-c++ make python3-devel
  • Ubuntu LTS:
sudo apt install build-essential cmake3 python3-dev

Compiling YCM with semantic support for C-family languages through clangd:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python3 install.py --clangd-completer

Compiling YCM without semantic support for C-family languages:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python3 install.py

The following additional language support options are available:

  • C# support: install Mono and add --cs-completer when calling install.py.
  • Go support: install Go and add --go-completer when calling install.py.
  • JavaScript and TypeScript support: install Node.js and npm and add --ts-completer when calling install.py.
  • Rust support: add --rust-completer when calling install.py.
  • Java support: install JDK and add --java-completer when calling install.py.

To simply compile with everything enabled, there's a --all flag. So, to install with all language features, ensure xbuild, go, node and npm tools are installed and in your PATH, then simply run:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python3 install.py --all

That's it. You're done. Refer to the User Guide section on how to use YCM. Don't forget that if you want the C-family semantic completion engine to work, you will need to provide the compilation flags for your project to YCM. It's all in the User Guide.

YCM comes with sane defaults for its options, but you still may want to take a look at what's available for configuration. There are a few interesting options that are conservatively turned off by default that you may want to turn on.

Windows

Quick start, installing all completers

cd YouCompleteMe
python3 install.py --all

Explanation for the quick start

These instructions (using install.py) are the quickest way to install YouCompleteMe, however they may not work for everyone. If the following instructions don't work for you, check out the full installation guide.

Important: we assume that you are using the cmd.exe command prompt and that you know how to add an executable to the PATH environment variable.

Make sure you have a supported Vim version with Python 3 support. You can check the version and which Python is supported by typing :version inside Vim. Look at the features included: +python3/dyn for Python 3. Take note of the Vim architecture, i.e. 32 or 64-bit. It will be important when choosing the Python installer. We recommend using a 64-bit client. Daily updated installers of 32-bit and 64-bit Vim with Python 3 support are available.

Add the following line to your vimrc if not already present.:

set encoding=utf-8

This option is required by YCM. Note that it does not prevent you from editing a file in another encoding than UTF-8. You can do that by specifying the ++enc argument to the :e command.

Install YouCompleteMe with Vundle.

Remember: YCM is a plugin with a compiled component. If you update YCM using Vundle and the ycm_core library APIs have changed (happens rarely), YCM will notify you to recompile it. You should then rerun the install process.

Download and install the following software:

  • Python 3. Be sure to pick the version corresponding to your Vim architecture. It is Windows x86 for a 32-bit Vim and Windows x86-64 for a 64-bit Vim. We recommend installing Python 3. Additionally, the version of Python you install must match up exactly with the version of Python that Vim is looking for. Type :version and look at the bottom of the page at the list of compiler flags. Look for flags that look similar to -DDYNAMIC_PYTHON3_DLL=\"python36.dll\". This indicates that Vim is looking for Python 3.6. You'll need one or the other installed, matching the version number exactly.
  • CMake. Add CMake executable to the PATH environment variable.
  • Build Tools for Visual Studio 2019. During setup, select C++ build tools in Workloads.

Compiling YCM with semantic support for C-family languages through clangd:

cd %USERPROFILE%/vimfiles/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python install.py --clangd-completer

Compiling YCM without semantic support for C-family languages:

cd %USERPROFILE%/vimfiles/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python install.py

The following additional language support options are available:

  • C# support: add --cs-completer when calling install.py. Be sure that the build utility msbuild is in your PATH.
  • Go support: install Go and add --go-completer when calling install.py.
  • JavaScript and TypeScript support: install Node.js and npm and add --ts-completer when calling install.py.
  • Rust support: add --rust-completer when calling install.py.
  • Java support: install JDK and add --java-completer when calling install.py.

To simply compile with everything enabled, there's a --all flag. So, to install with all language features, ensure msbuild, go, node and npm tools are installed and in your PATH, then simply run:

cd %USERPROFILE%/vimfiles/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python install.py --all

You can specify the Microsoft Visual C++ (MSVC) version using the --msvc option. YCM officially supports MSVC 15 (2017), MSVC 16 (Visual Studio 2019) and MSVC 17 (Visual Studio 17 2022).

That's it. You're done. Refer to the User Guide section on how to use YCM. Don't forget that if you want the C-family semantic completion engine to work, you will need to provide the compilation flags for your project to YCM. It's all in the User Guide.

YCM comes with sane defaults for its options, but you still may want to take a look at what's available for configuration. There are a few interesting options that are conservatively turned off by default that you may want to turn on.

FreeBSD/OpenBSD

Quick start, installing all completers

  • Install YCM plugin via Vundle
  • Install CMake
pkg install cmake
  • Install xbuild, go, node and npm
  • Compile YCM
cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
python3 install.py --all

Explanation for the quick start

These instructions (using install.py) are the quickest way to install YouCompleteMe, however they may not work for everyone. If the following instructions don't work for you, check out the full installation guide.

NOTE: OpenBSD / FreeBSD are not officially supported platforms by YCM.

Make sure you have a supported Vim version with Python 3 support, and a supported compiler and CMake, perhaps:

pkg install cmake

Install YouCompleteMe with Vundle.

Remember: YCM is a plugin with a compiled component. If you update YCM using Vundle and the ycm_core library APIs have changed (happens rarely), YCM will notify you to recompile it. You should then rerun the install process.

Compiling YCM with semantic support for C-family languages through clangd:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
./install.py --clangd-completer

Compiling YCM without semantic support for C-family languages:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
./install.py

If the python executable is not present, or the default python is not the one that should be compiled against, specify the python interpreter explicitly:

python3 install.py --clangd-completer

The following additional language support options are available:

  • C# support: install Mono and add --cs-completer when calling ./install.py.
  • Go support: install Go and add --go-completer when calling ./install.py.
  • JavaScript and TypeScript support: install Node.js and npm and add --ts-completer when calling install.py.
  • Rust support: add --rust-completer when calling ./install.py.
  • Java support: install JDK and add --java-completer when calling ./install.py.

To simply compile with everything enabled, there's a --all flag. So, to install with all language features, ensure xbuild, go, node and npm tools are installed and in your PATH, then simply run:

cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe
./install.py --all

That's it. You're done. Refer to the User Guide section on how to use YCM. Don't forget that if you want the C-family semantic completion engine to work, you will need to provide the compilation flags for your project to YCM. It's all in the User Guide.

YCM comes with sane defaults for its options, but you still may want to take a look at what's available for configuration. There are a few interesting options that are conservatively turned off by default that you may want to turn on.

Full Installation Guide

The full installation guide has been moved to the wiki.

Quick Feature Summary

General (all languages)

  • Super-fast identifier completer including tags files and syntax elements
  • Intelligent suggestion ranking and filtering
  • File and path suggestions
  • Suggestions from Vim's omnifunc
  • UltiSnips snippet suggestions

C-family languages (C, C++, Objective C, Objective C++, CUDA)

  • Semantic auto-completion with automatic fixes
  • Signature help
  • Real-time diagnostic display
  • Go to include/declaration/definition (GoTo, etc.)
  • Find Symbol (GoToSymbol), with interactive search
  • Document outline (GoToDocumentOutline), with interactive search
  • View documentation comments for identifiers (GetDoc)
  • Type information for identifiers (GetType)
  • Automatically fix certain errors (FixIt)
  • Reference finding (GoToReferences)
  • Renaming symbols (RefactorRename <new name>)
  • Code formatting (Format)

C♯

  • Semantic auto-completion
  • Signature help
  • Real-time diagnostic display
  • Go to declaration/definition (GoTo, etc.)
  • Go to implementation (GoToImplementation)
  • Find Symbol (GoToSymbol), with interactive search
  • View documentation comments for identifiers (GetDoc)
  • Type information for identifiers (GetType)
  • Automatically fix certain errors (FixIt)
  • Management of OmniSharp-Roslyn server instance
  • Renaming symbols (RefactorRename <new name>)
  • Code formatting (Format)

Python

  • Semantic auto-completion
  • Signature help
  • Go to definition (GoTo)
  • Find Symbol (GoToSymbol), with interactive search
  • Reference finding (GoToReferences)
  • View documentation comments for identifiers (GetDoc)
  • Type information for identifiers (GetType)
  • Renaming symbols (RefactorRename <new name>)

Go

  • Semantic auto-completion
  • Signature help
  • Real-time diagnostic display
  • Go to declaration/definition (GoTo, etc.)
  • Go to type definition (GoToType)
  • Go to implementation (GoToImplementation)
  • Document outline (GoToDocumentOutline), with interactive search
  • Automatically fix certain errors (FixIt)
  • View documentation comments for identifiers (GetDoc)
  • Type information for identifiers (GetType)
  • Code formatting (Format)
  • Management of gopls server instance

JavaScript and TypeScript

  • Semantic auto-completion with automatic import insertion
  • Signature help
  • Real-time diagnostic display
  • Go to definition (GoTo, GoToDefinition, and GoToDeclaration are identical)
  • Go to type definition (GoToType)
  • Go to implementation (GoToImplementation)
  • Find Symbol (GoToSymbol), with interactive search
  • Reference finding (GoToReferences)
  • View documentation comments for identifiers (GetDoc)
  • Type information for identifiers (GetType)
  • Automatically fix certain errors (FixIt)
  • Renaming symbols (RefactorRename <new name>)
  • Code formatting (Format)
  • Organize imports (OrganizeImports)
  • Management of TSServer server instance

Rust

  • Semantic auto-completion
  • Real-time diagnostic display
  • Go to declaration/definition (GoTo, etc.)
  • Go to implementation (GoToImplementation)
  • Reference finding (GoToReferences)
  • Document outline (GoToDocumentOutline), with interactive search
  • View documentation comments for identifiers (GetDoc)
  • Automatically fix certain errors (FixIt)
  • Type information for identifiers (GetType)
  • Renaming symbols (RefactorRename <new name>)
  • Code formatting (Format)
  • Management of rust-analyzer server instance

Java

  • Semantic auto-completion with automatic import insertion
  • Signature help
  • Real-time diagnostic display
  • Go to definition (GoTo, GoToDefinition, and GoToDeclaration are identical)
  • Go to type definition (GoToType)
  • Go to implementation (GoToImplementation)
  • Find Symbol (GoToSymbol), with interactive search
  • Reference finding (GoToReferences)
  • Document outline (GoToDocumentOutline), with interactive search
  • View documentation comments for identifiers (GetDoc)
  • Type information for identifiers (GetType)
  • Automatically fix certain errors including code generation (FixIt)
  • Renaming symbols (RefactorRename <new name>)
  • Code formatting (Format)
  • Organize imports (OrganizeImports)
  • Detection of java projects
  • Execute custom server command (ExecuteCommand <args>)
  • Management of jdt.ls server instance

User Guide

General Usage

If the offered completions are too broad, keep typing characters; YCM will continue refining the offered completions based on your input.

Filtering is "smart-case" and "smart-diacritic" sensitive; if you are typing only lowercase letters, then it's case-insensitive. If your input contains uppercase letters, then the uppercase letters in your query must match uppercase letters in the completion strings (the lowercase letters still match both). On top of that, a letter with no diacritic marks will match that letter with or without marks:

matchesfoofôofOofÔo
foo✔️✔️✔️✔️
fôo✔️✔️
fOo✔️✔️
fÔo✔️

Use the TAB key to accept a completion and continue pressing TAB to cycle through the completions. Use Shift-TAB to cycle backwards. Note that if you're using console Vim (that is, not gvim or MacVim) then it's likely that the Shift-TAB binding will not work because the console will not pass it to Vim. You can remap the keys; see the Options section below.

Knowing a little bit about how YCM works internally will prevent confusion. YCM has several completion engines: an identifier-based completer that collects all of the identifiers in the current file and other files you visit (and your tags files) and searches them when you type (identifiers are put into per-filetype groups).

There are also several semantic engines in YCM. There are libclang-based and clangd-based completers that provide semantic completion for C-family languages. There's a Jedi-based completer for semantic completion for Python. There's also an omnifunc-based completer that uses data from Vim's omnicomplete system to provide semantic completions when no native completer exists for that language in YCM.

There are also other completion engines, like the UltiSnips completer and the filepath completer.

YCM automatically detects which completion engine would be the best in any situation. On occasion, it queries several of them at once, merges the outputs and presents the results to you.

Client-Server Architecture

YCM has a client-server architecture; the Vim part of YCM is only a thin client that talks to the ycmd HTTP+JSON server that has the vast majority of YCM logic and functionality. The server is started and stopped automatically as you start and stop Vim.

Completion String Ranking

The subsequence filter removes any completions that do not match the input, but then the sorting system kicks in. It's actually very complicated and uses lots of factors, but suffice it to say that "word boundary" (WB) subsequence character matches are "worth" more than non-WB matches. In effect, this means given an input of "gua", the completion "getUserAccount" would be ranked higher in the list than the "Fooguxa" completion (both of which are subsequence matches). A word-boundary character are all capital characters, characters preceded by an underscore and the first letter character in the completion string.

Signature Help

Valid signatures are displayed in a second popup menu and the current signature is highlighted along with the current argument.

Signature help is triggered in insert mode automatically when g:ycm_auto_trigger is enabled and is not supported when it is not enabled.

The signatures popup is hidden when there are no matching signatures or when you leave insert mode. There is no key binding to clear the popup.

For more details on this feature and a few demos, check out the PR that proposed it.

Dismiss signature help

The signature help popup sometimes gets in the way. You can toggle its visibility with a mapping. YCM provides the "Plug" mapping <Plug>(YCMToggleSignatureHelp) for this.

For example, to hide/show the signature help popup by pressing Ctrl+l in insert mode: imap <silent> <C-l> <Plug>(YCMToggleSignatureHelp).

NOTE: No default mapping is provided because insert mappings are very difficult to create without breaking or overriding some existing functionality. Ctrl-l is not a suggestion, just an example.

General Semantic Completion

You can use Ctrl+Space to trigger the completion suggestions anywhere, even without a string prefix. This is useful to see which top-level functions are available for use.

C-family Semantic Completion

NOTE: YCM originally used the libclang based engine for C-family, but users should migrate to clangd, as it provides more features and better performance. Users who rely on override_filename in their .ycm_extra_conf.py will need to stay on the old libclang engine. Instructions on how to stay on the old engine are available on the wiki.

Some of the features of clangd:

  • Project wide indexing: Clangd has both dynamic and static index support. The dynamic index stores up-to-date symbols coming from any files you are currently editing, whereas static index contains project-wide symbol information. This symbol information is used for code completion and code navigation. Whereas libclang is limited to the current translation unit(TU).
  • Code navigation: Clangd provides all the GoTo requests libclang provides and it improves those using the above mentioned index information to contain project-wide information rather than just the current TU.
  • Rename: Clangd can perform semantic rename operations on the current file, whereas libclang doesn't support such functionality.
  • Code Completion: Clangd can perform code completions at a lower latency than libclang; also, it has information about all the symbols in your project so it can suggest items outside your current TU and also provides proper #include insertions for those items.
  • Signature help: Clangd provides signature help so that you can see the names and types of arguments when calling functions.
  • Format Code: Clangd provides code formatting either for the selected lines or the whole file, whereas libclang doesn't have such functionality.
  • Performance: Clangd has faster re-parse and code completion times compared to libclang.

Installation

On supported architectures, the install.py script will download a suitable clangd (--clangd-completer) or libclang (--clang-completer) for you. Supported architectures are:

  • Linux glibc >= 2.17 (Intel, armv7-a, aarch64) - built on ubuntu 18.04
  • MacOS >=10.15 (Intel, arm64)
    • For Intel, compatibility per clang.llvm.org downloads
    • For arm64, macOS 10.15+
  • Windows (Intel) - compatibility per clang.llvm.org downloads

clangd:

Typically, clangd is installed by the YCM installer (either with --all or with --clangd-completer). This downloads a pre-built clangd binary for your architecture. If your OS or architecture is not supported or too old, you can install a compatible clangd and use g:ycm_clangd_binary_path to point to it.

libclang:

libclang can be enabled also with --all or --clang-completer. As with clangd, YCM will try and download a version of libclang that is suitable for your environment, but again if your environment can't be supported, you can build or acquire libclang for yourself and specify it when building, as:

$ EXTRA_CMAKE_ARGS='-DPATH_TO_LLVM_ROOT=/path/to/your/llvm' ./install.py --clang-compelter --system-libclang

Please note that if using custom clangd or libclang it must match the version that YCM requires. Currently YCM requires clang 13.0.0.

Compile flags

In order to perform semantic analysis such as code completion, GoTo and diagnostics, YouCompleteMe uses clangd, which makes use of clang compiler, sometimes also referred to as LLVM. Like any compiler, clang also requires a set of compile flags in order to parse your code. Simply put: If clang can't parse your code, YouCompleteMe can't provide semantic analysis.

There are 2 methods which can be used to provide compile flags to clang:

Option 1: Use a compilation database

The easiest way to get YCM to compile your code is to use a compilation database. A compilation database is usually generated by your build system (e.g. CMake) and contains the compiler invocation for each compilation unit in your project.

For information on how to generate a compilation database, see the clang documentation. In short:

  • If using CMake, add -DCMAKE_EXPORT_COMPILE_COMMANDS=ON when configuring (or add set( CMAKE_EXPORT_COMPILE_COMMANDS ON ) to CMakeLists.txt) and copy or symlink the generated database to the root of your project.
  • If using Ninja, check out the compdb tool (-t compdb) in its docs.
  • If using GNU make, check out compiledb or Bear.
  • For other build systems, check out .ycm_extra_conf.py below.

If no .ycm_extra_conf.py is found, YouCompleteMe automatically tries to load a compilation database if there is one.

YCM looks for a file named compile_commands.json in the directory of the opened file or in any directory above it in the hierarchy (recursively); when the file is found before a local .ycm_extra_conf.py, YouCompleteMe stops searching the directories and lets clangd take over and handle the flags.

Option 2: Provide the flags manually

If you don't have a compilation database, or aren't able to generate one, you have to tell YouCompleteMe how to compile your code some other way.

Every C-family project is different. It is not possible for YCM to guess what compiler flags to supply for your project. Fortunately, YCM provides a mechanism for you to generate the flags for a particular file with arbitrary complexity. This is achieved by requiring you to provide a Python module which implements a trivial function which, given the file name as argument, returns a list of compiler flags to use to compile that file.

YCM looks for a .ycm_extra_conf.py file in the directory of the opened file or in any directory above it in the hierarchy (recursively); when the file is found, it is loaded (only once!) as a Python module. YCM calls a Settings method in that module which should provide it with the information necessary to compile the current file. You can also provide a path to a global configuration file with the g:ycm_global_ycm_extra_conf option, which will be used as a fallback. To prevent the execution of malicious code from a file you didn't write YCM will ask you once per .ycm_extra_conf.py if it is safe to load. This can be disabled and you can white-/blacklist files. See the g:ycm_confirm_extra_conf and g:ycm_extra_conf_globlist options respectively.

This system was designed this way so that the user can perform any arbitrary sequence of operations to produce a list of compilation flags YCM should hand to Clang.

NOTE: It is highly recommended to include -x <language> flag to libclang. This is so that the correct language is detected, particularly for header files. Common values are -x c for C, -x c++ for C++, -x objc for Objective-C, and -x cuda for CUDA.

To give you an impression, if your C++ project is trivial, and your usual compilation command is: g++ -Wall -Wextra -Werror -o FILE.o FILE.cc, then the following .ycm_extra_conf.py is enough to get semantic analysis from YouCompleteMe:

def Settings( **kwargs ):
  return {
    'flags': [ '-x', 'c++', '-Wall', '-Wextra', '-Werror' ],
  }

As you can see from the trivial example, YCM calls the Settings method which returns a dictionary with a single element 'flags'. This element is a list of compiler flags to pass to libclang for the current file. The absolute path of that file is accessible under the filename key of the kwargs dictionary. That's it! This is actually enough for most projects, but for complex projects it is not uncommon to integrate directly with an existing build system using the full power of the Python language.

For a more elaborate example, see ycmd's own .ycm_extra_conf.py. You should be able to use it as a starting point. Don't just copy/paste that file somewhere and expect things to magically work; your project needs different flags. Hint: just replace the strings in the flags variable with compilation flags necessary for your project. That should be enough for 99% of projects.

You could also consider using YCM-Generator to generate the ycm_extra_conf.py file.

Errors during compilation

If Clang encounters errors when compiling the header files that your file includes, then it's probably going to take a long time to get completions. When the completion menu finally appears, it's going to have a large number of unrelated completion strings (type/function names that are not actually members). This is because Clang fails to build a precompiled preamble for your file if there are any errors in the included headers and that preamble is key to getting fast completions.

Call the :YcmDiags command to see if any errors or warnings were detected in your file.

Java Semantic Completion

Java quick Start

Ensure that you have enabled the Java completer. See the installation guide for details.

Create a project file (gradle or maven) file in the root directory of your Java project, by following the instructions below.

(Optional) Configure the LSP server. The jdt.ls configuration options can be found in their codebase.

If you previously used Eclim or Syntastic for Java, disable them for Java.

Edit a Java file from your project.

Java Project Files

In order to provide semantic analysis, the Java completion engine requires knowledge of your project structure. In particular it needs to know the class path to use, when compiling your code. Fortunately jdt.ls supports eclipse project files, maven projects and gradle projects.

NOTE: Our recommendation is to use either maven or gradle projects.

Diagnostic display - Syntastic

The native support for Java includes YCM's native realtime diagnostics display. This can conflict with other diagnostics plugins like Syntastic, so when enabling Java support, please manually disable Syntastic Java diagnostics.

Add the following to your vimrc:

let g:syntastic_java_checkers = []

Diagnostic display - Eclim

The native support for Java includes YCM's native realtime diagnostics display. This can conflict with other diagnostics plugins like Eclim, so when enabling Java support, please manually disable Eclim Java diagnostics.

Add the following to your vimrc:

let g:EclimFileTypeValidate = 0

NOTE: We recommend disabling Eclim entirely when editing Java with YCM's native Java support. This can be done temporarily with :EclimDisable.

Eclipse Projects

Eclipse style projects require two files: .project and .classpath.

If your project already has these files due to previously being set up within eclipse, then no setup is required. jdt.ls should load the project just fine (it's basically eclipse after all).

However, if not, it is possible (easy in fact) to craft them manually, though it is not recommended. You're better off using gradle or maven (see below).

A simple eclipse style project example can be found in the ycmd test directory. Normally all that is required is to copy these files to the root of your project and to edit the .classpath to add additional libraries, such as:

  <classpathentry kind="lib" path="/path/to/external/jar" />
  <classpathentry kind="lib" path="/path/to/external/java/source" />

It may also be necessary to change the directory in which your source files are located (paths are relative to the .project file itself):

  <classpathentry kind="src" output="target/classes" path="path/to/src/" />

NOTE: The eclipse project and classpath files are not a public interface and it is highly recommended to use Maven or Gradle project definitions if you don't already use eclipse to manage your projects.

Maven Projects

Maven needs a file named pom.xml in the root of the project. Once again a simple pom.xml can be found in ycmd source.

The format of pom.xml files is way beyond the scope of this document, but we do recommend using the various tools that can generate them for you, if you're not familiar with them already.

Gradle Projects

Gradle projects require a build.gradle. Again, there is a trivial example in ycmd's tests.

The format of build.gradle files is way beyond the scope of this document, but we do recommend using the various tools that can generate them for you, if you're not familiar with them already.

Some users have experienced issues with their jdt.ls when using the Groovy language for their build.gradle. As such, try using Kotlin instead.

Troubleshooting

If you're not getting completions or diagnostics, check the server health:

  • The Java completion engine takes a while to start up and parse your project. You should be able to see its progress in the command line, and :YcmDebugInfo. Ensure that the following lines are present:
--   jdt.ls Java Language Server running
--   jdt.ls Java Language Server Startup Status: Ready
  • If the above lines don't appear after a few minutes, check the jdt.ls and ycmd log files using :YcmToggleLogs . The jdt.ls log file is called .log (for some reason).

If you get a message about "classpath is incomplete", then make sure you have correctly configured the project files.

If you get messages about unresolved imports, then make sure you have correctly configured the project files, in particular check that the classpath is set correctly.

C# Semantic Completion

YCM relies on OmniSharp-Roslyn to provide completion and code navigation. OmniSharp-Roslyn needs a solution file for a C# project and there are two ways of letting YCM know about your solution files.

Automatically discovered solution files

YCM will scan all parent directories of the file currently being edited and look for file with .sln extension.

Manually specified solution files

If YCM loads .ycm_extra_conf.py which contains CSharpSolutionFile function, YCM will try to use that to determine the solution file. This is useful when one wants to override the default behaviour and specify a solution file that is not in any of the parent directories of the currently edited file. Example:

def CSharpSolutionFile( filepath ):
  # `filepath` is the path of the file user is editing
  return '/path/to/solution/file' # Can be relative to the `.ycm_extra_conf.py`

If the path returned by CSharpSolutionFile is not an actual file, YCM will fall back to the other way of finding the file.

Python Semantic Completion

YCM relies on the Jedi engine to provide completion and code navigation. By default, it will pick the version of Python running the ycmd server and use its sys.path. While this is fine for simple projects, this needs to be configurable when working with virtual environments or in a project with third-party packages. The next sections explain how to do that.

Working with virtual environments

A common practice when working on a Python project is to install its dependencies in a virtual environment and develop the project inside that environment. To support this, YCM needs to know the interpreter path of the virtual environment. You can specify it by creating a .ycm_extra_conf.py file at the root of your project with the following contents:

def Settings( **kwargs ):
  return {
    'interpreter_path': '/path/to/virtual/environment/python'
  }

Here, /path/to/virtual/environment/python is the path to the Python used by the virtual environment you are working in. Typically, the executable can be found in the Scripts folder of the virtual environment directory on Windows and in the bin folder on other platforms.

If you don't like having to create a .ycm_extra_conf.py file at the root of your project and would prefer to specify the interpreter path with a Vim option, read the Configuring through Vim options section.

Working with third-party packages

Another common practice is to put the dependencies directly into the project and add their paths to sys.path at runtime in order to import them. YCM needs to be told about this path manipulation to support those dependencies. This can be done by creating a .ycm_extra_conf.py file at the root of the project. This file must define a Settings( **kwargs ) function returning a dictionary with the list of paths to prepend to sys.path under the sys_path key. For instance, the following .ycm_extra_conf.py adds the paths /path/to/some/third_party/package and /path/to/another/third_party/package at the start of sys.path:

def Settings( **kwargs ):
  return {
    'sys_path': [
      '/path/to/some/third_party/package',
      '/path/to/another/third_party/package'
    ]
  }

If you would rather prepend paths to sys.path with a Vim option, read the Configuring through Vim options section.

If you need further control on how to add paths to sys.path, you should define the PythonSysPath( **kwargs ) function in the .ycm_extra_conf.py file. Its keyword arguments are sys_path which contains the default sys.path, and interpreter_path which is the path to the Python interpreter. Here's a trivial example that insert the /path/to/third_party/package path at the second position of sys.path:

def PythonSysPath( **kwargs ):
  sys_path = kwargs[ 'sys_path' ]
  sys_path.insert( 1, '/path/to/third_party/package' )
  return sys_path

A more advanced example can be found in YCM's own .ycm_extra_conf.py.

Configuring through Vim options

You may find inconvenient to have to create a .ycm_extra_conf.py file at the root of each one of your projects in order to set the path to the Python interpreter and/or add paths to sys.path and would prefer to be able to configure those through Vim options. Don't worry, this is possible by using the g:ycm_extra_conf_vim_data option and creating a global extra configuration file. Let's take an example. Suppose that you want to set the interpreter path with the g:ycm_python_interpreter_path option and prepend paths to sys.path with the g:ycm_python_sys_path option. Suppose also that you want to name the global extra configuration file global_extra_conf.py and that you want to put it in your HOME folder. You should then add the following lines to your vimrc:

let g:ycm_python_interpreter_path = ''
let g:ycm_python_sys_path = []
let g:ycm_extra_conf_vim_data = [
  \  'g:ycm_python_interpreter_path',
  \  'g:ycm_python_sys_path'
  \]
let g:ycm_global_ycm_extra_conf = '~/global_extra_conf.py'

Then, create the ~/global_extra_conf.py file with the following contents:

def Settings( **kwargs ):
  client_data = kwargs[ 'client_data' ]
  return {
    'interpreter_path': client_data[ 'g:ycm_python_interpreter_path' ],
    'sys_path': client_data[ 'g:ycm_python_sys_path' ]
  }

That's it. You are done. Note that you don't need to restart the server when setting one of the options. YCM will automatically pick the new values.

Rust Semantic Completion

YCM uses rust-analyzer for Rust semantic completion.

NOTE: Previously, YCM used rls for rust completion. This is no longer supported, as the Rust community has decided on rust-analyzer as the future of Rust tooling.

Completions and GoTo commands within the current crate and its dependencies should work out of the box with no additional configuration (provided that you built YCM with the --rust-completer flag; see the Installation section for details). The install script takes care of installing the Rust source code, so no configuration is necessary.

rust-analyzer supports a myriad of options. These are configured using LSP configuration, and are documented here.

Go Semantic Completion

Completions and GoTo commands should work out of the box (provided that you built YCM with the --go-completer flag; see the Installation section for details). The server only works for projects with the "canonical" layout.

gopls also has a handful of undocumented options for which the source code is the only reference.

JavaScript and TypeScript Semantic Completion

NOTE: YCM originally used the Tern engine for JavaScript but due to Tern not being maintained anymore by its main author and the TSServer engine offering more features, YCM is moving to TSServer. This won't affect you if you were already using Tern but you are encouraged to do the switch by deleting the third_party/ycmd/third_party/tern_runtime/node_modules directory in YCM folder. If you are a new user but still want to use Tern, you should pass the --js-completer option to the install.py script during installation. Further instructions on how to setup YCM with Tern are available on the wiki.

All JavaScript and TypeScript features are provided by the TSServer engine, which is included in the TypeScript SDK. To enable these features, install Node.js and npm and call the install.py script with the --ts-completer flag.

TSServer relies on the jsconfig.json file for JavaScript and the tsconfig.json file for TypeScript to analyze your project. Ensure the file exists at the root of your project.

To get diagnostics in JavaScript, set the checkJs option to true in your jsconfig.json file:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "checkJs": true
    }
}

Semantic Completion for Other Languages

C-family, C#, Go, Java, Python, Rust, and JavaScript/TypeScript languages are supported natively by YouCompleteMe using the Clang, OmniSharp-Roslyn, Gopls, jdt.ls, Jedi, rust-analyzer, and TSServer engines, respectively. Check the installation section for instructions to enable these features if desired.

Plugging an arbitrary LSP server

Similar to other LSP clients, YCM can use an arbitrary LSP server with the help of g:ycm_language_server option. An example of a value of this option would be:

let g:ycm_language_server = 
  \ [ 
  \   {
  \     'name': 'yaml',
  \     'cmdline': [ '/path/to/yaml/server/yaml-language-server', '--stdio' ],
  \     'filetypes': [ 'yaml' ]
  \   },
  \   {
  \     'name': 'rust',
  \     'cmdline': [ 'ra_lsp_server' ],
  \     'filetypes': [ 'rust' ],
  \     'project_root_files': [ 'Cargo.toml' ]
  \   },
  \   {
  \     'name': 'godot',
  \     'filetypes': [ 'gdscript' ],
  \     'port': 6008,
  \     'project_root_files': [ 'project.godot' ]
  \    }
  \ ]

Each dictionary contains the following keys:

  • name (string, mandatory): When configuring a LSP server the value of the name key will be used as the kwargs[ 'language' ]. Can be anything you like.
  • filetypes (list of string, mandatory): List of Vim filetypes this server should be used for.
  • project_root_files (list of string, optional): List of filenames to search for when trying to determine the project root.
  • cmdline (list of string, optional): If supplied, the server is started with this command line (each list element is a command line word). Typically, the server should be started with STDIO communication. If not supplied, port must be supplied.
  • port (number, optional): If supplied, ycmd will connect to the server at localhost:<port> using TCP (remote servers are not supported).
  • capabilities (dict, optional): If supplied, this is a dictionary that is merged with the LSP client capabilities reported to the language server. This can be used to enable or disable certain features, such as the support for configuration sections (workspace/configuration).

See the LSP Examples project for more examples of configuring the likes of PHP, Ruby, Kotlin, and D.

LSP Configuration

Many LSP servers allow some level of user configuration. YCM enables this with the help of .ycm_extra_conf.py files. Here's an example of jdt.ls user examples of configuring the likes of PHP, Ruby, Kotlin, D, and many, many more.

def Settings( **kwargs ):
  if kwargs[ 'language' ] == 'java':
    return {
      'ls': {
        'java.format.onType.enabled': True
      }
    }

The ls key tells YCM that the dictionary should be passed to the LSP server. For each of the LSP server's configuration you should look up the respective server's documentation.

Some servers request settings from arbitrary 'sections' of configuration. There is no concept of configuration sections in vim, so you can specify an additional config_sections dictionary which maps section to a dictionary of config required by the server. For example:

def Settings( **kwargs ):
  if kwargs[ 'language' ] == 'java':
    return {
      'ls': {
        'java.format.onType.enabled': True
      },
      'config_sections': {
        'some section': {
          'some option': 'some value'
        }
    }

The sections and options/values are complete server-specific and rarely well documented.

Using omnifunc for semantic completion

YCM will use your omnifunc (see :h omnifunc in Vim) as a source for semantic completions if it does not have a native semantic completion engine for your file's filetype. Vim comes with rudimentary omnifuncs for various languages like Ruby, PHP, etc. It depends on the language.

You can get a stellar omnifunc for Ruby with Eclim. Just make sure you have the latest Eclim installed and configured (this means Eclim >= 2.2.* and Eclipse >= 4.2.*).

After installing Eclim remember to create a new Eclipse project within your application by typing :ProjectCreate <path-to-your-project> -n ruby inside vim and don't forget to have let g:EclimCompletionMethod = 'omnifunc' in your vimrc. This will make YCM and Eclim play nice; YCM will use Eclim's omnifuncs as the data source for semantic completions and provide the auto-triggering and subsequence-based matching (and other YCM features) on top of it.

Writing New Semantic Completers

You have two options here: writing an omnifunc for Vim's omnicomplete system that YCM will then use through its omni-completer, or a custom completer for YCM using the Completer API.

Here are the differences between the two approaches:

  • You have to use VimScript to write the omnifunc, but get to use Python to write for the Completer API; this by itself should make you want to use the API.
  • The Completer API is a much more powerful way to integrate with YCM and it provides a wider set of features. For instance, you can make your Completer query your semantic back-end in an asynchronous fashion, thus not blocking Vim's GUI thread while your completion system is processing stuff. This is impossible with VimScript. All of YCM's completers use the Completer API.
  • Performance with the Completer API is better since Python executes faster than VimScript.

If you want to use the omnifunc system, see the relevant Vim docs with :h complete-functions. For the Completer API, see the API docs.

If you want to upstream your completer into YCM's source, you should use the Completer API.

Diagnostic Display

YCM will display diagnostic notifications for the C-family, C#, Go, Java, JavaScript, Rust and TypeScript languages. Since YCM continuously recompiles your file as you type, you'll get notified of errors and warnings in your file as fast as possible.

Here are the various pieces of the diagnostic UI:

  • Icons show up in the Vim gutter on lines that have a diagnostic.
  • Regions of text related to diagnostics are highlighted (by default, a red wavy underline in gvim and a red background in vim).
  • Moving the cursor to a line with a diagnostic echoes the diagnostic text.
  • Vim's location list is automatically populated with diagnostic data (off by default, see options).

The new diagnostics (if any) will be displayed the next time you press any key on the keyboard. So if you stop typing and just wait for the new diagnostics to come in, that will not work. You need to press some key for the GUI to update.

Having to press a key to get the updates is unfortunate, but cannot be changed due to the way Vim internals operate; there is no way that a background task can update Vim's GUI after it has finished running. You have to press a key. This will make YCM check for any pending diagnostics updates.

You can force a full, blocking compilation cycle with the :YcmForceCompileAndDiagnostics command (you may want to map that command to a key; try putting nnoremap <F5> :YcmForceCompileAndDiagnostics<CR> in your vimrc). Calling this command will force YCM to immediately recompile your file and display any new diagnostics it encounters. Do note that recompilation with this command may take a while and during this time the Vim GUI will be blocked.

YCM will display a short diagnostic message when you move your cursor to the line with the error. You can get a detailed diagnostic message with the <leader>d key mapping (can be changed in the options) YCM provides when your cursor is on the line with the diagnostic.

You can also see the full diagnostic message for all the diagnostics in the current file in Vim's locationlist, which can be opened with the :lopen and :lclose commands (make sure you have set let g:ycm_always_populate_location_list = 1 in your vimrc). A good way to toggle the display of the locationlist with a single key mapping is provided by another (very small) Vim plugin called ListToggle (which also makes it possible to change the height of the locationlist window), also written by yours truly.

Diagnostic Highlighting Groups

You can change the styling for the highlighting groups YCM uses. For the signs in the Vim gutter, the relevant groups are:

  • YcmErrorSign, which falls back to group SyntasticErrorSign and then error if they exist
  • YcmWarningSign, which falls back to group SyntasticWarningSign and then todo if they exist

You can also style the line that has the warning/error with these groups:

  • YcmErrorLine, which falls back to group SyntasticErrorLine if it exists
  • YcmWarningLine, which falls back to group SyntasticWarningLine if it exists

Note that the line highlighting groups only work when the g:ycm_enable_diagnostic_signs option is set. If you want highlighted lines but no signs in the Vim gutter, set the signcolumn option to no in your vimrc:

set signcolumn=no

The syntax groups used to highlight regions of text with errors/warnings:

  • YcmErrorSection, which falls back to group SyntasticError if it exists and then SpellBad
  • YcmWarningSection, which falls back to group SyntasticWarning if it exists and then SpellCap

Here's how you'd change the style for a group:

highlight YcmErrorLine guibg=#3f0000

Symbol Search

This feature requires Vim and is not supported in Neovim

YCM provides a way to search for and jump to a symbol in the current project or document when using supported languages.

You can search for symbols in the current workspace when the GoToSymbol request is supported and the current document when GoToDocumentOutline is supported.

Here's a quick demo:

asciicast

As you can see, you can type and YCM filters down the list as you type. The current set of matches are displayed in a popup window in the centre of the screen and you can select an entry with the keyboard, to jump to that position. Any matches are then added to the quickfix list.

To enable:

  • nmap <something> <Plug>(YCMFindSymbolInWorkspace)
  • nmap <something> <Plug>(YCMFindSymbolInDocument)

e.g.

  • nmap <leader>yfw <Plug>(YCMFindSymbolInWorkspace)
  • nmap <leader>yfd <Plug>(YCMFindSymbolInDocument)

When searching, YCM opens a prompt buffer at the top of the screen for the input, and puts you in insert mode. This means that you can hit <Esc> to go into normal mode and use any other input commands that are supported in prompt buffers. As you type characters, the search is updated.

While the popup is open, the following keys are intercepted:

  • <C-j>, <Down>, <C-n>, <Tab> - select the next item
  • <C-k>, <Up>, <C-p>, <S-Tab> - select the previous item
  • <PageUp>, <kPageUp> - jump up one screenful of items
  • <PageDown>, <kPageDown> - jump down one screenful of items
  • <Home>, <kHome> - jump to first item
  • <End>, <kEnd> - jump to last item
  • <CR> - jump to the selected item
  • <C-c> cancel/dismiss the popup

The search is also cancelled if you leave the prompt buffer window at any time, so you can use window commands <C-w>... for example.

Closing the popup

NOTE: Pressing <Esc> does not close the popup - you must use Ctrl-c for that, or use a window command (e.g. <Ctrl-w>j) or the mouse to leave the prompt buffer window.

Commands

The :YcmRestartServer command

If the ycmd completion server suddenly stops for some reason, you can restart it with this command.

The :YcmForceCompileAndDiagnostics command

Calling this command will force YCM to immediately recompile your file and display any new diagnostics it encounters. Do note that recompilation with this command may take a while and during this time the Vim GUI will be blocked.

You may want to map this command to a key; try putting nnoremap <F5> :YcmForceCompileAndDiagnostics<CR> in your vimrc.

The :YcmDiags command

Calling this command will fill Vim's locationlist with errors or warnings if any were detected in your file and then open it. If a given error or warning can be fixed by a call to :YcmCompleter FixIt, then (FixIt available) is appended to the error or warning text. See the FixIt completer subcommand for more information.

NOTE: The absence of (FixIt available) does not strictly imply a fix-it is not available as not all completers are able to provide this indication. For example, the c-sharp completer provides many fix-its but does not add this additional indication.

The g:ycm_open_loclist_on_ycm_diags option can be used to prevent the location list from opening, but still have it filled with new diagnostic data. See the Options section for details.

The :YcmShowDetailedDiagnostic command

This command shows the full diagnostic text when the user's cursor is on the line with the diagnostic.

The :YcmDebugInfo command

This will print out various debug information for the current file. Useful to see what compile commands will be used for the file if you're using the semantic completion engine.

The :YcmToggleLogs command

This command presents the list of logfiles created by YCM, the ycmd server, and the semantic engine server for the current filetype, if any. One of these logfiles can be opened in the editor (or closed if already open) by entering the corresponding number or by clicking on it with the mouse. Additionally, this command can take the logfile names as arguments. Use the <TAB> key (or any other key defined by the wildchar option) to complete the arguments or to cycle through them (depending on the value of the wildmode option). Each logfile given as an argument is directly opened (or closed if already open) in the editor. Only for debugging purposes.

The :YcmCompleter command

This command gives access to a number of additional IDE-like features in YCM, for things like semantic GoTo, type information, FixIt and refactoring.

This command accepts a range that can either be specified through a selection in one of Vim's visual modes (see :h visual-use) or on the command line. For instance, :2,5YcmCompleter will apply the command from line 2 to line 5. This is useful for the Format subcommand.

Call YcmCompleter without further arguments for a list of the commands you can call for the current completer.

See the file type feature summary for an overview of the features available for each file type. See the YcmCompleter subcommands section for more information on the available subcommands and their usage.

YcmCompleter Subcommands

NOTE: See the docs for the YcmCompleter command before tackling this section.

The invoked subcommand is automatically routed to the currently active semantic completer, so :YcmCompleter GoToDefinition will invoke the GoToDefinition subcommand on the Python semantic completer if the currently active file is a Python one and on the Clang completer if the currently active file is a C-family language one.

You may also want to map the subcommands to something less verbose; for instance, nnoremap <leader>jd :YcmCompleter GoTo<CR> maps the <leader>jd sequence to the longer subcommand invocation.

GoTo Commands

These commands are useful for jumping around and exploring code. When moving the cursor, the subcommands add entries to Vim's jumplist so you can use CTRL-O to jump back to where you were before invoking the command (and CTRL-I to jump forward; see :h jumplist for details). If there is more than one destination, the quickfix list (see :h quickfix) is populated with the available locations and opened to full width at the bottom of the screen. You can change this behavior by using the YcmQuickFixOpened autocommand.

The GoToInclude subcommand

Looks up the current line for a header and jumps to it.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda

The GoToDeclaration subcommand

Looks up the symbol under the cursor and jumps to its declaration.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, cs, go, java, javascript, python, rust, typescript

The GoToDefinition subcommand

Looks up the symbol under the cursor and jumps to its definition.

NOTE: For C-family languages this only works in certain situations, namely when the definition of the symbol is in the current translation unit. A translation unit consists of the file you are editing and all the files you are including with #include directives (directly or indirectly) in that file.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, cs, go, java, javascript, python, rust, typescript

The GoTo subcommand

This command tries to perform the "most sensible" GoTo operation it can. Currently, this means that it tries to look up the symbol under the cursor and jumps to its definition if possible; if the definition is not accessible from the current translation unit, jumps to the symbol's declaration. For C-family languages, it first tries to look up the current line for a header and jump to it. For C#, implementations are also considered and preferred.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, cs, go, java, javascript, python, rust, typescript

The GoToImprecise subcommand

WARNING: This command trades correctness for speed!

Same as the GoTo command except that it doesn't recompile the file with libclang before looking up nodes in the AST. This can be very useful when you're editing files that take long to compile but you know that you haven't made any changes since the last parse that would lead to incorrect jumps. When you're just browsing around your codebase, this command can spare you quite a bit of latency.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda

The GoToSymbol <symbol query> subcommand

Finds the definition of all symbols matching a specified string. Note that this does not use any sort of smart/fuzzy matching. However, an interactive symbol search is also available.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, cs, java, javascript, python, typescript

The GoToReferences subcommand

This command attempts to find all of the references within the project to the identifier under the cursor and populates the quickfix list with those locations.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, java, javascript, python, typescript, rust

The GoToImplementation subcommand

Looks up the symbol under the cursor and jumps to its implementation (i.e. non-interface). If there are multiple implementations, instead provides a list of implementations to choose from.

Supported in filetypes: cs, go, java, rust, typescript, javascript

The GoToImplementationElseDeclaration subcommand

Looks up the symbol under the cursor and jumps to its implementation if one, else jump to its declaration. If there are multiple implementations, instead provides a list of implementations to choose from.

Supported in filetypes: cs

The GoToType subcommand

Looks up the symbol under the cursor and jumps to the definition of its type e.g. if the symbol is an object, go to the definition of its class.

Supported in filetypes: go, java, javascript, typescript

The GoToDocumentOutline subcommand

Provides a list of symbols in current document, in the quickfix list. See also interactive symbol search.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, go, java, rust

The GoToCallers and GoToCallees subcommands

Populate the quickfix list with the callers, or callees respectively, of the function associated with the current cursor position. The semantics of this differ depending on the filetype and language server.

Only supported for LSP servers which provide the callHierarchyProvider capability.

Semantic Information Commands

These commands are useful for finding static information about the code, such as the types of variables, viewing declarations and documentation strings.

The GetType subcommand

Echos the type of the variable or method under the cursor, and where it differs, the derived type.

For example:

    std::string s;

Invoking this command on s returns std::string => std::basic_string<char>

NOTE: Causes re-parsing of the current translation unit.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, java, javascript, go, python, typescript, rust

The GetTypeImprecise subcommand

WARNING: This command trades correctness for speed!

Same as the GetType command except that it doesn't recompile the file with libclang before looking up nodes in the AST. This can be very useful when you're editing files that take long to compile but you know that you haven't made any changes since the last parse that would lead to incorrect type. When you're just browsing around your codebase, this command can spare you quite a bit of latency.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda

The GetParent subcommand

Echos the semantic parent of the point under the cursor.

The semantic parent is the item that semantically contains the given position.

For example:

class C {
    void f();
};

void C::f() {

}

In the out-of-line definition of C::f, the semantic parent is the class C, of which this function is a member.

In the example above, both declarations of C::f have C as their semantic context, while the lexical context of the first C::f is C and the lexical context of the second C::f is the translation unit.

For global declarations, the semantic parent is the translation unit.

NOTE: Causes re-parsing of the current translation unit.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda

The GetDoc subcommand

Displays the preview window populated with quick info about the identifier under the cursor. Depending on the file type, this includes things like:

  • The type or declaration of identifier,
  • Doxygen/javadoc comments,
  • Python docstrings,
  • etc.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, cs, go, java, javascript, python, typescript, rust

The GetDocImprecise subcommand

WARNING: This command trades correctness for speed!

Same as the GetDoc command except that it doesn't recompile the file with libclang before looking up nodes in the AST. This can be very useful when you're editing files that take long to compile but you know that you haven't made any changes since the last parse that would lead to incorrect docs. When you're just browsing around your codebase, this command can spare you quite a bit of latency.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda

Refactoring Commands

These commands make changes to your source code in order to perform refactoring or code correction. YouCompleteMe does not perform any action which cannot be undone, and never saves or writes files to the disk.

The FixIt subcommand

Where available, attempts to make changes to the buffer to correct diagnostics on the current line. Where multiple suggestions are available (such as when there are multiple ways to resolve a given warning, or where multiple diagnostics are reported for the current line), the options are presented and one can be selected.

Completers which provide diagnostics may also provide trivial modifications to the source in order to correct the diagnostic. Examples include syntax errors such as missing trailing semi-colons, spurious characters, or other errors which the semantic engine can deterministically suggest corrections.

If no fix-it is available for the current line, or there is no diagnostic on the current line, this command has no effect on the current buffer. If any modifications are made, the number of changes made to the buffer is echo'd and the user may use the editor's undo command to revert.

When a diagnostic is available, and g:ycm_echo_current_diagnostic is set to 1, then the text (FixIt) is appended to the echo'd diagnostic when the completer is able to add this indication. The text (FixIt available) is also appended to the diagnostic text in the output of the :YcmDiags command for any diagnostics with available fix-its (where the completer can provide this indication).

NOTE: Causes re-parsing of the current translation unit.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, cs, go, java, javascript, rust, typescript

The RefactorRename <new name> subcommand

In supported file types, this command attempts to perform a semantic rename of the identifier under the cursor. This includes renaming declarations, definitions and usages of the identifier, or any other language-appropriate action. The specific behavior is defined by the semantic engine in use.

Similar to FixIt, this command applies automatic modifications to your source files. Rename operations may involve changes to multiple files, which may or may not be open in Vim buffers at the time. YouCompleteMe handles all of this for you. The behavior is described in the following section.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, java, javascript, python, typescript, rust, cs

Multi-file Refactor

When a Refactor or FixIt command touches multiple files, YouCompleteMe attempts to apply those modifications to any existing open, visible buffer in the current tab. If no such buffer can be found, YouCompleteMe opens the file in a new small horizontal split at the top of the current window, applies the change, and then hides the window. NOTE: The buffer remains open, and must be manually saved. A confirmation dialog is opened prior to doing this to remind you that this is about to happen.

Once the modifications have been made, the quickfix list (see :help quickfix) is populated with the locations of all modifications. This can be used to review all automatic changes made by using :copen. Typically, use the CTRL-W <enter> combination to open the selected file in a new split. It is possible to customize how the quickfix window is opened by using the YcmQuickFixOpened autocommand.

The buffers are not saved automatically. That is, you must save the modified buffers manually after reviewing the changes from the quickfix list. Changes can be undone using Vim's powerful undo features (see :help undo). Note that Vim's undo is per-buffer, so to undo all changes, the undo commands must be applied in each modified buffer separately.

NOTE: While applying modifications, Vim may find files which are already open and have a swap file. The command is aborted if you select Abort or Quit in any such prompts. This leaves the Refactor operation partially complete and must be manually corrected using Vim's undo features. The quickfix list is not populated in this case. Inspect :buffers or equivalent (see :help buffers) to see the buffers that were opened by the command.

The Format subcommand

This command formats the whole buffer or some part of it according to the value of the Vim options shiftwidth and expandtab (see :h 'sw' and :h et respectively). To format a specific part of your document, you can either select it in one of Vim's visual modes (see :h visual-use) and run the command or directly enter the range on the command line, e.g. :2,5YcmCompleter Format to format it from line 2 to line 5.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, java, javascript, go, typescript, rust, cs

The OrganizeImports subcommand

This command removes unused imports and sorts imports in the current file. It can also group imports from the same module in TypeScript and resolves imports in Java.

Supported in filetypes: java, javascript, typescript

Miscellaneous Commands

These commands are for general administration, rather than IDE-like features. They cover things like the semantic engine server instance and compilation flags.

The ExecuteCommand <args> subcommand

Some LSP completers (currently only Java completers) support executing server specific commands. Consult the jdt.ls documentation to find out what commands are supported and which arguments are expected.

The support for ExecuteCommand was implemented to support plugins like Vimspector to debug java, but isn't limited to that specific use case.

The RestartServer subcommand

Restarts the downstream semantic engine server for those semantic engines that work as separate servers that YCM talks to.

Supported in filetypes: c, cpp, objc, objcpp, cuda, cs, go, java, javascript, rust, typescript

The ReloadSolution subcommand

Instruct the Omnisharp-Roslyn server to clear its cache and reload all files from disk. This is useful when files are added, removed, or renamed in the solution, files are changed outside of Vim, or whenever Omnisharp-Roslyn cache is out-of-sync.

Supported in filetypes: cs

Functions

The youcompleteme#GetErrorCount function

Get the number of YCM Diagnostic errors. If no errors are present, this function returns 0.

For example:

  call youcompleteme#GetErrorCount()

Both this function and youcompleteme#GetWarningCount can be useful when integrating YCM with other Vim plugins. For example, a lightline user could add a diagnostics section to their statusline which would display the number of errors and warnings.

The youcompleteme#GetWarningCount function

Get the number of YCM Diagnostic warnings. If no warnings are present, this function returns 0.

For example:

  call youcompleteme#GetWarningCount()

The youcompleteme#GetCommandResponse( ... ) function

Run a completer subcommand and return the result as a string. This can be useful for example to display the GetGoc output in a popup window, e.g.:

let s:ycm_hover_popup = -1
function s:Hover()
  let response = youcompleteme#GetCommandResponse( 'GetDoc' )
  if response == ''
    return
  endif

  call popup_hide( s:ycm_hover_popup )
  let s:ycm_hover_popup = popup_atcursor( balloon_split( response ), {} )
endfunction

" CursorHold triggers in normal mode after a delay
autocmd CursorHold * call s:Hover()
" Or, if you prefer, a mapping:
nnoremap <silent> <leader>D :call <SID>Hover()<CR>

NOTE: This is only an example, for real hover support, see g:ycm_auto_hover.

If the completer subcommand result is not a string (for example, it's a FixIt or a Location), or if the completer subcommand raises an error, an empty string is returned, so that calling code does not have to check for complex error conditions.

The arguments to the function are the same as the arguments to the :YcmCompleter ex command, e.g. the name of the subcommand, followed by any additional subcommand arguments. As with the YcmCompleter command, if the first argument is ft=<filetype> the request is targeted at the specified filetype completer. This is an advanced usage and not necessary in most cases.

NOTE: The request is run synchronously and blocks Vim until the response is received, so we do not recommend running this as part of an autocommand that triggers frequently.

The youcompleteme#GetCommandResponseAsync( callback, ... ) function

This works exactly like youcompleteme#GetCommandResponse, except that instead of returning the result, you supply a callback argument. This argument must be a FuncRef to a function taking a single argument response. This callback will be called with the command response at some point later, or immediately.

As with youcompleteme#GetCommandResponse(), this function will call the callback with '' (an empty string) if the request is not sent, or if there was some sort of error.

Here's an example that's similar to the one above:


let s:ycm_hover_popup = -1
function! s:ShowDataPopup( response ) abort
  if response == ''
    return
  endif

  call popup_hide( s:ycm_hover_popup )
  let s:ycm_hover_popup = popup_atcursor( balloon_split( response ), {} )
endfunction

function! s:GetData() abort
  call youcompleteme#GetCommandResponseAsync(
    \ function( 's:ShowDataPopup' ),
    \ 'GetDoc' )
endfunction

autocommand CursorHold * call s:GetData()

Again, see g:ycm_auto_hover for proper hover support.

NOTE: The callback may be called immediately, in the stack frame that called this function.

NOTE: Only one command request can be outstanding at once. Attempting to request a second responses while the first is outstanding will result in the second callback being immediately called with ''.

Autocommands

The YcmLocationOpened autocommand

This User autocommand is fired when YCM opens the location list window in response to the YcmDiags command. By default, the location list window is opened to the bottom of the current window and its height is set to fit all entries. This behavior can be overridden by using the YcmLocationOpened autocommand which is triggered while the cursor is in the location list window. For instance:

function! s:CustomizeYcmLocationWindow()
  " Move the window to the top of the screen.
  wincmd K
  " Set the window height to 5.
  5wincmd _
  " Switch back to working window.
  wincmd p
endfunction

autocmd User YcmLocationOpened call s:CustomizeYcmLocationWindow()

The YcmQuickFixOpened autocommand

This User autocommand is fired when YCM opens the quickfix window in response to the GoTo* and RefactorRename subcommands. By default, the quickfix window is opened to full width at the bottom of the screen and its height is set to fit all entries. This behavior can be overridden by using the YcmQuickFixOpened autocommand which is triggered while the cursor is in the quickfix window. For instance:

function! s:CustomizeYcmQuickFixWindow()
  " Move the window to the top of the screen.
  wincmd K
  " Set the window height to 5.
  5wincmd _
endfunction

autocmd User YcmQuickFixOpened call s:CustomizeYcmQuickFixWindow()

Options

All options have reasonable defaults so if the plug-in works after installation you don't need to change any options. These options can be configured in your vimrc script by including a line like this:

let g:ycm_min_num_of_chars_for_completion = 1

Note that after changing an option in your vimrc script you have to restart ycmd with the :YcmRestartServer command for the changes to take effect.

The g:ycm_min_num_of_chars_for_completion option

This option controls the number of characters the user needs to type before identifier-based completion suggestions are triggered. For example, if the option is set to 2, then when the user types a second alphanumeric character after a whitespace character, completion suggestions will be triggered. This option is NOT used for semantic completion.

Setting this option to a high number like 99 effectively turns off the identifier completion engine and just leaves the semantic engine.

Default: 2

let g:ycm_min_num_of_chars_for_completion = 2

The g:ycm_min_num_identifier_candidate_chars option

This option controls the minimum number of characters that a completion candidate coming from the identifier completer must have to be shown in the popup menu.

A special value of 0 means there is no limit.

NOTE: This option only applies to the identifier completer; it has no effect on the various semantic completers.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_min_num_identifier_candidate_chars = 0

The g:ycm_max_num_candidates option

This option controls the maximum number of semantic completion suggestions shown in the completion menu. This only applies to suggestions from semantic completion engines; see the g:ycm_max_identifier_candidates option to limit the number of suggestions from the identifier-based engine.

A special value of 0 means there is no limit.

NOTE: Setting this option to 0 or to a value greater than 100 is not recommended as it will slow down completion when there are a very large number of suggestions.

Default: 50

let g:ycm_max_num_candidates = 50

The g:ycm_max_num_candidates_to_detail option

Some completion engines require completion candidates to be 'resolved' in order to get detailed info such as inline documentation, method signatures etc. This information is displayed by YCM in the preview window, or if completeopt contains popup, in the info popup next to the completion menu.

By default, if the info popup is in use, and there are more than 10 candidates, YCM will defer resolving candidates until they are selected in the completion menu. Otherwise, YCM must resolve the details upfront, which can be costly.

If neither popup nor preview are in completeopt, YCM disables resolving altogether as the information would not be displayed.

This setting can be used to override these defaults and controls the number of completion candidates that should be resolved upfront. Typically users do not need to change this, as YCM will work out an appropriate value based on your completeopt and g:ycm_add_preview_to_completeopt settings. However, you may override this calculation by setting this value to a number:

  • -1 - Resolve all candidates up front
  • 0 - Never resolve any candidates up front.
  • > 0 - Resolve up to this many candidates up front. If the number of candidates is greater than this value, no candidates are resolved.

In the later two cases, if completeopt contains popup, then candidates are resolved on demand asynchronously.

Default:

  • 0 if neither popup nor preview are in completeopt.
  • 10 if popup is in completeopt.
  • -1 if preview is in completeopt.

Example:

let g:ycm_max_num_candidates_to_detail = 0

The g:ycm_max_num_identifier_candidates option

This option controls the maximum number of completion suggestions from the identifier-based engine shown in the completion menu.

A special value of 0 means there is no limit.

NOTE: Setting this option to 0 or to a value greater than 100 is not recommended as it will slow down completion when there are a very large number of suggestions.

Default: 10

let g:ycm_max_num_identifier_candidates = 10

The g:ycm_auto_trigger option

When set to 0, this option turns off YCM's identifier completer (the as-you-type popup) and the semantic triggers (the popup you'd get after typing . or -> in say C++). You can still force semantic completion with the <C-Space> shortcut.

If you want to just turn off the identifier completer but keep the semantic triggers, you should set g:ycm_min_num_of_chars_for_completion to a high number like 99.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_auto_trigger = 1

The g:ycm_filetype_whitelist option

This option controls for which Vim filetypes (see :h filetype) should YCM be turned on. The option value should be a Vim dictionary with keys being filetype strings (like python, cpp, etc.) and values being unimportant (the dictionary is used like a hash set, meaning that only the keys matter).

The * key is special and matches all filetypes. By default, the whitelist contains only this * key.

YCM also has a g:ycm_filetype_blacklist option that lists filetypes for which YCM shouldn't be turned on. YCM will work only in filetypes that both the whitelist and the blacklist allow (the blacklist "allows" a filetype by not having it as a key).

For example, let's assume you want YCM to work in files with the cpp filetype. The filetype should then be present in the whitelist either directly (cpp key in the whitelist) or indirectly through the special * key. It should not be present in the blacklist.

Filetypes that are blocked by the either of the lists will be completely ignored by YCM, meaning that neither the identifier-based completion engine nor the semantic engine will operate in them.

You can get the filetype of the current file in Vim with :set ft?.

Default: {'*': 1}

let g:ycm_filetype_whitelist = {'*': 1}

** Completion in buffers with no filetype **

There is one exception to the above rule. YCM supports completion in buffers with no filetype set, but this must be explicitly whitelisted. To identify buffers with no filetype, we use the ycm_nofiletype pseudo-filetype. To enable completion in buffers with no filetype, set:

let g:ycm_filetype_whitelist = {
  \ '*': 1,
  \ 'ycm_nofiletype': 1
  \ }

The g:ycm_filetype_blacklist option

This option controls for which Vim filetypes (see :h filetype) should YCM be turned off. The option value should be a Vim dictionary with keys being filetype strings (like python, cpp, etc.) and values being unimportant (the dictionary is used like a hash set, meaning that only the keys matter).

See the g:ycm_filetype_whitelist option for more details on how this works.

Default: [see next line]

let g:ycm_filetype_blacklist = {
      \ 'tagbar': 1,
      \ 'notes': 1,
      \ 'markdown': 1,
      \ 'netrw': 1,
      \ 'unite': 1,
      \ 'text': 1,
      \ 'vimwiki': 1,
      \ 'pandoc': 1,
      \ 'infolog': 1,
      \ 'leaderf': 1,
      \ 'mail': 1
      \}

In addition, ycm_nofiletype (representing buffers with no filetype set) is blacklisted if ycm_nofiletype is not explicitly whitelisted (using g:ycm_filetype_whitelist).

The g:ycm_filetype_specific_completion_to_disable option

This option controls for which Vim filetypes (see :h filetype) should the YCM semantic completion engine be turned off. The option value should be a Vim dictionary with keys being filetype strings (like python, cpp, etc.) and values being unimportant (the dictionary is used like a hash set, meaning that only the keys matter). The listed filetypes will be ignored by the YCM semantic completion engine, but the identifier-based completion engine will still trigger in files of those filetypes.

Note that even if semantic completion is not turned off for a specific filetype, you will not get semantic completion if the semantic engine does not support that filetype.

You can get the filetype of the current file in Vim with :set ft?.

Default: [see next line]

let g:ycm_filetype_specific_completion_to_disable = {
      \ 'gitcommit': 1
      \}

The g:ycm_filepath_blacklist option

This option controls for which Vim filetypes (see :h filetype) should filepath completion be disabled. The option value should be a Vim dictionary with keys being filetype strings (like python, cpp, etc.) and values being unimportant (the dictionary is used like a hash set, meaning that only the keys matter).

The * key is special and matches all filetypes. Use this key if you want to completely disable filepath completion:

let g:ycm_filepath_blacklist = {'*': 1}

You can get the filetype of the current file in Vim with :set ft?.

Default: [see next line]

let g:ycm_filepath_blacklist = {
      \ 'html': 1,
      \ 'jsx': 1,
      \ 'xml': 1,
      \}

The g:ycm_show_diagnostics_ui option

When set, this option turns on YCM's diagnostic display features. See the Diagnostic display section in the User Manual for more details.

Specific parts of the diagnostics UI (like the gutter signs, text highlighting, diagnostic echo and auto location list population) can be individually turned on or off. See the other options below for details.

Note that YCM's diagnostics UI is only supported for C-family languages.

When set, this option also makes YCM remove all Syntastic checkers set for the c, cpp, objc, objcpp, and cuda filetypes since this would conflict with YCM's own diagnostics UI.

If you're using YCM's identifier completer in C-family languages but cannot use the clang-based semantic completer for those languages and want to use the GCC Syntastic checkers, unset this option.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_show_diagnostics_ui = 1

The g:ycm_error_symbol option

YCM will use the value of this option as the symbol for errors in the Vim gutter.

This option is part of the Syntastic compatibility layer; if the option is not set, YCM will fall back to the value of the g:syntastic_error_symbol option before using this option's default.

Default: >>

let g:ycm_error_symbol = '>>'

The g:ycm_warning_symbol option

YCM will use the value of this option as the symbol for warnings in the Vim gutter.

This option is part of the Syntastic compatibility layer; if the option is not set, YCM will fall back to the value of the g:syntastic_warning_symbol option before using this option's default.

Default: >>

let g:ycm_warning_symbol = '>>'

The g:ycm_enable_diagnostic_signs option

When this option is set, YCM will put icons in Vim's gutter on lines that have a diagnostic set. Turning this off will also turn off the YcmErrorLine and YcmWarningLine highlighting.

This option is part of the Syntastic compatibility layer; if the option is not set, YCM will fall back to the value of the g:syntastic_enable_signs option before using this option's default.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_enable_diagnostic_signs = 1

The g:ycm_enable_diagnostic_highlighting option

When this option is set, YCM will highlight regions of text that are related to the diagnostic that is present on a line, if any.

This option is part of the Syntastic compatibility layer; if the option is not set, YCM will fall back to the value of the g:syntastic_enable_highlighting option before using this option's default.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_enable_diagnostic_highlighting = 1

The g:ycm_echo_current_diagnostic option

When this option is set, YCM will echo the text of the diagnostic present on the current line when you move your cursor to that line. If a FixIt is available for the current diagnostic, then (FixIt) is appended.

This option is part of the Syntastic compatibility layer; if the option is not set, YCM will fall back to the value of the g:syntastic_echo_current_error option before using this option's default.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_echo_current_diagnostic = 1

The g:ycm_auto_hover option

This option controls whether or not YCM shows documentation in a popup at the cursor location after a short delay. Only supported in Vim.

When this option is set to 'CursorHold', the popup is displayed on the CursorHold autocommand. See :help CursorHold for the details, but this means that it is displayed after updatetime milliseconds. When set to an empty string, the popup is not automatically displayed.

In addition to this setting, there is the <plug>(YCMHover) mapping, which can be used to manually trigger or hide the popup (it works like a toggle). For example:

nmap <leader>D <plug>(YCMHover)

After dismissing the popup with this mapping, it will not be automatically triggered again until the cursor is moved (i.e. CursorMoved autocommand).

The displayed documentation depends on what the completer for the current language supports. It's selected heuristically in this order of preference:

  1. GetHover with markdown syntax
  2. GetDoc with no syntax
  3. GetType with the syntax of the current file.

You can customise this by manually setting up b:ycm_hover to your liking. This buffer-local variable can be set to a dictionary with the following keys:

  • command: The YCM completer subcommand which should be run on hover
  • syntax: The syntax to use (as in set syntax=) in the popup window for highlighting.

For example, to use C/C++ syntax highlighting in the popup for C-family languages, add something like this to your vimrc:

augroup MyYCMCustom
  autocmd!
  autocmd FileType c,cpp let b:ycm_hover = {
    \ 'command': 'GetDoc',
    \ 'syntax': &filetype
    \ }
augroup END

Default: 'CursorHold'

The g:ycm_filter_diagnostics option

This option controls which diagnostics will be rendered by YCM. This option holds a dictionary of key-values, where the keys are Vim's filetype strings delimited by commas and values are dictionaries describing the filter.

A filter is a dictionary of key-values, where the keys are the type of filter, and the value is a list of arguments to that filter. In the case of just a single item in the list, you may omit the brackets and just provide the argument directly. If any filter matches a diagnostic, it will be dropped and YCM will not render it.

The following filter types are supported:

  • "regex": Accepts a string regular expression. This type matches when the regex (treated as case-insensitive) is found anywhere in the diagnostic text (re.search, not re.match)
  • "level": Accepts a string level, either "warning" or "error." This type matches when the diagnostic has the same level, that is, specifying level: "error" will remove all errors from the diagnostics.

NOTE: The regex syntax is NOT Vim's, it's Python's.

Default: {}

The following example will do, for java filetype only:

  • Remove all error level diagnostics, and,
  • Also remove anything that contains ta<something>co
let g:ycm_filter_diagnostics = {
  \ "java": {
  \      "regex": [ "ta.+co", ... ],
  \      "level": "error",
  \      ...
  \    }
  \ }

The g:ycm_always_populate_location_list option

When this option is set, YCM will populate the location list automatically every time it gets new diagnostic data. This option is off by default so as not to interfere with other data you might have placed in the location list.

See :help location-list in Vim to learn more about the location list.

This option is part of the Syntastic compatibility layer; if the option is not set, YCM will fall back to the value of the g:syntastic_always_populate_loc_list option before using this option's default.

Note: if YCM's errors aren't visible, it might be that YCM is updating an older location list. See :help :lhistory and :lolder.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_always_populate_location_list = 0

The g:ycm_open_loclist_on_ycm_diags option

When this option is set, :YcmDiags will automatically open the location list after forcing a compilation and filling the list with diagnostic data.

See :help location-list in Vim to learn more about the location list.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_open_loclist_on_ycm_diags = 1

The g:ycm_complete_in_comments option

When this option is set to 1, YCM will show the completion menu even when typing inside comments.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_complete_in_comments = 0

The g:ycm_complete_in_strings option

When this option is set to 1, YCM will show the completion menu even when typing inside strings.

Note that this is turned on by default so that you can use the filename completion inside strings. This is very useful for instance in C-family files where typing #include " will trigger the start of filename completion. If you turn off this option, you will turn off filename completion in such situations as well.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_complete_in_strings = 1

The g:ycm_collect_identifiers_from_comments_and_strings option

When this option is set to 1, YCM's identifier completer will also collect identifiers from strings and comments. Otherwise, the text in comments and strings will be ignored.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_collect_identifiers_from_comments_and_strings = 0

The g:ycm_collect_identifiers_from_tags_files option

When this option is set to 1, YCM's identifier completer will also collect identifiers from tags files. The list of tags files to examine is retrieved from the tagfiles() Vim function which examines the tags Vim option. See :h 'tags' for details.

YCM will re-index your tags files if it detects that they have been modified.

The only supported tag format is the Exuberant Ctags format. The format from "plain" ctags is NOT supported. Ctags needs to be called with the --fields=+l option (that's a lowercase L, not a one) because YCM needs the language:<lang> field in the tags output.

See the FAQ for pointers if YCM does not appear to read your tag files.

This option is off by default because it makes Vim slower if your tags are on a network directory.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_collect_identifiers_from_tags_files = 0

The g:ycm_seed_identifiers_with_syntax option

When this option is set to 1, YCM's identifier completer will seed its identifier database with the keywords of the programming language you're writing.

Since the keywords are extracted from the Vim syntax file for the filetype, all keywords may not be collected, depending on how the syntax file was written. Usually at least 95% of the keywords are successfully extracted.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_seed_identifiers_with_syntax = 0

The g:ycm_extra_conf_vim_data option

If you're using semantic completion for C-family files, this option might come handy; it's a way of sending data from Vim to your Settings function in your .ycm_extra_conf.py file.

This option is supposed to be a list of VimScript expression strings that are evaluated for every request to the ycmd server and then passed to your Settings function as a client_data keyword argument.

For instance, if you set this option to ['v:version'], your Settings function will be called like this:

# The '801' value is of course contingent on Vim 8.1; in 8.0 it would be '800'
Settings( ..., client_data = { 'v:version': 801 } )

So the client_data parameter is a dictionary mapping Vim expression strings to their values at the time of the request.

The correct way to define parameters for your Settings function:

def Settings( **kwargs ):

You can then get to client_data with kwargs['client_data'].

Default: []

let g:ycm_extra_conf_vim_data = []

The g:ycm_server_python_interpreter option

YCM will by default search for an appropriate Python interpreter on your system. You can use this option to override that behavior and force the use of a specific interpreter of your choosing.

NOTE: This interpreter is only used for the ycmd server. The YCM client running inside Vim always uses the Python interpreter that's embedded inside Vim.

Default: ''

let g:ycm_server_python_interpreter = ''

The g:ycm_keep_logfiles option

When this option is set to 1, YCM and the ycmd completion server will keep the logfiles around after shutting down (they are deleted on shutdown by default).

To see where the logfiles are, call :YcmDebugInfo.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_keep_logfiles = 0

The g:ycm_log_level option

The logging level that YCM and the ycmd completion server use. Valid values are the following, from most verbose to least verbose:

  • debug
  • info
  • warning
  • error
  • critical

Note that debug is very verbose.

Default: info

let g:ycm_log_level = 'info'

The g:ycm_auto_start_csharp_server option

When set to 1, the OmniSharp-Roslyn server will be automatically started (once per Vim session) when you open a C# file.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_auto_start_csharp_server = 1

The g:ycm_auto_stop_csharp_server option

When set to 1, the OmniSharp-Roslyn server will be automatically stopped upon closing Vim.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_auto_stop_csharp_server = 1

The g:ycm_csharp_server_port option

When g:ycm_auto_start_csharp_server is set to 1, specifies the port for the OmniSharp-Roslyn server to listen on. When set to 0 uses an unused port provided by the OS.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_csharp_server_port = 0

The g:ycm_csharp_insert_namespace_expr option

By default, when YCM inserts a namespace, it will insert the using statement under the nearest using statement. You may prefer that the using statement is inserted somewhere, for example, to preserve sorting. If so, you can set this option to override this behavior.

When this option is set, instead of inserting the using statement itself, YCM will set the global variable g:ycm_namespace_to_insert to the namespace to insert, and then evaluate this option's value as an expression. The option's expression is responsible for inserting the namespace - the default insertion will not occur.

Default: ''

let g:ycm_csharp_insert_namespace_expr = ''

The g:ycm_add_preview_to_completeopt option

When this option is set to 1, YCM will add the preview string to Vim's completeopt option (see :h completeopt). If your completeopt option already has preview set, there will be no effect. Alternatively, when set to popup and your version of Vim supports popup windows (see :help popup), the popup string will be used instead. You can see the current state of your completeopt setting with :set completeopt? (yes, the question mark is important).

When preview is present in completeopt, YCM will use the preview window at the top of the file to store detailed information about the current completion candidate (but only if the candidate came from the semantic engine). For instance, it would show the full function prototype and all the function overloads in the window if the current completion is a function name.

When popup is present in completeopt, YCM will instead use a popup window to the side of the completion popup for storing detailed information about the current completion candidate. In addition, YCM may truncate the detailed completion information in order to give the popup sufficient room to display that detailed information.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_add_preview_to_completeopt = 0

The g:ycm_autoclose_preview_window_after_completion option

When this option is set to 1, YCM will auto-close the preview window after the user accepts the offered completion string. If there is no preview window triggered because there is no preview string in completeopt, this option is irrelevant. See the g:ycm_add_preview_to_completeopt option for more details.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_autoclose_preview_window_after_completion = 0

The g:ycm_autoclose_preview_window_after_insertion option

When this option is set to 1, YCM will auto-close the preview window after the user leaves insert mode. This option is irrelevant if g:ycm_autoclose_preview_window_after_completion is set or if no preview window is triggered. See the g:ycm_add_preview_to_completeopt option for more details.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_autoclose_preview_window_after_insertion = 0

The g:ycm_max_diagnostics_to_display option

This option controls the maximum number of diagnostics shown to the user when errors or warnings are detected in the file. This option is only relevant for the C-family, C#, Java, JavaScript, and TypeScript languages.

A special value of 0 means there is no limit.

Default: 30

let g:ycm_max_diagnostics_to_display = 30

The g:ycm_key_list_select_completion option

This option controls the key mappings used to select the first completion string. Invoking any of them repeatedly cycles forward through the completion list.

Some users like adding <Enter> to this list.

Default: ['<TAB>', '<Down>']

let g:ycm_key_list_select_completion = ['<TAB>', '<Down>']

The g:ycm_key_list_previous_completion option

This option controls the key mappings used to select the previous completion string. Invoking any of them repeatedly cycles backwards through the completion list.

Note that one of the defaults is <S-TAB> which means Shift-TAB. That mapping will probably only work in GUI Vim (Gvim or MacVim) and not in plain console Vim because the terminal usually does not forward modifier key combinations to Vim.

Default: ['<S-TAB>', '<Up>']

let g:ycm_key_list_previous_completion = ['<S-TAB>', '<Up>']

The g:ycm_key_list_stop_completion option

This option controls the key mappings used to close the completion menu. This is useful when the menu is blocking the view, when you need to insert the <TAB> character, or when you want to expand a snippet from UltiSnips and navigate through it.

Default: ['<C-y>']

let g:ycm_key_list_stop_completion = ['<C-y>']

The g:ycm_key_invoke_completion option

This option controls the key mapping used to invoke the completion menu for semantic completion. By default, semantic completion is triggered automatically after typing ., -> and :: in insert mode (if semantic completion support has been compiled in). This key mapping can be used to trigger semantic completion anywhere. Useful for searching for top-level functions and classes.

Console Vim (not Gvim or MacVim) passes <Nul> to Vim when the user types <C-Space> so YCM will make sure that <Nul> is used in the map command when you're editing in console Vim, and <C-Space> in GUI Vim. This means that you can just press <C-Space> in both console and GUI Vim and YCM will do the right thing.

Setting this option to an empty string will make sure no mapping is created.

Default: <C-Space>

let g:ycm_key_invoke_completion = '<C-Space>'

The g:ycm_key_detailed_diagnostics option

This option controls the key mapping used to show the full diagnostic text when the user's cursor is on the line with the diagnostic. It basically calls :YcmShowDetailedDiagnostic.

Setting this option to an empty string will make sure no mapping is created.

Default: <leader>d

let g:ycm_key_detailed_diagnostics = '<leader>d'

The g:ycm_global_ycm_extra_conf option

Normally, YCM searches for a .ycm_extra_conf.py file for compilation flags (see the User Guide for more details on how this works). This option specifies a fallback path to a config file which is used if no .ycm_extra_conf.py is found.

You can place such a global file anywhere in your filesystem.

Default: ''

let g:ycm_global_ycm_extra_conf = ''

The g:ycm_confirm_extra_conf option

When this option is set to 1 YCM will ask once per .ycm_extra_conf.py file if it is safe to be loaded. This is to prevent execution of malicious code from a .ycm_extra_conf.py file you didn't write.

To selectively get YCM to ask/not ask about loading certain .ycm_extra_conf.py files, see the g:ycm_extra_conf_globlist option.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_confirm_extra_conf = 1

The g:ycm_extra_conf_globlist option

This option is a list that may contain several globbing patterns. If a pattern starts with a ! all .ycm_extra_conf.py files matching that pattern will be blacklisted, that is they won't be loaded and no confirmation dialog will be shown. If a pattern does not start with a ! all files matching that pattern will be whitelisted. Note that this option is not used when confirmation is disabled using g:ycm_confirm_extra_conf and that items earlier in the list will take precedence over the later ones.

Rules:

  • * matches everything
  • ? matches any single character
  • [seq] matches any character in seq
  • [!seq] matches any char not in seq

Example:

let g:ycm_extra_conf_globlist = ['~/dev/*','!~/*']
  • The first rule will match everything contained in the ~/dev directory so .ycm_extra_conf.py files from there will be loaded.
  • The second rule will match everything in the home directory so a .ycm_extra_conf.py file from there won't be loaded.
  • As the first rule takes precedence everything in the home directory excluding the ~/dev directory will be blacklisted.

NOTE: The glob pattern is first expanded with Python's os.path.expanduser() and then resolved with os.path.abspath() before being matched against the filename.

Default: []

let g:ycm_extra_conf_globlist = []

The g:ycm_filepath_completion_use_working_dir option

By default, YCM's filepath completion will interpret relative paths like ../ as being relative to the folder of the file of the currently active buffer. Setting this option will force YCM to always interpret relative paths as being relative to Vim's current working directory.

Default: 0

let g:ycm_filepath_completion_use_working_dir = 0

The g:ycm_semantic_triggers option

This option controls the character-based triggers for the various semantic completion engines. The option holds a dictionary of key-values, where the keys are Vim's filetype strings delimited by commas and values are lists of strings, where the strings are the triggers.

Setting key-value pairs on the dictionary adds semantic triggers to the internal default set (listed below). You cannot remove the default triggers, only add new ones.

A "trigger" is a sequence of one or more characters that trigger semantic completion when typed. For instance, C++ (cpp filetype) has . listed as a trigger. So when the user types foo., the semantic engine will trigger and serve foo's list of member functions and variables. Since C++ also has -> listed as a trigger, the same thing would happen when the user typed foo->.

It's also possible to use a regular expression as a trigger. You have to prefix your trigger with re! to signify it's a regex trigger. For instance, re!\w+\. would only trigger after the \w+\. regex matches.

NOTE: The regex syntax is NOT Vim's, it's Python's.

Default: [see next line]

let g:ycm_semantic_triggers =  {
  \   'c': ['->', '.'],
  \   'objc': ['->', '.', 're!\[[_a-zA-Z]+\w*\s', 're!^\s*[^\W\d]\w*\s',
  \            're!\[.*\]\s'],
  \   'ocaml': ['.', '#'],
  \   'cpp,cuda,objcpp': ['->', '.', '::'],
  \   'perl': ['->'],
  \   'php': ['->', '::'],
  \   'cs,d,elixir,go,groovy,java,javascript,julia,perl6,python,scala,typescript,vb': ['.'],
  \   'ruby,rust': ['.', '::'],
  \   'lua': ['.', ':'],
  \   'erlang': [':'],
  \ }

The g:ycm_cache_omnifunc option

Some omnicompletion engines do not work well with the YCM cache—in particular, they might not produce all possible results for a given prefix. By unsetting this option you can ensure that the omnicompletion engine is re-queried on every keypress. That will ensure all completions will be presented, but might cause stuttering and lagginess if the omnifunc is slow.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_cache_omnifunc = 1

The g:ycm_use_ultisnips_completer option

By default, YCM will query the UltiSnips plugin for possible completions of snippet triggers. This option can turn that behavior off.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_use_ultisnips_completer = 1

The g:ycm_goto_buffer_command option

Defines where GoTo* commands result should be opened. Can take one of the following values: 'same-buffer', 'split', or 'split-or-existing-window'. If this option is set to the 'same-buffer' but current buffer can not be switched (when buffer is modified and nohidden option is set), then result will be opened in a split. When the option is set to 'split-or-existing-window', if the result is already open in a window of the current tab page (or any tab pages with the :tab modifier; see below), it will jump to that window. Otherwise, the result will be opened in a split as if the option was set to 'split'.

To customize the way a new window is split, prefix the GoTo* command with one of the following modifiers: :aboveleft, :belowright, :botright, :leftabove, :rightbelow, :topleft, and :vertical. For instance, to split vertically to the right of the current window, run the command:

:rightbelow vertical YcmCompleter GoTo

To open in a new tab page, use the :tab modifier with the 'split' or 'split-or-existing-window' options e.g.:

:tab YcmCompleter GoTo

Default: 'same-buffer'

let g:ycm_goto_buffer_command = 'same-buffer'

The g:ycm_disable_for_files_larger_than_kb option

Defines the max size (in Kb) for a file to be considered for completion. If this option is set to 0 then no check is made on the size of the file you're opening.

Default: 1000

let g:ycm_disable_for_files_larger_than_kb = 1000

The g:ycm_use_clangd option

This option controls whether clangd should be used as completion engine for C-family languages. Can take one of the following values: 1, 0, with meanings:

  • 1: YCM will use clangd if clangd binary exists in third party or it was provided with ycm_clangd_binary_path option.
  • 0: YCM will never use clangd completer.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_use_clangd = 1

The g:ycm_clangd_binary_path option

When ycm_use_clangd option is set to 1, this option sets the path to clangd binary.

Default: ''

let g:ycm_clangd_binary_path = ''

The g:ycm_clangd_args option

This option controls the command line arguments passed to the clangd binary. It appends new options and overrides the existing ones.

Default: []

let g:ycm_clangd_args = []

The g:ycm_clangd_uses_ycmd_caching option

This option controls which ranking and filtering algorithm to use for completion items. It can take values:

  • 1: Uses ycmd's caching and filtering logic.
  • 0: Uses clangd's caching and filtering logic.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_clangd_uses_ycmd_caching = 1

The g:ycm_language_server option

This option lets YCM use an arbitrary Language Server Protocol (LSP) server, not unlike many other completion systems. The officially supported completers are favoured over custom LSP ones, so overriding an existing completer means first making sure YCM won't choose that existing completer in the first place.

A simple working example of this option can be found in the section called "Semantic Completion for Other Languages".

Many working examples can be found in the YCM lsp-examples repo.

Default: []

let g:ycm_language_server = []

The g:ycm_disable_signature_help option

This option allows you to disable all signature help for all completion engines. There is no way to disable it per-completer. This option is reserved, meaning that while signature help support remains experimental, its values and meaning may change and it may be removed in a future version.

Default: 0

" Disable signature help
let g:ycm_disable_signature_help = 1

The g:ycm_gopls_binary_path option

In case the system-wide gopls binary is newer than the bundled one, setting this option to the path of the system-wide gopls would make YCM use that one instead.

If the path is just gopls, YCM will search in $PATH.

The g:ycm_gopls_args option

Similar to the g:ycm_clangd_args, this option allows passing additional flags to the gopls command line.

Default: []

let g:ycm_gopls_args = []

The g:ycm_rls_binary_path and g:ycm_rustc_binary_path options

YCM no longer uses RLS for rust, and these options are therefore no longer supported.

To use a custom rust-analyzer, see g:ycm_rust_toolchain_root.

The g:ycm_rust_toolchain_root option

Optionally specify the path to a custom rust toolchain including at least a supported version of rust-analyzer.

The g:ycm_tsserver_binary_path option

Similar to the gopls path, this option tells YCM where is the TSServer executable located.

The g:ycm_roslyn_binary_path option

Similar to the gopls path, this option tells YCM where is the Omnisharp-Roslyn executable located.

The g:ycm_update_diagnostics_in_insert_mode option

With async diagnostics, LSP servers might send new diagnostics mid-typing. If seeing these new diagnostics while typing is not desired, this option can be set to 0.

Default: 1

let g:ycm_update_diagnostics_in_insert_mode = 1

FAQ

The FAQ section has been moved to the wiki.

Contributor Code of Conduct

Please note that this project is released with a Contributor Code of Conduct. By participating in this project you agree to abide by its terms.

Contact

If you have questions about the plugin or need help, please join the Gitter room or use the ycm-users mailing list.

If you have bug reports or feature suggestions, please use the issue tracker. Before you do, please carefully read CONTRIBUTING.md as this asks for important diagnostics which the team will use to help get you going.

The latest version of the plugin is available at https://ycm-core.github.io/YouCompleteMe/.

The author's homepage is https://val.markovic.io.

Please do NOT go to #vim on freenode for support. Please contact the YouCompleteMe maintainers directly using the contact details.

License

This software is licensed under the GPL v3 license. © 2015-2018 YouCompleteMe contributors

Sponsorship

If you like YCM so much that you're wiling to part with your hard-earned cash, please consider donating to one of the following charities, which are meaningful to the current maintainers (in no particular order):

Please note: The YCM maintainers do not specifically endorse nor necessarily have any relationship with the above charities. Disclosure: It is noted that one key maintainer is family with Trustees of Greyhound Rescue Wales.

Author: ycm-core
Source Code: https://github.com/ycm-core/YouCompleteMe
License: GPL-3.0 License

#python #vim 

Reid  Rohan

Reid Rohan

1667158440

Vim: Vim for Visual Studio Code

VSCodeVim

Vim emulation for Visual Studio Code

VSCodeVim is a Vim emulator for Visual Studio Code.

  • 🚚 For a full list of supported Vim features, please refer to our roadmap.
  • 📃 Our change log outlines the breaking/major/minor updates between releases.
  • ❓ If you need to ask any questions, join us on Slack
  • Report missing features/bugs on GitHub.

💾 Installation

VSCodeVim can be installed via the VS Code Marketplace.

Mac

To enable key-repeating, execute the following in your Terminal, log out and back in, and then restart VS Code:

$ defaults write com.microsoft.VSCode ApplePressAndHoldEnabled -bool false              # For VS Code
$ defaults write com.microsoft.VSCodeInsiders ApplePressAndHoldEnabled -bool false      # For VS Code Insider
$ defaults write com.visualstudio.code.oss ApplePressAndHoldEnabled -bool false         # For VS Codium
$ defaults write com.microsoft.VSCodeExploration ApplePressAndHoldEnabled -bool false   # For VS Codium Exploration users
$ defaults delete -g ApplePressAndHoldEnabled                                           # If necessary, reset global default

We also recommend increasing Key Repeat and Delay Until Repeat settings in System Preferences -> Keyboard.

Windows

Like real vim, VSCodeVim will take over your control keys. This behavior can be adjusted with the useCtrlKeys and handleKeys settings.

⚙️ Settings

The settings documented here are a subset of the supported settings; the full list is described in the Contributions tab of VSCodeVim's extension details page, which can be found in the extensions view of VS Code.

Quick Example

Below is an example of a settings.json file with settings relevant to VSCodeVim:

{
  "vim.easymotion": true,
  "vim.incsearch": true,
  "vim.useSystemClipboard": true,
  "vim.useCtrlKeys": true,
  "vim.hlsearch": true,
  "vim.insertModeKeyBindings": [
    {
      "before": ["j", "j"],
      "after": ["<Esc>"]
    }
  ],
  "vim.normalModeKeyBindingsNonRecursive": [
    {
      "before": ["<leader>", "d"],
      "after": ["d", "d"]
    },
    {
      "before": ["<C-n>"],
      "commands": [":nohl"]
    },
    {
      "before": ["K"],
      "commands": ["lineBreakInsert"],
      "silent": true
    }
  ],
  "vim.leader": "<space>",
  "vim.handleKeys": {
    "<C-a>": false,
    "<C-f>": false
  }
}

VSCodeVim settings

These settings are specific to VSCodeVim.

SettingDescriptionTypeDefault Value
vim.changeWordIncludesWhitespaceInclude trailing whitespace when changing word. This configures the cw action to act consistently as its siblings (yw and dw) instead of acting as ce.Booleanfalse
vim.cursorStylePerMode.{Mode}Configure a specific cursor style for {Mode}. Omitted modes will use default cursor type Supported cursors: line, block, underline, line-thin, block-outline, and underline-thin.StringNone
vim.digraphs.{shorthand}Set custom digraph shorthands that can override the default ones. Entries should map a two-character shorthand to a descriptive string and one or more UTF16 code points. Example: "R!": ["🚀", [55357, 56960]]Object{"R!": ["🚀", [0xD83D, 0xDE80]]
vim.debug.silentBoolean indicating whether log messages will be suppressed.Booleanfalse
vim.debug.loggingLevelForConsoleMaximum level of messages to log to console. Logs are visible in the developer tools. Supported values: 'error', 'warn', 'info', 'verbose', 'debug').Stringerror
vim.debug.loggingLevelForAlertMaximum level of messages to present as VS Code information window. Supported values: 'error', 'warn', 'info', 'verbose', 'debug').Stringerror
vim.disableExtensionDisable VSCodeVim extension. This setting can also be toggled using toggleVim command in the Command PaletteBooleanfalse
vim.handleKeysDelegate configured keys to be handled by VS Code instead of by the VSCodeVim extension. Any key in keybindings section of the package.json that has a vim.use<C-...> in the when argument can be delegated back to VS Code by setting "<C-...>": false. Example: to use ctrl+f for find (native VS Code behavior): "vim.handleKeys": { "<C-f>": false }.String"<C-d>": true
"<C-s>": false
"<C-z>": false
vim.overrideCopyOverride VS Code's copy command with our own, which works correctly with VSCodeVim. If cmd-c/ctrl-c is giving you issues, set this to false and complain here.Booleanfalse
vim.useSystemClipboardUse the system clipboard register (*) as the default registerBooleanfalse
vim.searchHighlightColorBackground color of non-current search matchesStringfindMatchHighlightBackground ThemeColor
vim.searchHighlightTextColorForeground color of non-current search matchesStringNone
vim.searchMatchColorBackground color of current search matchStringfindMatchBackground ThemeColor
vim.searchMatchTextColorForeground color of current search matchStringNone
vim.substitutionColorBackground color of substitution text when vim.inccommand is enabledString"#50f01080"
vim.substitutionTextColorForeground color of substitution text when vim.inccommand is enabledStringNone
vim.startInInsertModeStart in Insert mode instead of Normal ModeBooleanfalse
vim.useCtrlKeysEnable Vim ctrl keys overriding common VS Code operations such as copy, paste, find, etc.Booleantrue
vim.visualstarIn visual mode, start a search with * or # using the current selectionBooleanfalse
vim.highlightedyank.enableEnable highlighting when yankingBooleanfalse
vim.highlightedyank.colorSet the color of yank highlightsStringrgba(250, 240, 170, 0.5)
vim.highlightedyank.durationSet the duration of yank highlightsNumber200

Neovim Integration

:warning: Experimental feature. Please leave feedback on neovim integration here.

To leverage neovim for Ex-commands,

  1. Install neovim
  2. Modify the following configurations:
SettingDescriptionTypeDefault Value
vim.enableNeovimEnable NeovimBooleanfalse
vim.neovimPathFull path to neovim executable. If left empty, PATH environment variable will be automatically checked for neovim path.String 
vim.neovimUseConfigFileIf true, Neovim will load a config file specified by vim.neovimConfigPath. This is necessary if you want Neovim to be able to use its own plugins.Booleanfalse
vim.neovimConfigPathPath that Neovim will load as config file. If left blank, Neovim will search in its default location.String 

Here's some ideas on what you can do with neovim integration:

Key Remapping

Custom remappings are defined on a per-mode basis.

"vim.insertModeKeyBindings"/"vim.normalModeKeyBindings"/"vim.visualModeKeyBindings"/"vim.operatorPendingModeKeyBindings"

  • Keybinding overrides to use for insert, normal, operatorPending and visual modes.
  • Keybinding overrides can include "before", "after", "commands", and "silent".
  • Bind jj to <Esc> in insert mode:
    "vim.insertModeKeyBindings": [
        {
            "before": ["j", "j"],
            "after": ["<Esc>"]
        }
    ]
  • Bind £ to goto previous whole word under cursor:
    "vim.normalModeKeyBindings": [
        {
            "before": ["£"],
            "after": ["#"]
        }
    ]
  • Bind : to show the command palette, and don't show the message on the status bar:
    "vim.normalModeKeyBindings": [
        {
            "before": [":"],
            "commands": [
                "workbench.action.showCommands",
            ],
            "silent": true
        }
    ]
  • Bind <leader>m to add a bookmark and <leader>b to open the list of all bookmarks (using the Bookmarks extension):
    "vim.normalModeKeyBindings": [
        {
            "before": ["<leader>", "m"],
            "commands": [
                "bookmarks.toggle"
            ]
        },
        {
            "before": ["<leader>", "b"],
            "commands": [
                "bookmarks.list"
            ]
        }
    ]
  • Bind ctrl+n to turn off search highlighting and <leader>w to save the current file:
    "vim.normalModeKeyBindings": [
        {
            "before":["<C-n>"],
            "commands": [
                ":nohl",
            ]
        },
        {
            "before": ["leader", "w"],
            "commands": [
                "workbench.action.files.save",
            ]
        }
    ]
  • Bind { to w in operator pending mode makes y{ and d{ work like yw and dw respectively:
    "vim.operatorPendingModeKeyBindings": [
        {
            "before": ["{"],
            "after": ["w"]
        }
    ]
  • Bind L to $ and H to ^ in operator pending mode makes yL and dH work like y$ and d^ respectively:
    "vim.operatorPendingModeKeyBindings": [
        {
            "before": ["L"],
            "after": ["$"]
        },
        {
            "before": ["H"],
            "after": ["^"]
        }
    ]
  • Bind > and < in visual mode to indent/outdent lines (repeatable):
    "vim.visualModeKeyBindings": [
        {
            "before": [
                ">"
            ],
            "commands": [
                "editor.action.indentLines"
            ]
        },
        {
            "before": [
                "<"
            ],
            "commands": [
                "editor.action.outdentLines"
            ]
        },
    ]
  • Bind <leader>vim to clone this repository to the selected location:
    "vim.visualModeKeyBindings": [
        {
            "before": [
                "<leader>", "v", "i", "m"
            ],
            "commands": [
                {
                    "command": "git.clone",
                    "args": [ "https://github.com/VSCodeVim/Vim.git" ]
                }
            ]
        }
    ]

"vim.insertModeKeyBindingsNonRecursive"/"normalModeKeyBindingsNonRecursive"/"visualModeKeyBindingsNonRecursive"/"operatorPendingModeKeyBindingsNonRecursive"

  • Non-recursive keybinding overrides to use for insert, normal, and visual modes
  • Example: Exchange the meaning of two keys like j to k and k to j to exchange the cursor up and down commands. Notice that if you attempted this binding normally, the j would be replaced with k and the k would be replaced with j, on and on forever. When this happens 'maxmapdepth' times (default 1000) the error message 'E223 Recursive Mapping' will be thrown. Stop this recursive expansion using the NonRecursive variation of the keybindings:
    "vim.normalModeKeyBindingsNonRecursive": [
        {
            "before": ["j"],
            "after": ["k"]
        },
        {
            "before": ["k"],
            "after": ["j"]
        }
    ]
  • Bind ( to 'i(' in operator pending mode makes 'y(' and 'c(' work like 'yi(' and 'ci(' respectively:
    "vim.operatorPendingModeKeyBindingsNonRecursive": [
        {
            "before": ["("],
            "after": ["i("]
        }
    ]
  • Bind p in visual mode to paste without overriding the current register:
    "vim.visualModeKeyBindingsNonRecursive": [
        {
            "before": [
                "p",
            ],
            "after": [
                "p",
                "g",
                "v",
                "y"
            ]
        }
    ],

Debugging Remappings

Are your configurations correct?

Adjust the extension's logging level to 'debug', restart VS Code. As each remapped configuration is loaded, it is outputted to console. In the Developer Tools console, do you see any errors?

Misconfigured configurations are ignored.

debug: Remapper: normalModeKeyBindingsNonRecursive. before=0. after=^.
debug: Remapper: insertModeKeyBindings. before=j,j. after=<Esc>.
error: Remapper: insertModeKeyBindings. Invalid configuration. Missing 'after' key or 'command'. before=j,k.

Does the extension handle the keys you are trying to remap?

VSCodeVim explicitly instructs VS Code which key events we care about through the package.json. If the key you are trying to remap is a key in which vim/vscodevim generally does not handle, then it's most likely that this extension does not receive those key events from VS Code. With logging level adjusted to 'debug', as you press keys, you should see output similar to:

As you press the key that you are trying to remap, do you see it outputted here? If not, it means we don't subscribe to those key events. It is still possible to remap those keys by using VSCode's keybindings.json (see next section: Remapping more complex key combinations).

debug: ModeHandler: handling key=A.
debug: ModeHandler: handling key=l.
debug: ModeHandler: handling key=<BS>.
debug: ModeHandler: handling key=<C-a>.

Remapping more complex key combinations

It is highly recommended to remap keys using vim commands like "vim.normalModeKeyBindings" (see here). But sometimes the usual remapping commands are not enough as they do not support every key combinations possible (for example Alt+key or Ctrl+Shift+key). In this case it is possible to create new keybindings inside keybindings.json. To do so: open up keybindings.json in VSCode using CTRL+SHIFT+P and select Open keyboard shortcuts (JSON).

You can then add a new entry to the keybindings like so:

{
  "key": "YOUR_KEY_COMBINATION",
  "command": "vim.remap",
  "when": "inputFocus && vim.mode == 'VIM_MODE_YOU_WANT_TO_REBIND'",
  "args": {
    "after": ["YOUR_VIM_ACTION"]
  }
}

For example, to rebind ctrl+shift+y to VSCodeVim's yy (yank line) in normal mode, add this to your keybindings.json:

{
  "key": "ctrl+shift+y",
  "command": "vim.remap",
  "when": "inputFocus && vim.mode == 'Normal'",
  "args": {
    "after": ["y", "y"],
  }
}

If keybindings.json is empty the first time you open it, make sure to add opening [ and closing ] square brackets to the file as the keybindings should be inside a JSON Array.

Vim modes

Here are all the modes used by VSCodeVim:

Mode
Normal
Insert
Visual
VisualBlock
VisualLine
SearchInProgressMode
CommandlineInProgress
Replace
EasyMotionMode
EasyMotionInputMode
SurroundInputMode
OperatorPendingMode
Disabled

When rebinding keys in keybindings.json using "when clause context", it can be useful to know in which mode vim currently is. For example to write a "when clause" that checks if vim is currently in normal mode or visual mode it is possible to write the following:

"when": "vim.mode == 'Normal' || vim.mode == 'Visual'",

Vim settings

Configuration settings that have been copied from vim. Vim settings are loaded in the following sequence:

  1. :set {setting}
  2. vim.{setting} from user/workspace settings.
  3. VS Code settings
  4. VSCodeVim default values
SettingDescriptionTypeDefault Value
vim.autoindentCopy indent from current line when starting a new lineBooleantrue
vim.gdefaultWhen on, the :substitute flag g is default on. This means that all matches in a line are substituted instead of one. When a g flag is given to a :substitute command, this will toggle the substitution of all or one match.Booleanfalse
vim.hlsearchHighlights all text matching current searchBooleanfalse
vim.ignorecaseIgnore case in search patternsBooleantrue
vim.incsearchShow the next match while entering a searchBooleantrue
vim.inccommandShow the effects of the :substitute command while typingStringreplace
vim.joinspacesAdd two spaces after '.', '?', and '!' when joining or reformattingBooleantrue
vim.leaderDefines key for <leader> to be used in key remappingsString\
vim.maxmapdepthMaximum number of times a mapping is done without resulting in a character to be used. This normally catches endless mappings, like ":map x y" with ":map y x". It still does not catch ":map g wg", because the 'w' is used before the next mapping is done.Number1000
vim.reportThreshold for reporting number of lines changed.Number2
vim.shellPath to the shell to use for ! and :! commands.String/bin/sh on Unix, %COMSPEC% environment variable on Windows
vim.showcmdShow (partial) command in status barBooleantrue
vim.showmodenameShow name of current mode in status barBooleantrue
vim.smartcaseOverride the 'ignorecase' setting if search pattern contains uppercase charactersBooleantrue
vim.textwidthWidth to word-wrap when using gqNumber80
vim.timeoutTimeout in milliseconds for remapped commandsNumber1000
vim.whichwrapAllow specified keys that move the cursor left/right to move to the previous/next line when the cursor is on the first/last character in the line. See :help whichwrap.Stringb,s

.vimrc support

:warning: .vimrc support is currently experimental. Only remaps are supported, and you may experience bugs. Please report them!

Set vim.vimrc.enable to true and set vim.vimrc.path appropriately.

🖱️ Multi-Cursor Mode

:warning: Multi-Cursor mode is experimental. Please report issues in our feedback thread.

Enter multi-cursor mode by:

  • On OSX, cmd-d. On Windows, ctrl-d.
  • gb, a new shortcut we added which is equivalent to cmd-d (OSX) or ctrl-d (Windows). It adds another cursor at the next word that matches the word the cursor is currently on.
  • Running "Add Cursor Above/Below" or the shortcut on any platform.

Once you have multiple cursors, you should be able to use Vim commands as you see fit. Most should work; some are unsupported (ref PR#587).

  • Each cursor has its own clipboard.
  • Pressing Escape in Multi-Cursor Visual Mode will bring you to Multi-Cursor Normal mode. Pressing it again will return you to Normal mode.

🔌 Emulated Plugins

vim-airline

:warning: There are performance implications to using this plugin. In order to change the status bar, we override the configurations in your workspace settings.json which results in increased latency and a constant changing diff in your working directory (see issue#2124).

Change the color of the status bar based on the current mode. Once enabled, configure "vim.statusBarColors". Colors can be defined for each mode either as string (background only), or string[] (background, foreground).

    "vim.statusBarColorControl": true,
    "vim.statusBarColors.normal": ["#8FBCBB", "#434C5E"],
    "vim.statusBarColors.insert": "#BF616A",
    "vim.statusBarColors.visual": "#B48EAD",
    "vim.statusBarColors.visualline": "#B48EAD",
    "vim.statusBarColors.visualblock": "#A3BE8C",
    "vim.statusBarColors.replace": "#D08770",
    "vim.statusBarColors.commandlineinprogress": "#007ACC",
    "vim.statusBarColors.searchinprogressmode": "#007ACC",
    "vim.statusBarColors.easymotionmode": "#007ACC",
    "vim.statusBarColors.easymotioninputmode": "#007ACC",
    "vim.statusBarColors.surroundinputmode": "#007ACC",

vim-easymotion

Based on vim-easymotion and configured through the following settings:

SettingDescriptionTypeDefault Value
vim.easymotionEnable/disable easymotion pluginBooleanfalse
vim.easymotionMarkerBackgroundColorThe background color of the marker box.String'#0000'
vim.easymotionMarkerForegroundColorOneCharThe font color for one-character markers.String'#ff0000'
vim.easymotionMarkerForegroundColorTwoCharFirstThe font color for the first of two-character markers, used to differentiate from one-character markers.String'#ffb400'
vim.easymotionMarkerForegroundColorTwoCharSecondThe font color for the second of two-character markers, used to differentiate consecutive markers.String'#b98300'
vim.easymotionIncSearchForegroundColorThe font color for the search n-character command, used to highlight the matches.String'#7fbf00'
vim.easymotionDimColorThe font color for the dimmed characters, used when #vim.easymotionDimBackground# is set to true.String'#777777'
vim.easymotionDimBackgroundWhether to dim other text while markers are visible.Booleantrue
vim.easymotionMarkerFontWeightThe font weight used for the marker text.String'bold'
vim.easymotionKeysThe characters used for jump marker nameString'hklyuiopnm,qwertzxcvbasdgjf;'
vim.easymotionJumpToAnywhereRegexCustom regex to match for JumpToAnywhere motion (analogous to Easymotion_re_anywhere). Example setting (which also matches start & end of line, as well as Javascript comments in addition to the regular behavior (note the double escaping required): ^\s*.\b[A-Za-z0-9][A-Za-z0-9]\b

Once easymotion is active, initiate motions using the following commands. After you initiate the motion, text decorators/markers will be displayed and you can press the keys displayed to jump to that position. leader is configurable and is \ by default.

Motion CommandDescription
<leader><leader> s <char>Search character
<leader><leader> f <char>Find character forwards
<leader><leader> F <char>Find character backwards
<leader><leader> t <char>Til character forwards
<leader><leader> T <char>Til character backwards
<leader><leader> wStart of word forwards
<leader><leader> bStart of word backwards
<leader><leader> lMatches beginning & ending of word, camelCase, after _, and after # forwards
<leader><leader> hMatches beginning & ending of word, camelCase, after _, and after # backwards
<leader><leader> eEnd of word forwards
<leader><leader> geEnd of word backwards
<leader><leader> jStart of line forwards
<leader><leader> kStart of line backwards
<leader><leader> / <char>... <CR>Search n-character
<leader><leader><leader> bdtTil character
<leader><leader><leader> bdwStart of word
<leader><leader><leader> bdeEnd of word
<leader><leader><leader> bdjkStart of line
<leader><leader><leader> jJumpToAnywhere motion; default behavior matches beginning & ending of word, camelCase, after _ and after #

<leader><leader> (2s|2f|2F|2t|2T) <char><char> and <leader><leader><leader> bd2t <char>char> are also available. The difference is character count required for search. For example, <leader><leader> 2s <char><char> requires two characters, and search by two characters. This mapping is not a standard mapping, so it is recommended to use your custom mapping.

vim-surround

Based on surround.vim, the plugin is used to work with surrounding characters like parentheses, brackets, quotes, and XML tags.

SettingDescriptionTypeDefault Value
vim.surroundEnable/disable vim-surroundBooleantrue

t or < as <desired> or <existing> will enter tag entry mode. Using <CR> instead of > to finish changing a tag will preserve any existing attributes.

Surround CommandDescription
y s <motion> <desired>Add desired surround around text defined by <motion>
d s <existing>Delete existing surround
c s <existing> <desired>Change existing surround to desired
S <desired>Surround when in visual modes (surrounds full selection)

Some examples:

  • "test" with cursor inside quotes type cs"' to end up with 'test'
  • "test" with cursor inside quotes type ds" to end up with test
  • "test" with cursor inside quotes type cs"t and enter 123> to end up with <123>test</123>

vim-commentary

Similar to vim-commentary, but uses the VS Code native Toggle Line Comment and Toggle Block Comment features.

Usage examples:

  • gc - toggles line comment. For example gcc to toggle line comment for current line and gc2j to toggle line comments for the current line and the next two lines.
  • gC - toggles block comment. For example gCi) to comment out everything within parentheses.

vim-indent-object

Based on vim-indent-object, it allows for treating blocks of code at the current indentation level as text objects. Useful in languages that don't use braces around statements (e.g. Python).

Provided there is a new line between the opening and closing braces / tag, it can be considered an agnostic cib/ci{/ci[/cit.

CommandDescription
<operator>iiThis indentation level
<operator>aiThis indentation level and the line above (think if statements in Python)
<operator>aIThis indentation level, the line above, and the line after (think if statements in C/C++/Java/etc)

vim-sneak

Based on vim-sneak, it allows for jumping to any location specified by two characters.

SettingDescriptionTypeDefault Value
vim.sneakEnable/disable vim-sneakBooleanfalse
vim.sneakUseIgnorecaseAndSmartcaseRespect vim.ignorecase and vim.smartcase while sneakingBooleanfalse

Once sneak is active, initiate motions using the following commands. For operators sneak uses z instead of s because s is already taken by the surround plugin.

Motion CommandDescription
s<char><char>Move forward to the first occurrence of <char><char>
S<char><char>Move backward to the first occurrence of <char><char>
<operator>z<char><char>Perform <operator> forward to the first occurrence of <char><char>
<operator>Z<char><char>Perform <operator> backward to the first occurrence of <char><char>

CamelCaseMotion

Based on CamelCaseMotion, though not an exact emulation. This plugin provides an easier way to move through camelCase and snake_case words.

SettingDescriptionTypeDefault Value
vim.camelCaseMotion.enableEnable/disable CamelCaseMotionBooleanfalse

Once CamelCaseMotion is enabled, the following motions are available:

Motion CommandDescription
<leader>wMove forward to the start of the next camelCase or snake_case word segment
<leader>eMove forward to the next end of a camelCase or snake_case word segment
<leader>bMove back to the prior beginning of a camelCase or snake_case word segment
<operator>i<leader>wSelect/change/delete/etc. the current camelCase or snake_case word segment

By default, <leader> is mapped to \, so for example, d2i\w would delete the current and next camelCase word segment.

Input Method

Disable input method when exiting Insert Mode.

SettingDescription
vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.enableBoolean denoting whether autoSwitchInputMethod is on/off.
vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.defaultIMDefault input method.
vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.obtainIMCmdThe full path to command to retrieve the current input method key.
vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.switchIMCmdThe full path to command to switch input method, with {im} a placeholder for input method key.

Any third-party program can be used to switch input methods. The following will walkthrough the configuration using im-select.

Install im-select (see installation guide)

Find your default input method key

Mac:

Switch your input method to English, and run the following in your terminal: /<path-to-im-select-installation>/im-select to output your default input method. The table below lists the common English key layouts for MacOS.

KeyDescription
com.apple.keylayout.USU.S.
com.apple.keylayout.ABCABC
com.apple.keylayout.BritishBritish
com.apple.keylayout.IrishIrish
com.apple.keylayout.AustralianAustralian
com.apple.keylayout.DvorakDvorak
com.apple.keylayout.ColemakColemak

Windows:

Refer to the im-select guide on how to discover your input method key. Generally, if your keyboard layout is en_US the input method key is 1033 (the locale ID of en_US). You can also find your locale ID from this page, where the LCID Decimal column is the locale ID.

Configure vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.

MacOS:

Given the input method key of com.apple.keylayout.US and im-select located at /usr/local/bin. The configuration is:

Windows:

Given the input method key of 1033 (en_US) and im-select.exe located at D:/bin. The configuration is:

"vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.enable": true,
"vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.defaultIM": "1033",
"vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.obtainIMCmd": "D:\\bin\\im-select.exe",
"vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.switchIMCmd": "D:\\bin\\im-select.exe {im}"
"vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.enable": true,
"vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.defaultIM": "com.apple.keylayout.US",
"vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.obtainIMCmd": "/usr/local/bin/im-select",
"vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.switchIMCmd": "/usr/local/bin/im-select {im}"

The {im} argument above is a command-line option that will be passed to im-select denoting the input method to switch to. If using an alternative program to switch input methods, you should add a similar option to the configuration. For example, if the program's usage is my-program -s imKey to switch input method, the vim.autoSwitchInputMethod.switchIMCmd should be /path/to/my-program -s {im}.

ReplaceWithRegister

Based on ReplaceWithRegister, an easy way to replace existing text with the contents of a register.

SettingDescriptionTypeDefault Value
vim.replaceWithRegisterEnable/disable ReplaceWithRegisterBooleanfalse

Once active, type gr (say "go replace") followed by a motion to describe the text you want replaced by the contents of the register.

Motion CommandDescription
[count]["a]gr<motion>Replace the text described by the motion with the contents of the specified register
[count]["a]grrReplace the [count] lines or current line with the contents of the specified register
{Visual}["a]grReplace the selection with the contents of the specified register

vim-textobj-entire

Similar to vim-textobj-entire.

Adds two useful text-objects:

  • ae which represents the entire content of a buffer.
  • ie which represents the entire content of a buffer without the leading and trailing spaces.

Usage examples:

  • dae - delete the whole buffer content.
  • yie - will yank the buffer content except leading and trailing blank lines.
  • gUae - transform the whole buffer to uppercase.

vim-textobj-arguments

Similar to the argument text object in targets.vim. It is an easy way to deal with arguments inside functions in most programming languages.

Motion CommandDescription
<operator>iaThe argument excluding separators.
<operator>aaThe argument including separators.

Usage examples:

  • cia - change the argument under the cursor while preserving separators like comma ,.
  • daa - will delete the whole argument under the cursor and the separators if applicable.
SettingDescriptionTypeDefault Value
vim.argumentObjectOpeningDelimitersA list of opening delimitersString list["(", "["]
vim.argumentObjectClosingDelimitersA list of closing delimitersString list[")", "]"]
vim.argumentObjectSeparatorsA list of object separatorsString list[","]

🎩 VSCodeVim tricks!

VS Code has a lot of nifty tricks and we try to preserve some of them:

  • gd - jump to definition.
  • gq - on a visual selection reflow and wordwrap blocks of text, preserving commenting style. Great for formatting documentation comments.
  • gb - adds another cursor on the next word it finds which is the same as the word under the cursor.
  • af - visual mode command which selects increasingly large blocks of text. For example, if you had "blah (foo [bar 'ba|z'])" then it would select 'baz' first. If you pressed af again, it'd then select [bar 'baz'], and if you did it a third time it would select "(foo [bar 'baz'])".
  • gh - equivalent to hovering your mouse over wherever the cursor is. Handy for seeing types and error messages without reaching for the mouse!

📚 F.A.Q.

None of the native Visual Studio Code ctrl (e.g. ctrl+f, ctrl+v) commands work

Set the useCtrlKeys setting to false.

Moving j/k over folds opens up the folds

Try setting vim.foldfix to true. This is a hack; it works fine, but there are side effects (see issue#22276).

Key repeat doesn't work

Are you on a Mac? Did you go through our mac-setup instructions?

There are annoying intellisense/notifications/popups that I can't close with <esc>! Or I'm in a snippet and I want to close intellisense

Press shift+<esc> to close all of those boxes.

How can I use the commandline when in Zen mode or when the status bar is disabled?

This extension exposes a remappable command to show a VS Code style quick-pick version of the commandline, with more limited functionality. This can be remapped as follows in VS Code's keybindings.json settings file.

Or for Zen mode only:

{
  "key": "shift+;",
  "command": "vim.showQuickpickCmdLine",
  "when": "inZenMode && vim.mode != 'Insert'"
}
{
  "key": "shift+;",
  "command": "vim.showQuickpickCmdLine",
  "when": "editorTextFocus && vim.mode != 'Insert'"
}

How can I move the cursor by each display line with word wrapping?

If you have word wrap on and would like the cursor to enter each wrapped line when using j, k, ↓ or ↑, set the following in VS Code's keybindings.json settings file.

Caveats: This solution restores the default VS Code behavior for the j and k keys, so motions like 10j will not work. If you need these motions to work, other, less performant options exist.

{
  "key": "up",
  "command": "cursorUp",
  "when": "editorTextFocus && vim.active && !inDebugRepl && !suggestWidgetMultipleSuggestions && !suggestWidgetVisible"
},
{
  "key": "down",
  "command": "cursorDown",
  "when": "editorTextFocus && vim.active && !inDebugRepl && !suggestWidgetMultipleSuggestions && !suggestWidgetVisible"
},
{
  "key": "k",
  "command": "cursorUp",
  "when": "editorTextFocus && vim.active && !inDebugRepl && vim.mode == 'Normal' && !suggestWidgetMultipleSuggestions && !suggestWidgetVisible"
},
{
  "key": "j",
  "command": "cursorDown",
  "when": "editorTextFocus && vim.active && !inDebugRepl && vim.mode == 'Normal' && !suggestWidgetMultipleSuggestions && !suggestWidgetVisible"
}

I've swapped Escape and Caps Lock with setxkbmap and VSCodeVim isn't respecting the swap

This is a known issue in VS Code, as a workaround you can set "keyboard.dispatch": "keyCode" and restart VS Code.

❤️ Contributing

This project is maintained by a group of awesome people and contributions are extremely welcome :heart:. For a quick tutorial on how you can help, see our contributing guide.

Buy Us A Coffee

Special shoutouts to:

  • Thanks to @xconverge for making over 100 commits to the repo. If you're wondering why your least favorite bug packed up and left, it was probably him.
  • Thanks to @Metamist for implementing EasyMotion!
  • Thanks to @sectioneight for implementing text objects!
  • Special props to Kevin Coleman, who created our awesome logo!
  • Shoutout to @chillee aka Horace He for his contributions and hard work.

Download Details:

Author: VSCodeVim
Source Code: https://github.com/VSCodeVim/Vim
License: MIT license

#typescript #vim #vscode 

Tamale  Moses

Tamale Moses

1640196000

Vim Client for TabNine

Tabnine - AI Code Completion

tl;dr jump to installation section

Tabnine is an AI-powered code completion extension trusted by millions of developers around the world. Whether you’re just getting started as a developer or if you’ve been doing it for decades, Tabnine will help you code twice as fast with half the keystrokes – all in your favorite IDE.

The Right Tool for The Job

Whether you call it IntelliSense, intelliCode, autocomplete, AI-assisted code completion, AI-powered code completion, AI copilot, AI code snippets, code suggestion, code prediction, code hinting, or content assist, you probably already know that it can save you tons of time, easily cutting your keystrokes in half.

Powered by sophisticated machine learning models trained on billions of lines of trusted Open Source code from GitHub, Tabnine is the most advanced AI-powered code completion copilot available today. And like GitHub, it is an essential tool for professional developers.

With and without Tabnine Java

Tabnine works with all major programming languages including:

PythonJavascriptJava
extended JSReactPHP
TypescriptC HeaderBash
MLSwiftRuby
PerlRustSQL
VueF#Scala
JuliaTOMLShell
YMALC / C++/ C#HTML
LuaMarkdownHaskell
GoObjective CJSON
CSS / SCSSAngularKotlin

Our Vision

Knowing that most of the code generated today has been created before begs the question - what if developers didn’t need to remember it, search for it, and type it again?

Learning from the past, focusing on the future, that’s the bedrock Tabnine is built on. Our AI-powered code completion tool embodies that vision by harnessing the collective achievements of every qualified piece of open source code ever written and serving that knowledge to our users in the form of code completion suggestions. As we move forward, Tabnine’s AI will play a valuable role in shaping the entire software development lifecycle.

Tabnine’s AI studies mountains of publicly available open source code and combines that with knowledge of your specific project and preferences creating code suggestions customized just for you. That saves you tons of keystrokes, and tons of time, all while keeping you aligned with best practices, and avoiding frustrating typos.

Pick the Plan that Works Best for You!

Tabnine Basic Tabnine’s Basic AI-powered code completion model is a fantastic time-saving tool for any developer. The Basic plan has plenty of free daily code completion suggestions to get you started, with no cost, no credit card, and no commitment.

Tabnine Pro Supercharge your AI code completion suggestions with our advanced ML model, unlock unlimited code suggestions, customize your experience, and get priority support. Experience the power of Tabnine Pro today!

Installation

Tabnine plugs into the following completion engines:

  • YouCompleteMe
  • coc.nvim
  • completion-nvim
  • nvim-cmp
  • deoplete.nvim
  • ddc.vim
  • nvim-compe

Not using any of the above?

  • If your completion engine is not supported - file a feature request.
  • If you don't use any completion engine - it's recommended that you follow the YouCompleteMe installation instructions.

YouCompleteMe

Tabnine supports YouCompleteMe through a fork. Follow the instructions here: https://github.com/tabnine/YouCompleteMe#installation

coc.nvim

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/neoclide/coc-tabnine

completion-nvim

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/aca/completion-tabnine#install

nvim-cmp

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/tzachar/cmp-tabnine

deoplete.nvim

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/tbodt/deoplete-tabnine

ddc.vim

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/LumaKernel/ddc-tabnine

nvim-compe

A community plugin is available here: https://github.com/tzachar/compe-tabnine

Investing In Our Community

FREE Tabnine Student Plan We know that tuition, books, rent, and food can get crazy expensive, that’s why Tabnine helps support the community and the dev superstars of tomorrow with a 100% free Tabnine Student license with all our Pro perks renewable for as long as you are a student.

Join the Tabnine Student Program for free

FAQ

Got a question? We’ve got the answer - Check out our FAQ page

Tabnine Support

Having some trouble with installation? Something not working the way you hoped? Tabnine Support is always happy to help. Feel free to contact us anytime at support@tabnine.com

Privacy

Your privacy is paramount, that’s why Tabnine uses a dual model design. While the public GPT-2 model works its magic continuously scanning hundreds of millions of trusted open source parameters, a second separate model runs locally on your machine keeping your code 100% private.

In addition, the local model focuses on learning your personal and project coding preferences, constantly improving the quality and accuracy of your code suggestions. Always separate. Always secure. Always private.

Find out more about how we keep your code private here

Tabnine Hub

A quick click on Tabnine on your IDE status bar takes you directly to your Tabnine Hub where you can easily update and manage all your account options and customize your suggestion preferences.

Usage

Tabnine is a textual autocomplete extension. When you type a specific string in your editor, you will be shown the Tabnine completion dialog box with suggestions for completing the code you’ve begun typing.

Deep Completion

Deep Tabnine is trained on millions of files from GitHub. During training, Tabnine’s goal is to predict the next token given the tokens that came before. To achieve this goal, Tabnine learns complex behavior, such as type inference in dynamically typed languages.

Deep Tabnine can use subtle clues that are difficult for traditional tools to access. For example, the return type of app.get_user() is assumed to be an object with setter methods, while the return type of app.get_users() is assumed to be a list.

Deep Tabnine is based on GPT-2, which uses the Transformers Network Architecture. This architecture was first developed to solve problems in natural language processing. Although modeling code and modeling natural language might appear to be unrelated tasks, modeling code requires understanding English in some unexpected ways.

  • Tabnine Indexes your entire project and determines which files to ignore by reading your .gitignore
  • Tabnine cuts your number of keystrokes in half and eliminates unnecessary typos
  • Tabnine works right out of the box ensuring frictionless installation and configuration
  • Tabnine offers code completion suggestions in less than 10 milliseconds

Commuinities

Recommended by developers everywhere:

William Candillon Tweet Imed Boumalek Tweet ramnivas Tweet bob paskar Tweet Nick Radford Tweet Hugues BR Tweet JohnyTheCarrot Tweet Donald E Fredrick Tweet Joshua Kelly Tweet JDerek Braid Tweet

Note:


A note on licensing: this repo includes source code as well as packaged Tabnine binaries. The MIT license only applies to the source code, not the binaries. The binaries are covered by the Tabnine Terms of Use.


The Vim client for Tabnine is adapted from YouCompleteMe. This client is an incompatible fork of YouCompleteMe, so please do not contact the YCM maintainers regarding any problems with it. Instead, create an issue in this repository.

Author: codota
Source Code: https://github.com/codota/tabnine-vim
License: GPL-3.0 License

#vim 

Annie  Emard

Annie Emard

1652038500

ALE: Check Syntax in Vim Asynchronously and Fix Files

Asynchronous Lint Engine

ALE (Asynchronous Lint Engine) is a plugin providing linting (syntax checking and semantic errors) in NeoVim 0.2.0+ and Vim 8 while you edit your text files, and acts as a Vim Language Server Protocol client.

A linting example with the darkspectrum color scheme in GVim.

ALE makes use of NeoVim and Vim 8 job control functions and timers to run linters on the contents of text buffers and return errors as text is changed in Vim. This allows for displaying warnings and errors in files being edited in Vim before files have been saved back to a filesystem.

In other words, this plugin allows you to lint while you type.

ALE offers support for fixing code with command line tools in a non-blocking manner with the :ALEFix feature, supporting tools in many languages, like prettier, eslint, autopep8, and more.

ALE acts as a "language client" to support a variety of Language Server Protocol features, including:

  • Diagnostics (via Language Server Protocol linters)
  • Go To Definition (:ALEGoToDefinition)
  • Completion (Built in completion support, or with Deoplete)
  • Finding references (:ALEFindReferences)
  • Hover information (:ALEHover)
  • Symbol search (:ALESymbolSearch)

If you don't care about Language Server Protocol, ALE won't load any of the code for working with it unless needed. One of ALE's general missions is that you won't pay for the features that you don't use.

Help Wanted: If you would like to help maintain this plugin by managing the many issues and pull requests that are submitted, please send the author an email at dev@w0rp.com.

If you enjoy this plugin, feel free to contribute or check out the author's other content at w0rp.com.

1. Supported Languages and Tools

ALE supports a wide variety of languages and tools. See the full list in the Supported Languages and Tools page.

2. Usage

2.i Linting

Once this plugin is installed, while editing your files in supported languages and tools which have been correctly installed, this plugin will send the contents of your text buffers to a variety of programs for checking the syntax and semantics of your programs. By default, linters will be re-run in the background to check your syntax when you open new buffers or as you make edits to your files.

The behavior of linting can be configured with a variety of options, documented in the Vim help file. For more information on the options ALE offers, consult :help ale-options for global options and :help ale-integration-options for options specified to particular linters.

 

2.ii Fixing

ALE can fix files with the ALEFix command. Functions need to be configured either in each buffer with a b:ale_fixers, or globally with g:ale_fixers.

The recommended way to configure fixers is to define a List in an ftplugin file.

" In ~/.vim/ftplugin/javascript.vim, or somewhere similar.

" Fix files with prettier, and then ESLint.
let b:ale_fixers = ['prettier', 'eslint']
" Equivalent to the above.
let b:ale_fixers = {'javascript': ['prettier', 'eslint']}

You can also configure your fixers from vimrc using g:ale_fixers, before or after ALE has been loaded.

A * in place of the filetype will apply a List of fixers to all files which do not match some filetype in the Dictionary.

Note that using a plain List for g:ale_fixers is not supported.

" In ~/.vim/vimrc, or somewhere similar.
let g:ale_fixers = {
\   '*': ['remove_trailing_lines', 'trim_whitespace'],
\   'javascript': ['eslint'],
\}

If you want to automatically fix files when you save them, you need to turn a setting on in vimrc.

" Set this variable to 1 to fix files when you save them.
let g:ale_fix_on_save = 1

The :ALEFixSuggest command will suggest some supported tools for fixing code. Both g:ale_fixers and b:ale_fixers can also accept functions, including lambda functions, as fixers, for fixing files with custom tools.

See :help ale-fix for complete information on how to fix files with ALE.

 

2.iii Completion

ALE offers some support for completion via hijacking of omnicompletion while you type. All of ALE's completion information must come from Language Server Protocol linters, or from tsserver for TypeScript.

ALE integrates with Deoplete as a completion source, named 'ale'. You can configure Deoplete to only use ALE as the source of completion information, or mix it with other sources.

" Use ALE and also some plugin 'foobar' as completion sources for all code.
call deoplete#custom#option('sources', {
\ '_': ['ale', 'foobar'],
\})

ALE also offers its own automatic completion support, which does not require any other plugins, and can be enabled by changing a setting before ALE is loaded.

" Enable completion where available.
" This setting must be set before ALE is loaded.
"
" You should not turn this setting on if you wish to use ALE as a completion
" source for other completion plugins, like Deoplete.
let g:ale_completion_enabled = 1

ALE provides an omni-completion function you can use for triggering completion manually with <C-x><C-o>.

set omnifunc=ale#completion#OmniFunc

ALE supports automatic imports from external modules. This behavior is enabled by default and can be disabled by setting:

let g:ale_completion_autoimport = 0

Note that disabling auto import can result in missing completion items from some LSP servers (e.g. eclipselsp). See :help ale-completion for more information.

 

2.iv Go To Definition

ALE supports jumping to the definition of words under your cursor with the :ALEGoToDefinition command using any enabled Language Server Protocol linters and tsserver.

See :help ale-go-to-definition for more information.

 

2.v Find References

ALE supports finding references for words under your cursor with the :ALEFindReferences command using any enabled Language Server Protocol linters and tsserver.

See :help ale-find-references for more information.

 

2.vi Hovering

ALE supports "hover" information for printing brief information about symbols at the cursor taken from Language Server Protocol linters and tsserver with the ALEHover command.

Truncated information will be displayed when the cursor rests on a symbol by default, as long as there are no problems on the same line.

The information can be displayed in a balloon tooltip in Vim or GVim by hovering your mouse over symbols. Mouse hovering is enabled by default in GVim, and needs to be configured for Vim 8.1+ in terminals.

See :help ale-hover for more information.

 

2.vii Symbol Search

ALE supports searching for workspace symbols via Language Server Protocol linters with the ALESymbolSearch command.

Search queries can be performed to find functions, types, and more which are similar to a given query string.

See :help ale-symbol-search for more information.

 

2.viii Refactoring: Rename, Actions

ALE supports renaming symbols in symbols in code such as variables or class names with the ALERename command.

ALEFileRename will rename file and fix import paths (tsserver only).

ALECodeAction will execute actions on the cursor or applied to a visual range selection, such as automatically fixing errors.

See :help ale-refactor for more information.

 

3. Installation

To install this plugin, you should use one of the following methods. For Windows users, replace usage of the Unix ~/.vim directory with %USERPROFILE%\vimfiles, or another directory if you have configured Vim differently. On Windows, your ~/.vimrc file will be similarly stored in %USERPROFILE%\_vimrc.

 

3.i. Installation with Vim package management

In Vim 8 and NeoVim, you can install plugins easily without needing to use any other tools. Simply clone the plugin into your pack directory.

Vim 8 on Unix

mkdir -p ~/.vim/pack/git-plugins/start
git clone --depth 1 https://github.com/dense-analysis/ale.git ~/.vim/pack/git-plugins/start/ale

NeoVim on Unix

mkdir -p ~/.local/share/nvim/site/pack/git-plugins/start
git clone --depth 1 https://github.com/dense-analysis/ale.git ~/.local/share/nvim/site/pack/git-plugins/start/ale

Vim 8 on Windows

# Run these commands in the "Git for Windows" Bash terminal
mkdir -p ~/vimfiles/pack/git-plugins/start
git clone --depth 1 https://github.com/dense-analysis/ale.git ~/vimfiles/pack/git-plugins/start/ale

Generating Vim help files

You can add the following line to your vimrc files to generate documentation tags automatically, if you don't have something similar already, so you can use the :help command to consult ALE's online documentation:

" Put these lines at the very end of your vimrc file.

" Load all plugins now.
" Plugins need to be added to runtimepath before helptags can be generated.
packloadall
" Load all of the helptags now, after plugins have been loaded.
" All messages and errors will be ignored.
silent! helptags ALL

 

3.ii. Installation with Pathogen

To install this module with Pathogen, you should clone this repository to your bundle directory, and ensure you have the line execute pathogen#infect() in your ~/.vimrc file. You can run the following commands in your terminal to do so:

cd ~/.vim/bundle
git clone https://github.com/dense-analysis/ale.git

 

3.iii. Installation with Vundle

You can install this plugin using Vundle by adding the GitHub path for this repository to your ~/.vimrc:

Plugin 'dense-analysis/ale'

Then run the command :PluginInstall in Vim.

See the Vundle documentation for more information.

 

3.iiii. Installation with Vim-Plug

You can install this plugin using Vim-Plug by adding the GitHub path for this repository to your ~/.vimrc:

Plug 'dense-analysis/ale'

Then run the command :PlugInstall in Vim.

See the Vim-Plug documentation for more information.

 

4. Contributing

If you would like to see support for more languages and tools, please create an issue or create a pull request. If your tool can read from stdin or you have code to suggest which is good, support can be happily added for it.

If you are interested in the general direction of the project, check out the wiki home page. The wiki includes a Roadmap for the future, and more.

If you'd liked to discuss the project more directly, check out the #vim-ale channel on Libera Chat. Web chat is available here.

 

5. FAQ

 

5.i. How do I disable particular linters?

By default, all available tools for all supported languages will be run. If you want to only select a subset of the tools, you can define b:ale_linters for a single buffer, or g:ale_linters globally.

The recommended way to configure linters is to define a List in an ftplugin file.

" In ~/.vim/ftplugin/javascript.vim, or somewhere similar.

" Enable ESLint only for JavaScript.
let b:ale_linters = ['eslint']

" Equivalent to the above.
let b:ale_linters = {'javascript': ['eslint']}

You can also declare which linters you want to run in your vimrc file, before or after ALE has been loaded.

" In ~/.vim/vimrc, or somewhere similar.
let g:ale_linters = {
\   'javascript': ['eslint'],
\}

For all languages unspecified in the dictionary, all possible linters will be run for those languages, just as when the dictionary is not defined. Running many linters should not typically obstruct editing in Vim, as they will all be executed in separate processes simultaneously.

If you don't want ALE to run anything other than what you've explicitly asked for, you can set g:ale_linters_explicit to 1.

" Only run linters named in ale_linters settings.
let g:ale_linters_explicit = 1

This plugin will look for linters in the ale_linters directory. Each directory within corresponds to a particular filetype in Vim, and each file in each directory corresponds to the name of a particular linter.

 

5.ii. How can I see what ALE has configured for the current file?

Run the following to see what is currently configured:

:ALEInfo

 

5.iii. How can I use ALE and coc.nvim together?

coc.nvim is a popular Vim plugin written in TypeScript and dependent on the npm ecosystem for providing full IDE features to Vim. Both ALE and coc.nvim implement Language Server Protocol (LSP) clients for supporting diagnostics (linting with a live server), and other features like auto-completion, and others listed above.

ALE is primarily focused on integrating with external programs through virtually any means, provided the plugin remains almost entirely written in Vim script. coc.nvim is primarily focused on bringing IDE features to Vim. If you want to run external programs on your files to check for errors, and also use the most advanced IDE features, you might want to use both plugins at the same time.

The easiest way to get both plugins to work together is to configure coc.nvim to send diagnostics to ALE, so ALE controls how all problems are presented to you, and to disable all LSP features in ALE, so ALE doesn't try to provide LSP features already provided by coc.nvim, such as auto-completion.

  1. Open your coc.nvim configuration file with :CocConfig and add "diagnostic.displayByAle": true to your settings.
  2. Add let g:ale_disable_lsp = 1 to your vimrc file, before plugins are loaded.

You can also use b:ale_disable_lsp in your ftplugin files to enable or disable LSP features in ALE for different filetypes. After you configure coc.nvim and ALE this way, you can further configure how problems appear to you by using all of the settings mentioned in ALE's help file, including how often diagnostics are requested. See :help ale-lint.

The integration between ALE and coc.nvim works using an API ALE offers for letting any other plugin integrate with ALE. If you are interested in writing a similar integration, see :help ale-lint-other-sources.

 

5.iv. How can I keep the sign gutter open?

You can keep the sign gutter open at all times by setting the g:ale_sign_column_always to 1

let g:ale_sign_column_always = 1

 

5.v. How can I change the signs ALE uses?

Use these options to specify what text should be used for signs:

let g:ale_sign_error = '>>'
let g:ale_sign_warning = '--'

ALE sets some background colors automatically for warnings and errors in the sign gutter, with the names ALEErrorSign and ALEWarningSign. These colors can be customised, or even removed completely:

highlight clear ALEErrorSign
highlight clear ALEWarningSign

 

5.vi. How can I change or disable the highlights ALE uses?

ALE's highlights problems with highlight groups which link to SpellBad, SpellCap, error, and todo groups by default. The characters that are highlighted depend on the linters being used, and the information provided to ALE.

Highlighting can be disabled completely by setting g:ale_set_highlights to 0.

" Set this in your vimrc file to disabling highlighting
let g:ale_set_highlights = 0

You can control all of the highlights ALE uses, say if you are using a different color scheme which produces ugly highlights. For example:

highlight ALEWarning ctermbg=DarkMagenta

See :help ale-highlights for more information.

 

5.vii. How can I show errors or warnings in my statusline?

vim-airline integrates with ALE for displaying error information in the status bar. If you want to see the status for ALE in a nice format, it is recommended to use vim-airline with ALE. The airline extension can be enabled by adding the following to your vimrc:

" Set this. Airline will handle the rest.
let g:airline#extensions#ale#enabled = 1

If you don't want to use vim-airline, you can implement your own statusline function without adding any other plugins. ALE provides some functions to assist in this endeavour, including:

  • ale#statusline#Count: Which returns the number of problems found by ALE for a specified buffer.
  • ale#statusline#FirstProblem: Which returns a dictionary containing the full loclist details of the first problem of a specified type found by ALE in a buffer. (e.g. The first style warning in the current buffer.) This can be useful for displaying more detailed information such as the line number of the first problem in a file.

Say you want to display all errors as one figure, and all non-errors as another figure. You can do the following:

function! LinterStatus() abort
    let l:counts = ale#statusline#Count(bufnr(''))

    let l:all_errors = l:counts.error + l:counts.style_error
    let l:all_non_errors = l:counts.total - l:all_errors

    return l:counts.total == 0 ? 'OK' : printf(
    \   '%dW %dE',
    \   all_non_errors,
    \   all_errors
    \)
endfunction

set statusline=%{LinterStatus()}

See :help ale#statusline#Count() or :help ale#statusline#FirstProblem() for more information.

 

5.viii. How can I show errors or warnings in my lightline?

lightline does not have built-in support for ALE, nevertheless there is a plugin that adds this functionality: maximbaz/lightline-ale.

For more information, check out the sources of that plugin, :help ale#statusline#Count() and lightline documentation.

 

5.ix. How can I change the format for echo messages?

There are 3 global options that allow customizing the echoed message.

  • g:ale_echo_msg_format where:
    • %s is the error message itself
    • %...code...% is an optional error code, and most characters can be written between the % characters.
    • %linter% is the linter name
    • %severity% is the severity type
  • g:ale_echo_msg_error_str is the string used for error severity.
  • g:ale_echo_msg_warning_str is the string used for warning severity.

So for example this:

let g:ale_echo_msg_error_str = 'E'
let g:ale_echo_msg_warning_str = 'W'
let g:ale_echo_msg_format = '[%linter%] %s [%severity%]'

Will give you:

Echoed message

See :help g:ale_echo_msg_format for more information.

 

5.x. How can I execute some code when ALE starts or stops linting?

ALE runs its own autocmd events when a lint or fix cycle are started and stopped. There is also an event that runs when a linter job has been successfully started. These events can be used to call arbitrary functions during these respective parts of the ALE's operation.

augroup YourGroup
    autocmd!
    autocmd User ALELintPre    call YourFunction()
    autocmd User ALELintPost   call YourFunction()

    autocmd User ALEJobStarted call YourFunction()

    autocmd User ALEFixPre     call YourFunction()
    autocmd User ALEFixPost    call YourFunction()
augroup END

 

5.xi. How can I navigate between errors quickly?

ALE offers some commands with <Plug> keybinds for moving between warnings and errors quickly. You can map the keys Ctrl+j and Ctrl+k to moving between errors for example:

nmap <silent> <C-k> <Plug>(ale_previous_wrap)
nmap <silent> <C-j> <Plug>(ale_next_wrap)

For more information, consult the online documentation with :help ale-navigation-commands.

 

5.xii. How can I run linters only when I save files?

ALE offers an option g:ale_lint_on_save for enabling running the linters when files are saved. This option is enabled by default. If you only wish to run linters when files are saved, you can turn the other options off.

" Write this in your vimrc file
let g:ale_lint_on_text_changed = 'never'
let g:ale_lint_on_insert_leave = 0
" You can disable this option too
" if you don't want linters to run on opening a file
let g:ale_lint_on_enter = 0

If for whatever reason you don't wish to run linters again when you save files, you can set g:ale_lint_on_save to 0.

 

5.xiii. How can I use the quickfix list instead of the loclist?

The quickfix list can be enabled by turning the g:ale_set_quickfix option on. If you wish to also disable the loclist, you can disable the g:ale_set_loclist option.

" Write this in your vimrc file
let g:ale_set_loclist = 0
let g:ale_set_quickfix = 1

If you wish to show Vim windows for the loclist or quickfix items when a file contains warnings or errors, g:ale_open_list can be set to 1. g:ale_keep_list_window_open can be set to 1 if you wish to keep the window open even after errors disappear.

let g:ale_open_list = 1
" Set this if you want to.
" This can be useful if you are combining ALE with
" some other plugin which sets quickfix errors, etc.
let g:ale_keep_list_window_open = 1

You can also set let g:ale_list_vertical = 1 to open the windows vertically instead of the default horizontally.

 

5.xiv. How can I check JSX files with both stylelint and eslint?

If you configure ALE options correctly in your vimrc file, and install the right tools, you can check JSX files with stylelint and eslint.

First, install eslint and install stylelint with stylelint-processor-styled-components.

Supposing you have installed both tools correctly, configure your .jsx files so jsx is included in the filetype. You can use an autocmd for this.

augroup FiletypeGroup
    autocmd!
    au BufNewFile,BufRead *.jsx set filetype=javascript.jsx
augroup END

Supposing the filetype has been set correctly, you can set the following options in a jsx.vim ftplugin file.

" In ~/.vim/ftplugin/jsx.vim, or somewhere similar.
let b:ale_linter_aliases = ['css', 'javascript']
let b:ale_linters = ['stylelint', 'eslint']

Or if you want, you can configure the linters from your vimrc file.

" In ~/.vim/vimrc, or somewhere similar.
let g:ale_linter_aliases = {'jsx': ['css', 'javascript']}
let g:ale_linters = {'jsx': ['stylelint', 'eslint']}

ALE will alias the jsx filetype so it uses the css filetype linters, and use the original Array of selected linters for jsx from the g:ale_linters object. All available linters will be used for the filetype javascript, and no linter will be run twice for the same file.

 

5.xv. How can I check Vue files with ESLint?

To check Vue files with ESLint, your ESLint project configuration file must be configured to use the Vue plugin. After that, you need to configure ALE so it will run the JavaScript ESLint linter on your files. The settings you need are similar to the settings needed for checking JSX code with both stylelint and ESLint, in the previous section.

" In ~/.vim/ftplugin/vue.vim, or somewhere similar.

" Run both javascript and vue linters for vue files.
let b:ale_linter_aliases = ['javascript', 'vue']
" Select the eslint and vls linters.
let b:ale_linters = ['eslint', 'vls']

Run :ALEInfo to see which linters are available after telling ALE to run JavaScript linters on Vue files. Not all linters support checking Vue files.

If you don't want to configure your linters in ftplugin files for some reason, you can configure them from your vimrc file instead.

" In ~/.vim/vimrc, or somewhere similar.
let g:ale_linter_aliases = {'vue': ['vue', 'javascript']}
let g:ale_linters = {'vue': ['eslint', 'vls']}

 

5.xvi. Will this plugin eat all of my laptop battery power?

ALE takes advantage of the power of various tools to check your code. This of course means that CPU time will be used to continuously check your code. If you are concerned about the CPU time ALE will spend, which will of course imply some cost to battery life, you can adjust your settings to make your CPU do less work.

First, consider increasing the delay before which ALE will run any linters while you type. ALE uses a timeout which is cancelled and reset every time you type, and this delay can be increased so linters are run less often. See :help g:ale_lint_delay for more information.

If you don't wish to run linters while you type, you can disable that behavior. Set g:ale_lint_on_text_changed to never. You won't get as frequent error checking, but ALE shouldn't block your ability to edit a document after you save a file, so the asynchronous nature of the plugin will still be an advantage.

If you are still concerned, you can turn the automatic linting off altogether, including the option g:ale_lint_on_enter, and you can run ALE manually with :ALELint.

 

5.xvii. How can I configure my C or C++ project?

The structure of C and C++ projects varies wildly from project to project, with many different build tools being used for building them, and many different formats for project configuration files. ALE can run compilers easily, but ALE cannot easily detect which compiler flags to use.

Some tools and build configurations can generate compile_commands.json files. The cppcheck, clangcheck, clangtidy and cquery linters can read these files for automatically determining the appropriate compiler flags to use.

For linting with compilers like gcc and clang, and with other tools, you will need to tell ALE which compiler flags to use yourself. You can use different options for different projects with the g:ale_pattern_options setting. Consult the documentation for that setting for more information. b:ale_linters can be used to select which tools you want to run, say if you want to use only gcc for one project, and only clang for another.

ALE will attempt to parse compile_commands.json files to discover compiler flags to use when linting code. See :help g:ale_c_parse_compile_commands for more information. See Clang's documentation for compile_commands.json files. You should strongly consider generating them in your builds, which is easy to do with CMake.

You can also configure ALE to automatically run make -n to run dry runs on Makefiles to discover compiler flags. This can execute arbitrary code, so the option is disabled by default. See :help g:ale_c_parse_makefile.

You may also configure buffer-local settings for linters with project-specific vimrc files. local_vimrc can be used for executing local vimrc files which can be shared in your project.

 

5.xviii. How can I configure ALE differently for different buffers?

ALE offers various ways to configure which linters or fixers are run, and other settings. For the majority of ALE's settings, they can either be configured globally with a g: variable prefix, or for a specific buffer with a b: variable prefix. For example, you can configure a Python ftplugin file like so.

" In ~/.vim/ftplugin/python.vim

" Check Python files with flake8 and pylint.
let b:ale_linters = ['flake8', 'pylint']
" Fix Python files with autopep8 and yapf.
let b:ale_fixers = ['autopep8', 'yapf']
" Disable warnings about trailing whitespace for Python files.
let b:ale_warn_about_trailing_whitespace = 0

For configuring files based on regular expression patterns matched against the absolute path to a file, you can use g:ale_pattern_options.

" Do not lint or fix minified files.
let g:ale_pattern_options = {
\ '\.min\.js$': {'ale_linters': [], 'ale_fixers': []},
\ '\.min\.css$': {'ale_linters': [], 'ale_fixers': []},
\}
" If you configure g:ale_pattern_options outside of vimrc, you need this.
let g:ale_pattern_options_enabled = 1

Buffer-local variables for settings always override the global settings.

 

5.xix. How can I configure the height of the list in which ALE displays errors?

To set a default height for the error list, use the g:ale_list_window_size variable.

" Show 5 lines of errors (default: 10)
let g:ale_list_window_size = 5

 

5.xx. How can I run linters or fixers via Docker or a VM?

ALE supports running linters or fixers via Docker, virtual machines, or in combination with any remote machine with a different file system, so long as the tools are well-integrated with ALE, and ALE is properly configured to run the correct commands and map filename paths between different file systems. See :help ale-lint-other-machines for the full documentation on how to configure ALE to support this.

 

5.xxi. How can I change the borders for floating preview windows?

Borders for floating preview windows are enabled by default. You can use the g:ale_floating_window_border setting to configure them.

You could disable the border with an empty list.

let g:ale_floating_window_border = []

If the terminal supports Unicode, you might try setting the value like below, to make it look nicer.

let g:ale_floating_window_border = ['│', '─', '╭', '╮', '╯', '╰']

Since vim's default uses nice unicode characters when possible, you can trick ale into using that default with

let g:ale_floating_window_border = repeat([''], 6)

 

5.xxii. How can I use ALE and vim-lsp together?

vim-lsp is a popular plugin as implementation of Language Server Protocol (LSP) client for Vim. It provides all the LSP features including auto completion, diagnostics, go to definitions, etc.

ALE also provides LSP support for diagnostics. When you use both ALE and vim-lsp, one option is disabling ALE's LSP support by let g:ale_disable_lsp = 1. However ALE provides integration of external programs. Showing errors from language servers by vim-lsp and showing errors from other external programs by ALE are confusing and problematic.

vim-lsp-ale is a bridge plugin to solve the problem when using both ALE and vim-lsp. With the plugin, diagnostics are provided by vim-lsp and ALE can handle all the errors. Please read vim-lsp-ale's documentation for more details.

Author: dense-analysis
Source Code: https://github.com/dense-analysis/ale
License: BSD-2-Clause License

#vim