Louie Sanders

Louie Sanders

1611215100

Angular and legacy JavaScript integrations

Most systems that provide certain features that are commonly used, also provide some kind of integration. Let’s say that graphics and charts library, documented in old-plain legacy JavaScript (< ES5), with old styled HTML &<script> code, just to include a bar chart. Or some site that allows visitors buy event tickets, no API, no web components, just a block of code with a “insert this script on your code” which imports a Javascript file, a CSS file and embeds an iframe. You probably have seen this, and if you haven’t you’ll do sometime (trust me…)

This integrations, most of the times, are meant for non-developers, “include this code and it will work”, magic.

But, what if you have to make this integrations work with your Angular SPA?

#web-development #angular #legacy-code #javascript

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Angular and legacy JavaScript integrations
Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1593184320

Basics of Angular: Part-1

What is Angular? What it does? How we implement it in a project? So, here are some basics of angular to let you learn more about angular.

Angular is a Typescript-based open-source front-end web application platform. The Angular Team at Google and a community of individuals and corporations lead it. Angular lets you extend HTML’s syntax to express your apps’ components clearly. The angular resolves challenges while developing a single page and cross-platform applications. So, here the meaning of the single-page applications in angular is that the index.html file serves the app. And, the index.html file links other files to it.

We build angular applications with basic concepts which are NgModules. It provides a compilation context for components. At the beginning of an angular project, the command-line interface provides a built-in component which is the root component. But, NgModule can add a number of additional components. These can be created through a template or loaded from a router. This is what a compilation context about.

What is a Component in Angular?

Components are key features in Angular. It controls a patch of the screen called a view. A couple of components that we create on our own helps to build a whole application. In the end, the root component or the app component holds our entire application. The component has its business logic that it does to support the view inside the class. The class interacts with the view through an API of properties and methods. All the components added by us in the application are not linked to the index.html. But, they link to the app.component.html through the selectors. A component can be a component and not only a typescript class by adding a decorator @Component. Then, for further access, a class can import it. The decorator contains some metadata like selector, template, and style. Here’s an example of how a component decorator looks like:

@Component({
    selector: 'app-root',
    templateUrl: 'app.component.html',
    styleUrls: ['app.component.scss']
})

Role of App Module

Modules are the package of functionalities of our app. It gives Angular the information about which features does my app has and what feature it uses. It is an empty Typescript class, but we transform it by adding a decorator @NgModule. So, we have four properties that we set up on the object pass to @NgModule. The four properties are declarations, imports, providers, and bootstrap. All the built-in new components add up to the declarations array in @NgModule.

@NgModule({
declarations: [
  AppComponent,
],
imports: [
  BrowserModule,
  HttpClientModule,
  AppRoutingModule,
  FormsModule
],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})

What is Data Binding?

Data Binding is the communication between the Typescript code of the component and the template. So, we have different kinds of data binding given below:

  • When there is a requirement to output data from our Typescript code in the HTML template. String interpolation handles this purpose like {{data}} in HTML file. Property Binding is also used for this purpose like [property] = “data”.
  • When we want to trigger any event like clicking a button. Event Binding works while we react to user events like (event) = “expression”.
  • When we can react to user events and output something at the same time. Two-way Binding is used like [(ngModel)] = “data”.

image for understanding data binding

#angular #javascript #tech blogs #user interface (ui) #angular #angular fundamentals #angular tutorial #basics of angular

Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1598940617

Install Angular - Angular Environment Setup Process

Angular is a TypeScript based framework that works in synchronization with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. To work with angular, domain knowledge of these 3 is required.

  1. Installing Node.js and npm
  2. Installing Angular CLI
  3. Creating workspace
  4. Deploying your First App

In this article, you will get to know about the Angular Environment setup process. After reading this article, you will be able to install, setup, create, and launch your own application in Angular. So let’s start!!!

Angular environment setup

Install Angular in Easy Steps

For Installing Angular on your Machine, there are 2 prerequisites:

  • Node.js
  • npm Package Manager
Node.js

First you need to have Node.js installed as Angular require current, active LTS or maintenance LTS version of Node.js

Download and Install Node.js version suitable for your machine’s operating system.

Npm Package Manager

Angular, Angular CLI and Angular applications are dependent on npm packages. By installing Node.js, you have automatically installed the npm Package manager which will be the base for installing angular in your system. To check the presence of npm client and Angular version check of npm client, run this command:

  1. npm -v

Installing Angular CLI

  • Open Terminal/Command Prompt
  • To install Angular CLI, run the below command:
  1. npm install -g @angular/cli

installing angular CLI

· After executing the command, Angular CLI will get installed within some time. You can check it using the following command

  1. ng --version

Workspace Creation

Now as your Angular CLI is installed, you need to create a workspace to work upon your application. Methods for it are:

  • Using CLI
  • Using Visual Studio Code
1. Using CLI

To create a workspace:

  • Navigate to the desired directory where you want to create your workspace using cd command in the Terminal/Command prompt
  • Then in the directory write this command on your terminal and provide the name of the app which you want to create. In my case I have mentioned DataFlair:
  1. Ng new YourAppName

create angular workspace

  • After running this command, it will prompt you to select from various options about the CSS and other functionalities.

angular CSS options

  • To leave everything to default, simply press the Enter or the Return key.

angular setup

#angular tutorials #angular cli install #angular environment setup #angular version check #download angular #install angular #install angular cli

Louie Sanders

Louie Sanders

1611215100

Angular and legacy JavaScript integrations

Most systems that provide certain features that are commonly used, also provide some kind of integration. Let’s say that graphics and charts library, documented in old-plain legacy JavaScript (< ES5), with old styled HTML &<script> code, just to include a bar chart. Or some site that allows visitors buy event tickets, no API, no web components, just a block of code with a “insert this script on your code” which imports a Javascript file, a CSS file and embeds an iframe. You probably have seen this, and if you haven’t you’ll do sometime (trust me…)

This integrations, most of the times, are meant for non-developers, “include this code and it will work”, magic.

But, what if you have to make this integrations work with your Angular SPA?

#web-development #angular #legacy-code #javascript

Rahul Jangid

1622207074

What is JavaScript - Stackfindover - Blog

Who invented JavaScript, how it works, as we have given information about Programming language in our previous article ( What is PHP ), but today we will talk about what is JavaScript, why JavaScript is used The Answers to all such questions and much other information about JavaScript, you are going to get here today. Hope this information will work for you.

Who invented JavaScript?

JavaScript language was invented by Brendan Eich in 1995. JavaScript is inspired by Java Programming Language. The first name of JavaScript was Mocha which was named by Marc Andreessen, Marc Andreessen is the founder of Netscape and in the same year Mocha was renamed LiveScript, and later in December 1995, it was renamed JavaScript which is still in trend.

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is a client-side scripting language used with HTML (Hypertext Markup Language). JavaScript is an Interpreted / Oriented language called JS in programming language JavaScript code can be run on any normal web browser. To run the code of JavaScript, we have to enable JavaScript of Web Browser. But some web browsers already have JavaScript enabled.

Today almost all websites are using it as web technology, mind is that there is maximum scope in JavaScript in the coming time, so if you want to become a programmer, then you can be very beneficial to learn JavaScript.

JavaScript Hello World Program

In JavaScript, ‘document.write‘ is used to represent a string on a browser.

<script type="text/javascript">
	document.write("Hello World!");
</script>

How to comment JavaScript code?

  • For single line comment in JavaScript we have to use // (double slashes)
  • For multiple line comments we have to use / * – – * /
<script type="text/javascript">

//single line comment

/* document.write("Hello"); */

</script>

Advantages and Disadvantages of JavaScript

#javascript #javascript code #javascript hello world #what is javascript #who invented javascript

Marcelle  Smith

Marcelle Smith

1596284520

Creating Value From Legacy Data – the Whys and the Hows

How can we ‘reactivate’ the legacy systems, and in doing so, not only put indeed all the available data to use but also do something good for our climate?

While there are many challenges young companies might struggle with, they certainly escaped one that is a blessing and a curse at the same time – the legacy IT systems. Data is indeed one of the companies’ most valued assets, as knowledge (read, ‘data’) empowers better, more informed business decisions. Moreover, chances are your organization already has most of the knowledge it needs. The only caveat, though, is that it might be inaccessible and therefore, pretty useless.

In fact, according to various estimations, up to 97% of collected data is stored away and never gets to be used again, thus delivering zero value to the organization. Furthermore, a large portion of it comprises the so-called ‘dark data’ – data that is redundant, faulty, too old to hold any value at all, – or data that simply got forgotten.

And – here’s a surprising twist – this has an unpleasant effect on our climate. According to a recently published study by the American company Veritas Technologies, if we continue collecting and archiving all this ‘data waste’, we’ll end up with 5.8 million tons of CO2 being pumped into the atmosphere this year alone.

So, the main questions are, how can we ‘reactivate’ the legacy systems, and in doing so, not only put indeed all the available data to use but also do something good for our climate?

How Did We Get There?

Most organizations are fully aware of the fact that ‘oldie’ is sometimes not ‘goldie’. In today’s world, companies are increasingly relying on digital technologies to develop new products, increase operational efficiency, reduce costs, and – most importantly – ensure that customers have a satisfying experience.

So, how come that many companies still end up with sometimes decades-old systems that either run in parallel or are simply redundant, thereby driving up costs for maintenance and potentially, posing security risks and compliance issues?

Sometimes, a not entirely thought-through data migration strategy is the culprit. A company decides to replace one mission-critical piece of technology with a better one. To avoid disruption to the business operation, it lets both systems run in parallel “for a limited period” until data migration is over. Only to find out that not all data can be migrated as it is due to, for example, outdated and incompatible formats. Or the business logic of the legacy system wasn’t understood as well as it had been assumed, and the cumbersome source code is the only documentation the IT team has.

Another reason could be that the legacy system is – in the truest sense of the word – a legacy from a merger and acquisition. It’s a common issue when an acquired company brings into “the new relationship” outdated, inefficient, or redundant systems. Typically, both sides are aware of this and try to address the issue already during the pre-acquisition diligence process. However, often, this results in devising patches and workarounds that would merely help overcome the limitations of such systems. Consequently, instead of solving the issue efficiently and in the long term, companies often end up with incompatibilities among individual layers of the technology stack.

In the end, whether due to mergers and acquisitions, unforeseen issues during software replacement, or simply as a consequence of organic growth, the result is the same. Potentially valuable data – hence, knowledge – is locked away and inaccessible for use.

#integration #api integration #legacy #integration platform #legacy data #api