Aurelie  Block

Aurelie Block

1596232560

Protractor Tutorial: Handling Timeouts With Selenium

A lot of times while performing Selenium test automation, you’ll come across certain scenarios when your test fails because the webpage or the web element takes some time to load completely. In such scenarios, the best approach is to wait for the page or the web elements to load completely to avoid any errors due to timeout. These errors can be easily resolved if you know how to handle timeouts in Protractor with Selenium, as they help to set an interval of time before the next action is carried out.

To make it even simpler let’s say you visit Amazon’s website, you find a special deals button, you click on it and it brings out a popup with the offer, which further takes you to the deals page. These different elements like the button and pop-up take some time to load and become interactive. But when we run our test scripts without any instruction to wait, it’ll end up throwing an error. To deal with this, we need to handle timeouts in Protractor with Selenium so that we give ample amount of time for the particular element to load.

So, to help you tackle this problem, I’ll show you how to handle timeouts in this Protractor tutorial. If you’re new to Protractor you can visit this Protractor tutorial on running your first test script for Protractor testing.

Timeout While Waiting For The Page To Load

While performing Selenium test automation to navigate a page on the browser, you’ll instruct the Selenium WebDriver to load the web page using the browser.get() command. Under the hood, the Protractor framework waits for the page to load completely.

So let’s take a test case to handle timeouts in Selenium Protractor, where we set the timeout as 5000 ms or 5 secs, the browser will wait for the page to load until 5 sec and returns an error if the page takes more time to load.

For this, you’ll have to add getPageTimeout (timeout in milliseconds) to your protractor configuration file, to reflect the change in timeout globally. But in case you want to provide the timeout for individual test cases, you’ll have to pass an additional parameter when calling the browser.get() i.e. browser.get ( address, the timeout in milliseconds ).

#tutorial #performance #automation testing #selenium webdriver #selenium automation #javascript framework #protractor #javascript developers

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Protractor Tutorial: Handling Timeouts With Selenium
Selina  O'Hara

Selina O'Hara

1591717927

Protractor Tutorial: Handling Timeouts With Selenium

This brings us to the conclusion of this Protractor tutorial on how to handle timeout in Protractor Selenium. Throughout this article, I explored how to handle timeout and explored different approaches for it. After implementing this in our test scripts you’ll realize that it makes Selenium test automation scripts more effective. This helps to perform automated browser testing of websites that have multiple asynchronous tasks and might take some time to render on the browser windows.

Moreover, adding a timeout to our web page allows components on our web page to have enough time to load. This makes Protractor one of the best frameworks to test timeout for Selenium test automation. Also, since we know that protractor is based on selenium and used primarily for automated browser testing, it inherits many of its properties. Finally, there are many other functionalities of the framework available which I’ll discuss in the future Protractor tutorial.

I’d love to hear your opinion on this article in the comment section down below. Also, feel free to share this article with your friends on LinkedIn, Twitter, or any other social media platform. That’s all for now. Happy Testing!!!

#automation #selenium protractor #selenium tutorial #selenium

Aurelie  Block

Aurelie Block

1596232560

Protractor Tutorial: Handling Timeouts With Selenium

A lot of times while performing Selenium test automation, you’ll come across certain scenarios when your test fails because the webpage or the web element takes some time to load completely. In such scenarios, the best approach is to wait for the page or the web elements to load completely to avoid any errors due to timeout. These errors can be easily resolved if you know how to handle timeouts in Protractor with Selenium, as they help to set an interval of time before the next action is carried out.

To make it even simpler let’s say you visit Amazon’s website, you find a special deals button, you click on it and it brings out a popup with the offer, which further takes you to the deals page. These different elements like the button and pop-up take some time to load and become interactive. But when we run our test scripts without any instruction to wait, it’ll end up throwing an error. To deal with this, we need to handle timeouts in Protractor with Selenium so that we give ample amount of time for the particular element to load.

So, to help you tackle this problem, I’ll show you how to handle timeouts in this Protractor tutorial. If you’re new to Protractor you can visit this Protractor tutorial on running your first test script for Protractor testing.

Timeout While Waiting For The Page To Load

While performing Selenium test automation to navigate a page on the browser, you’ll instruct the Selenium WebDriver to load the web page using the browser.get() command. Under the hood, the Protractor framework waits for the page to load completely.

So let’s take a test case to handle timeouts in Selenium Protractor, where we set the timeout as 5000 ms or 5 secs, the browser will wait for the page to load until 5 sec and returns an error if the page takes more time to load.

For this, you’ll have to add getPageTimeout (timeout in milliseconds) to your protractor configuration file, to reflect the change in timeout globally. But in case you want to provide the timeout for individual test cases, you’ll have to pass an additional parameter when calling the browser.get() i.e. browser.get ( address, the timeout in milliseconds ).

#tutorial #performance #automation testing #selenium webdriver #selenium automation #javascript framework #protractor #javascript developers

Jeromy  Lowe

Jeromy Lowe

1592555371

Protractor Tutorial: Handling iFrames & Frames in Selenium

n this Protractor testing tutorial, I’ll take a look at how to handle frames and iframes in Selenium with Protractor. To learn more about Protractor, and how to perform Protractor testing, you can refer to this Protractor testing tutorial to perform cross browser testing.

#automation #selenium protractor #selenium tutorial #selenium

WebDriverIO Tutorial: Handling Alerts and Overlay In Selenium

You’d hardly find a website these days without alerts and pop-ups! The alert boxes warn you whenever you perform a wrong action or to enter details to access a website. These alert boxes stop you from performing any other browser functions till the alert is resolved. This is why it becomes important that you handle them in your Selenium test automation scripts.

In this WebDriverIO tutorial on alert handling in Selenium, I’ll show you how to handle alerts and pop-ups as well as overlay modal in WebDriverIO. I will also cover the different types of alerts you will face during automation and what are the key points you need to follow for alert handling in Selenium using WebDriverIO.

Types Of Alerts In WebDriverIO

Alerts and pop-ups are pretty common in any website development, and while performing Selenium test automation you have to handle them as well. These alerts or rather javascript alerts, are pop up that takes your attention away from the current browser and forces you to read them. You won’t be able to perform any further browser action if you don’t know how to handle the alerts, this stands true for both manual and automation.

It is important to note that you can’t identify alerts using devtools or by XPath. Also, since they can’t be handled as a window, this is why it gets a bit tricky to handle them, but don’t worry, you’d find more about this in the latter section of this WebDriverIo tutorial.

There are three types of alerts that you’d need to handle in WebDriverIO.

  1. Alert pop up
  2. Confirmation Alert
  3. Prompt pop up

Alert Pop Ups

The alert pop up or alert() method displays an alert box with just a message and ‘OK’ button. This alert used to inform the user about some information. There is only one button ‘OK’ displayed with the text of information. Here, the user has only one option to press the OK button. Below is the example of alert pop up.

JavaScript Alerts

Confirmation Alert

The confirmation alert is the second type of alert with a message, where it gives the user the option to press OK or Cancel. Here is the example of a confirmation alert.

Confirmation Alert

Prompt Pop-Up

The prompt pop up is the last alert where this used to let the user give input for the website. Here, the user can give input and press the OK button or press Cancel to avoid giving input. Below is the example of the prompt pop up.

Apart from these in-built javascript alerts, there is also one more pop up which is known as modal. The main difference between an alert and modal is that alert can not go off without requested actions e.g, OK, or Cancel. In the modal, it is made using the < div > tag by giving special CSS code. This modal can go off by clicking somewhere other than the modal.

Overlay Modal

This modal is built using the client-side framework e.g bootstrap, ReactJS. A developer can be used to display some information, pop up, and form. There is no special

Here is an example of Overlay Modal:

Modal title

Now, that you are familiar with a different kind of alert and modal available in javascript. I’ll show you more about alert handling in Selenium in this WebDriverIO tutorial.

#tutorial #performance #selenium #selenium automation #selenium automated testing #automation selenium #webdriver io

Ilene  Jerde

Ilene Jerde

1596801420

Selenium Tool Suite - Components and Features

Selenium is an automation testing tool; it is primarily used to test websites and web applications; it is an open-source tool. With the help of Selenium, test cases can run directly in web browsers, just like a person operating the web browsers. It supports many web browsers such as Opera, Safari, Chrome, Firefox, IE, etc. There are several different sub tools to support different automation test approaches. In this article, we will learn about selenium tool suite, its components and features. So let’s start!!!

#selenium tutorials #selenium grid #selenium ide #selenium rc #selenium tool suite #selenium webdriver