Makenzie  Rath

Makenzie Rath

1625871720

Take String form user and return the middle 3 Character of the given String

In this video, I am trying to explain about program Take String form user and return the middle 3 Character of the given String (in English). Please do watch the complete video for in-depth information.

Link to our [ Hindi ] Youtube Channel: https://bit.ly/2Lyw5f9

WsCubeTech – Digital Marketing Agency & Institute.
✔ We can help you to create a comprehensive Digital Marketing plan to take your business to new heights.
✔ Offering Job Oriented Most Latest, Updated and advanced Digital Marketing Courses with Practical, Hands-on Live Projects Training & Exposure. ( Both in English & Hindi)

For More information : Call us at : +91- 92696-98122 , 8561089567

Or visit at : https://www.wscubetech.com/

Please don’t Forget to Like, Share & Subscribe

►Subscribe: http://bit.ly/wscubechannel
► Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/wscubetech.india
► Twitter : https://twitter.com/wscube
► Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/wscubetechindia/
► LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/company/wscube-tech/
► Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/c/wscubetechjodhpur
► Website: http://wscubetech.com

------------------------------------------| Thanks |----------------------------
#PythonProgramming #Python

#pythonprogramming #python

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Take String form user and return the middle 3 Character of the given String
Veronica  Roob

Veronica Roob

1653475560

A Pure PHP Implementation Of The MessagePack Serialization Format

msgpack.php

A pure PHP implementation of the MessagePack serialization format.

Features

Installation

The recommended way to install the library is through Composer:

composer require rybakit/msgpack

Usage

Packing

To pack values you can either use an instance of a Packer:

$packer = new Packer();
$packed = $packer->pack($value);

or call a static method on the MessagePack class:

$packed = MessagePack::pack($value);

In the examples above, the method pack automatically packs a value depending on its type. However, not all PHP types can be uniquely translated to MessagePack types. For example, the MessagePack format defines map and array types, which are represented by a single array type in PHP. By default, the packer will pack a PHP array as a MessagePack array if it has sequential numeric keys, starting from 0 and as a MessagePack map otherwise:

$mpArr1 = $packer->pack([1, 2]);               // MP array [1, 2]
$mpArr2 = $packer->pack([0 => 1, 1 => 2]);     // MP array [1, 2]
$mpMap1 = $packer->pack([0 => 1, 2 => 3]);     // MP map {0: 1, 2: 3}
$mpMap2 = $packer->pack([1 => 2, 2 => 3]);     // MP map {1: 2, 2: 3}
$mpMap3 = $packer->pack(['a' => 1, 'b' => 2]); // MP map {a: 1, b: 2}

However, sometimes you need to pack a sequential array as a MessagePack map. To do this, use the packMap method:

$mpMap = $packer->packMap([1, 2]); // {0: 1, 1: 2}

Here is a list of type-specific packing methods:

$packer->packNil();           // MP nil
$packer->packBool(true);      // MP bool
$packer->packInt(42);         // MP int
$packer->packFloat(M_PI);     // MP float (32 or 64)
$packer->packFloat32(M_PI);   // MP float 32
$packer->packFloat64(M_PI);   // MP float 64
$packer->packStr('foo');      // MP str
$packer->packBin("\x80");     // MP bin
$packer->packArray([1, 2]);   // MP array
$packer->packMap(['a' => 1]); // MP map
$packer->packExt(1, "\xaa");  // MP ext

Check the "Custom types" section below on how to pack custom types.

Packing options

The Packer object supports a number of bitmask-based options for fine-tuning the packing process (defaults are in bold):

NameDescription
FORCE_STRForces PHP strings to be packed as MessagePack UTF-8 strings
FORCE_BINForces PHP strings to be packed as MessagePack binary data
DETECT_STR_BINDetects MessagePack str/bin type automatically
  
FORCE_ARRForces PHP arrays to be packed as MessagePack arrays
FORCE_MAPForces PHP arrays to be packed as MessagePack maps
DETECT_ARR_MAPDetects MessagePack array/map type automatically
  
FORCE_FLOAT32Forces PHP floats to be packed as 32-bits MessagePack floats
FORCE_FLOAT64Forces PHP floats to be packed as 64-bits MessagePack floats

The type detection mode (DETECT_STR_BIN/DETECT_ARR_MAP) adds some overhead which can be noticed when you pack large (16- and 32-bit) arrays or strings. However, if you know the value type in advance (for example, you only work with UTF-8 strings or/and associative arrays), you can eliminate this overhead by forcing the packer to use the appropriate type, which will save it from running the auto-detection routine. Another option is to explicitly specify the value type. The library provides 2 auxiliary classes for this, Map and Bin. Check the "Custom types" section below for details.

Examples:

// detect str/bin type and pack PHP 64-bit floats (doubles) to MP 32-bit floats
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::DETECT_STR_BIN | PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT32);

// these will throw MessagePack\Exception\InvalidOptionException
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::FORCE_STR | PackOptions::FORCE_BIN);
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT32 | PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT64);

Unpacking

To unpack data you can either use an instance of a BufferUnpacker:

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker();

$unpacker->reset($packed);
$value = $unpacker->unpack();

or call a static method on the MessagePack class:

$value = MessagePack::unpack($packed);

If the packed data is received in chunks (e.g. when reading from a stream), use the tryUnpack method, which attempts to unpack data and returns an array of unpacked messages (if any) instead of throwing an InsufficientDataException:

while ($chunk = ...) {
    $unpacker->append($chunk);
    if ($messages = $unpacker->tryUnpack()) {
        return $messages;
    }
}

If you want to unpack from a specific position in a buffer, use seek:

$unpacker->seek(42); // set position equal to 42 bytes
$unpacker->seek(-8); // set position to 8 bytes before the end of the buffer

To skip bytes from the current position, use skip:

$unpacker->skip(10); // set position to 10 bytes ahead of the current position

To get the number of remaining (unread) bytes in the buffer:

$unreadBytesCount = $unpacker->getRemainingCount();

To check whether the buffer has unread data:

$hasUnreadBytes = $unpacker->hasRemaining();

If needed, you can remove already read data from the buffer by calling:

$releasedBytesCount = $unpacker->release();

With the read method you can read raw (packed) data:

$packedData = $unpacker->read(2); // read 2 bytes

Besides the above methods BufferUnpacker provides type-specific unpacking methods, namely:

$unpacker->unpackNil();   // PHP null
$unpacker->unpackBool();  // PHP bool
$unpacker->unpackInt();   // PHP int
$unpacker->unpackFloat(); // PHP float
$unpacker->unpackStr();   // PHP UTF-8 string
$unpacker->unpackBin();   // PHP binary string
$unpacker->unpackArray(); // PHP sequential array
$unpacker->unpackMap();   // PHP associative array
$unpacker->unpackExt();   // PHP MessagePack\Type\Ext object

Unpacking options

The BufferUnpacker object supports a number of bitmask-based options for fine-tuning the unpacking process (defaults are in bold):

NameDescription
BIGINT_AS_STRConverts overflowed integers to strings [1]
BIGINT_AS_GMPConverts overflowed integers to GMP objects [2]
BIGINT_AS_DECConverts overflowed integers to Decimal\Decimal objects [3]

1. The binary MessagePack format has unsigned 64-bit as its largest integer data type, but PHP does not support such integers, which means that an overflow can occur during unpacking.

2. Make sure the GMP extension is enabled.

3. Make sure the Decimal extension is enabled.

Examples:

$packedUint64 = "\xcf"."\xff\xff\xff\xff"."\xff\xff\xff\xff";

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // string(20) "18446744073709551615"

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64, UnpackOptions::BIGINT_AS_GMP);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // object(GMP) {...}

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64, UnpackOptions::BIGINT_AS_DEC);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // object(Decimal\Decimal) {...}

Custom types

In addition to the basic types, the library provides functionality to serialize and deserialize arbitrary types. This can be done in several ways, depending on your use case. Let's take a look at them.

Type objects

If you need to serialize an instance of one of your classes into one of the basic MessagePack types, the best way to do this is to implement the CanBePacked interface in the class. A good example of such a class is the Map type class that comes with the library. This type is useful when you want to explicitly specify that a given PHP array should be packed as a MessagePack map without triggering an automatic type detection routine:

$packer = new Packer();

$packedMap = $packer->pack(new Map([1, 2, 3]));
$packedArray = $packer->pack([1, 2, 3]);

More type examples can be found in the src/Type directory.

Type transformers

As with type objects, type transformers are only responsible for serializing values. They should be used when you need to serialize a value that does not implement the CanBePacked interface. Examples of such values could be instances of built-in or third-party classes that you don't own, or non-objects such as resources.

A transformer class must implement the CanPack interface. To use a transformer, it must first be registered in the packer. Here is an example of how to serialize PHP streams into the MessagePack bin format type using one of the supplied transformers, StreamTransformer:

$packer = new Packer(null, [new StreamTransformer()]);

$packedBin = $packer->pack(fopen('/path/to/file', 'r+'));

More type transformer examples can be found in the src/TypeTransformer directory.

Extensions

In contrast to the cases described above, extensions are intended to handle extension types and are responsible for both serialization and deserialization of values (types).

An extension class must implement the Extension interface. To use an extension, it must first be registered in the packer and the unpacker.

The MessagePack specification divides extension types into two groups: predefined and application-specific. Currently, there is only one predefined type in the specification, Timestamp.

Timestamp

The Timestamp extension type is a predefined type. Support for this type in the library is done through the TimestampExtension class. This class is responsible for handling Timestamp objects, which represent the number of seconds and optional adjustment in nanoseconds:

$timestampExtension = new TimestampExtension();

$packer = new Packer();
$packer = $packer->extendWith($timestampExtension);

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker();
$unpacker = $unpacker->extendWith($timestampExtension);

$packedTimestamp = $packer->pack(Timestamp::now());
$timestamp = $unpacker->reset($packedTimestamp)->unpack();

$seconds = $timestamp->getSeconds();
$nanoseconds = $timestamp->getNanoseconds();

When using the MessagePack class, the Timestamp extension is already registered:

$packedTimestamp = MessagePack::pack(Timestamp::now());
$timestamp = MessagePack::unpack($packedTimestamp);

Application-specific extensions

In addition, the format can be extended with your own types. For example, to make the built-in PHP DateTime objects first-class citizens in your code, you can create a corresponding extension, as shown in the example. Please note, that custom extensions have to be registered with a unique extension ID (an integer from 0 to 127).

More extension examples can be found in the examples/MessagePack directory.

To learn more about how extension types can be useful, check out this article.

Exceptions

If an error occurs during packing/unpacking, a PackingFailedException or an UnpackingFailedException will be thrown, respectively. In addition, an InsufficientDataException can be thrown during unpacking.

An InvalidOptionException will be thrown in case an invalid option (or a combination of mutually exclusive options) is used.

Tests

Run tests as follows:

vendor/bin/phpunit

Also, if you already have Docker installed, you can run the tests in a docker container. First, create a container:

./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t msgpack -

The command above will create a container named msgpack with PHP 8.1 runtime. You may change the default runtime by defining the PHP_IMAGE environment variable:

PHP_IMAGE='php:8.0-cli' ./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t msgpack -

See a list of various images here.

Then run the unit tests:

docker run --rm -v $PWD:/msgpack -w /msgpack msgpack

Fuzzing

To ensure that the unpacking works correctly with malformed/semi-malformed data, you can use a testing technique called Fuzzing. The library ships with a help file (target) for PHP-Fuzzer and can be used as follows:

php-fuzzer fuzz tests/fuzz_buffer_unpacker.php

Performance

To check performance, run:

php -n -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

=============================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker
---------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0030 ........ 0.0139
false ................ 0.0037 ........ 0.0144
true ................. 0.0040 ........ 0.0137
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0052 ........ 0.0120
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0059 ........ 0.0114
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0061 ........ 0.0119
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0067 ........ 0.0126
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0064 ........ 0.0132
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0066 ........ 0.0135
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0078 ........ 0.0200
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0077 ........ 0.0212
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0203
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0111 ........ 0.0271
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0115 ........ 0.0260
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0103 ........ 0.0273
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0116 ........ 0.0326
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0118 ........ 0.0332
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0127 ........ 0.0325
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0140 ........ 0.0277
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0134 ........ 0.0294
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0134 ........ 0.0281
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0086 ........ 0.0241
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0089 ........ 0.0225
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0085 ........ 0.0229
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0280
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0121 ........ 0.0270
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0109 ........ 0.0274
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0128 ........ 0.0346
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0339
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0135 ........ 0.0368
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0138 ........ 0.0276
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0132 ........ 0.0286
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0137 ........ 0.0274
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0180 ........ 0.0285
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0134 ........ 0.0284
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0125 ........ 0.0275
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0283
fix string #1 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0133
fix string #2 ........ 0.0094 ........ 0.0216
fix string #3 ........ 0.0094 ........ 0.0222
fix string #4 ........ 0.0091 ........ 0.0241
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0122 ........ 0.0301
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0118 ........ 0.0304
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0119 ........ 0.0315
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0150 ........ 0.0388
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1545 ........ 0.1665
32-bit string ........ 0.1570 ........ 0.1756
wide char string #1 .. 0.0091 ........ 0.0236
wide char string #2 .. 0.0122 ........ 0.0313
8-bit binary #1 ...... 0.0100 ........ 0.0302
8-bit binary #2 ...... 0.0123 ........ 0.0324
8-bit binary #3 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0327
16-bit binary ........ 0.0168 ........ 0.0372
32-bit binary ........ 0.1588 ........ 0.1754
fix array #1 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0131
fix array #2 ......... 0.0294 ........ 0.0367
fix array #3 ......... 0.0412 ........ 0.0472
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.1378 ........ 0.1596
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S
complex array ........ 0.1865 ........ 0.2283
fix map #1 ........... 0.0725 ........ 0.1048
fix map #2 ........... 0.0319 ........ 0.0405
fix map #3 ........... 0.0356 ........ 0.0665
fix map #4 ........... 0.0465 ........ 0.0497
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.2540 ........ 0.3028
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.2372 ........ 0.2710
fixext 1 ............. 0.0283 ........ 0.0358
fixext 2 ............. 0.0291 ........ 0.0371
fixext 4 ............. 0.0302 ........ 0.0355
fixext 8 ............. 0.0288 ........ 0.0384
fixext 16 ............ 0.0293 ........ 0.0359
8-bit ext ............ 0.0302 ........ 0.0439
16-bit ext ........... 0.0334 ........ 0.0499
32-bit ext ........... 0.1845 ........ 0.1888
32-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0337 ........ 0.0547
32-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0335 ........ 0.0560
64-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0371 ........ 0.0575
64-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0374 ........ 0.0542
64-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0356 ........ 0.0533
96-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0362 ........ 0.0699
96-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0381 ........ 0.0701
96-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0367 ........ 0.0687
=============================================
Total                  2.7618          4.0820
Skipped                     4               4
Failed                      0               0
Ignored                     0               0

With JIT:

php -n -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.jit_buffer_size=64M -dopcache.jit=tracing -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

=============================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker
---------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0005 ........ 0.0054
false ................ 0.0004 ........ 0.0059
true ................. 0.0004 ........ 0.0059
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0047
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0046
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0025 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0023 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0024 ........ 0.0045
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0043 ........ 0.0081
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0043 ........ 0.0079
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0041 ........ 0.0080
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0095
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0091
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0094
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0085 ........ 0.0114
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0122
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0120
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0085 ........ 0.0159
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0086 ........ 0.0157
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0086 ........ 0.0158
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0080
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0080
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0081
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0095
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0090
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0056 ........ 0.0085
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0067 ........ 0.0107
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0066 ........ 0.0106
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0104
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0072 ........ 0.0162
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0073 ........ 0.0174
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0072 ........ 0.0164
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0077 ........ 0.0161
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0135
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0135
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0135
fix string #1 ....... -0.0002 ........ 0.0044
fix string #2 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0067
fix string #3 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0077
fix string #4 ........ 0.0033 ........ 0.0078
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0110
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0121
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0124
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0099 ........ 0.0146
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1522 ........ 0.1474
32-bit string ........ 0.1511 ........ 0.1483
wide char string #1 .. 0.0039 ........ 0.0084
wide char string #2 .. 0.0073 ........ 0.0123
8-bit binary #1 ...... 0.0040 ........ 0.0112
8-bit binary #2 ...... 0.0075 ........ 0.0123
8-bit binary #3 ...... 0.0077 ........ 0.0129
16-bit binary ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0145
32-bit binary ........ 0.1535 ........ 0.1479
fix array #1 ......... 0.0008 ........ 0.0061
fix array #2 ......... 0.0121 ........ 0.0165
fix array #3 ......... 0.0193 ........ 0.0222
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.0607 ........ 0.0479
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S
complex array ........ 0.0749 ........ 0.0824
fix map #1 ........... 0.0329 ........ 0.0431
fix map #2 ........... 0.0161 ........ 0.0189
fix map #3 ........... 0.0205 ........ 0.0262
fix map #4 ........... 0.0252 ........ 0.0205
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.1016 ........ 0.0927
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.1096 ........ 0.1030
fixext 1 ............. 0.0157 ........ 0.0161
fixext 2 ............. 0.0175 ........ 0.0183
fixext 4 ............. 0.0156 ........ 0.0185
fixext 8 ............. 0.0163 ........ 0.0184
fixext 16 ............ 0.0164 ........ 0.0182
8-bit ext ............ 0.0158 ........ 0.0207
16-bit ext ........... 0.0203 ........ 0.0219
32-bit ext ........... 0.1614 ........ 0.1539
32-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0195 ........ 0.0249
32-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0188 ........ 0.0260
64-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0207 ........ 0.0281
64-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0212 ........ 0.0291
64-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0207 ........ 0.0295
96-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0222 ........ 0.0358
96-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0228 ........ 0.0353
96-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0210 ........ 0.0319
=============================================
Total                  1.6432          1.9674
Skipped                     4               4
Failed                      0               0
Ignored                     0               0

You may change default benchmark settings by defining the following environment variables:

NameDefault
MP_BENCH_TARGETSpure_p,pure_u, see a list of available targets
MP_BENCH_ITERATIONS100_000
MP_BENCH_DURATIONnot set
MP_BENCH_ROUNDS3
MP_BENCH_TESTS-@slow, see a list of available tests

For example:

export MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p
export MP_BENCH_ITERATIONS=1000000
export MP_BENCH_ROUNDS=5
# a comma separated list of test names
export MP_BENCH_TESTS='complex array, complex map'
# or a group name
# export MP_BENCH_TESTS='-@slow' // @pecl_comp
# or a regexp
# export MP_BENCH_TESTS='/complex (array|map)/'

Another example, benchmarking both the library and the PECL extension:

MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p,pure_u,pecl_p,pecl_u \
php -n -dextension=msgpack.so -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

===========================================================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker  msgpack_pack  msgpack_unpack
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0031 ........ 0.0141 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0064
false ................ 0.0039 ........ 0.0154 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0053
true ................. 0.0038 ........ 0.0139 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0044
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0061 ........ 0.0110 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0046
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0119 ...... 0.0042 ........ 0.0029
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0054 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0045 ........ 0.0025
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0047 ........ 0.0103 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0022
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0022
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0046 ........ 0.0102 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0023
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0174 ...... 0.0039 ........ 0.0031
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0167 ...... 0.0040 ........ 0.0029
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0168 ...... 0.0039 ........ 0.0030
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0092 ........ 0.0222 ...... 0.0049 ........ 0.0030
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0096 ........ 0.0227 ...... 0.0042 ........ 0.0046
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0123 ........ 0.0274 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0051
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0136 ........ 0.0331 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0048
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0130 ........ 0.0336 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0048
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0127 ........ 0.0329 ...... 0.0051 ........ 0.0048
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0126 ........ 0.0268 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0049
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0135 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0046
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0131 ........ 0.0274 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0077 ........ 0.0236 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0087 ........ 0.0244 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0048
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0084 ........ 0.0241 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0049
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0112 ........ 0.0271 ...... 0.0048 ........ 0.0045
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0124 ........ 0.0292 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0049
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0270 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0050
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0137 ........ 0.0366 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0051
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0133 ........ 0.0366 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0049
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0129 ........ 0.0350 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0048
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0145 ........ 0.0254 ...... 0.0034 ........ 0.0025
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0097 ........ 0.0214 ...... 0.0034 ........ 0.0025
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0287 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0050
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0143 ........ 0.0277 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0046
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0134 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0052
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0141 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0050
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0144 ........ 0.0282 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0050
fix string #1 ........ 0.0036 ........ 0.0143 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0053
fix string #2 ........ 0.0107 ........ 0.0222 ...... 0.0065 ........ 0.0068
fix string #3 ........ 0.0116 ........ 0.0245 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0069
fix string #4 ........ 0.0105 ........ 0.0253 ...... 0.0083 ........ 0.0077
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0318 ...... 0.0075 ........ 0.0088
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0121 ........ 0.0295 ...... 0.0076 ........ 0.0086
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0125 ........ 0.0293 ...... 0.0130 ........ 0.0093
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0159 ........ 0.0368 ...... 0.0117 ........ 0.0086
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1547 ........ 0.1686 ...... 0.1516 ........ 0.1373
32-bit string ........ 0.1558 ........ 0.1729 ...... 0.1511 ........ 0.1396
wide char string #1 .. 0.0098 ........ 0.0237 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0065
wide char string #2 .. 0.0128 ........ 0.0291 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0082
8-bit binary #1 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #2 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #3 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
16-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
32-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix array #1 ......... 0.0040 ........ 0.0129 ...... 0.0120 ........ 0.0058
fix array #2 ......... 0.0279 ........ 0.0390 ...... 0.0143 ........ 0.0165
fix array #3 ......... 0.0415 ........ 0.0463 ...... 0.0162 ........ 0.0187
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.1349 ........ 0.1628 ...... 0.0334 ........ 0.0341
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex array ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fix map #1 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #2 ........... 0.0345 ........ 0.0391 ...... 0.0143 ........ 0.0168
fix map #3 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #4 ........... 0.0459 ........ 0.0473 ...... 0.0151 ........ 0.0163
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.2518 ........ 0.2962 ...... 0.0400 ........ 0.0490
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.2380 ........ 0.2682 ...... 0.0545 ........ 0.0579
fixext 1 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 2 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 4 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 8 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 16 ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
8-bit ext ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
16-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
===========================================================================
Total                  1.5625          2.3866        0.7735          0.7243
Skipped                     4               4             4               4
Failed                      0               0            24              17
Ignored                    24              24             0               7

With JIT:

MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p,pure_u,pecl_p,pecl_u \
php -n -dextension=msgpack.so -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.jit_buffer_size=64M -dopcache.jit=tracing -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

===========================================================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker  msgpack_pack  msgpack_unpack
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0001 ........ 0.0052 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0042
false ................ 0.0007 ........ 0.0060 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0043
true ................. 0.0008 ........ 0.0060 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0031 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0021 ........ 0.0043 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0022 ........ 0.0044 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0030 ........ 0.0048 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0032 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0031 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0054 ........ 0.0079 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0050
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0051 ........ 0.0079 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0044
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0051 ........ 0.0082 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0065 ........ 0.0045
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0045
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0095 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0047
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0088 ........ 0.0119 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0043
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0089 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0039
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0089 ........ 0.0118 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0044
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0097 ........ 0.0155 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0045
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0095 ........ 0.0153 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0045
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0096 ........ 0.0156 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0047
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0053 ........ 0.0083 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0052 ........ 0.0080 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0052 ........ 0.0080 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0043
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0089 ........ 0.0097 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0046
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0075 ........ 0.0093 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0043
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0075 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0046
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0122 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0044
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0087 ........ 0.0120 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0046
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0121 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0044
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0149 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0045
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0157 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0160 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0046
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0097 ........ 0.0157 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0044
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0153 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0044
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0152 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0045
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0155 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0044
fix string #1 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0045 ...... 0.0071 ........ 0.0044
fix string #2 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0075 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0060
fix string #3 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0086 ...... 0.0068 ........ 0.0060
fix string #4 ........ 0.0050 ........ 0.0088 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0059
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0081 ........ 0.0129 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0062
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0086 ........ 0.0128 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0065
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0086 ........ 0.0126 ...... 0.0115 ........ 0.0065
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0105 ........ 0.0137 ...... 0.0128 ........ 0.0068
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1510 ........ 0.1486 ...... 0.1526 ........ 0.1391
32-bit string ........ 0.1517 ........ 0.1475 ...... 0.1504 ........ 0.1370
wide char string #1 .. 0.0044 ........ 0.0085 ...... 0.0067 ........ 0.0057
wide char string #2 .. 0.0081 ........ 0.0125 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0063
8-bit binary #1 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #2 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #3 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
16-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
32-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix array #1 ......... 0.0014 ........ 0.0059 ...... 0.0132 ........ 0.0055
fix array #2 ......... 0.0146 ........ 0.0156 ...... 0.0155 ........ 0.0148
fix array #3 ......... 0.0211 ........ 0.0229 ...... 0.0179 ........ 0.0180
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.0673 ........ 0.0498 ...... 0.0343 ........ 0.0388
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex array ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fix map #1 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #2 ........... 0.0148 ........ 0.0180 ...... 0.0156 ........ 0.0179
fix map #3 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #4 ........... 0.0252 ........ 0.0201 ...... 0.0214 ........ 0.0167
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.1027 ........ 0.0836 ...... 0.0388 ........ 0.0510
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.1104 ........ 0.1010 ...... 0.0556 ........ 0.0602
fixext 1 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 2 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 4 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 8 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 16 ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
8-bit ext ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
16-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
===========================================================================
Total                  0.9642          1.0909        0.8224          0.7213
Skipped                     4               4             4               4
Failed                      0               0            24              17
Ignored                    24              24             0               7

Note that the msgpack extension (v2.1.2) doesn't support ext, bin and UTF-8 str types.

License

The library is released under the MIT License. See the bundled LICENSE file for details.

Author: rybakit
Source Code: https://github.com/rybakit/msgpack.php
License: MIT License

#php 

Edward Jackson

Edward Jackson

1653377002

PySpark Cheat Sheet: Spark in Python

This PySpark cheat sheet with code samples covers the basics like initializing Spark in Python, loading data, sorting, and repartitioning.

Apache Spark is generally known as a fast, general and open-source engine for big data processing, with built-in modules for streaming, SQL, machine learning and graph processing. It allows you to speed analytic applications up to 100 times faster compared to technologies on the market today. You can interface Spark with Python through "PySpark". This is the Spark Python API exposes the Spark programming model to Python. 

Even though working with Spark will remind you in many ways of working with Pandas DataFrames, you'll also see that it can be tough getting familiar with all the functions that you can use to query, transform, inspect, ... your data. What's more, if you've never worked with any other programming language or if you're new to the field, it might be hard to distinguish between RDD operations.

Let's face it, map() and flatMap() are different enough, but it might still come as a challenge to decide which one you really need when you're faced with them in your analysis. Or what about other functions, like reduce() and reduceByKey()

PySpark cheat sheet

Even though the documentation is very elaborate, it never hurts to have a cheat sheet by your side, especially when you're just getting into it.

This PySpark cheat sheet covers the basics, from initializing Spark and loading your data, to retrieving RDD information, sorting, filtering and sampling your data. But that's not all. You'll also see that topics such as repartitioning, iterating, merging, saving your data and stopping the SparkContext are included in the cheat sheet. 

Note that the examples in the document take small data sets to illustrate the effect of specific functions on your data. In real life data analysis, you'll be using Spark to analyze big data.

PySpark is the Spark Python API that exposes the Spark programming model to Python.

Initializing Spark 

SparkContext 

>>> from pyspark import SparkContext
>>> sc = SparkContext(master = 'local[2]')

Inspect SparkContext 

>>> sc.version #Retrieve SparkContext version
>>> sc.pythonVer #Retrieve Python version
>>> sc.master #Master URL to connect to
>>> str(sc.sparkHome) #Path where Spark is installed on worker nodes
>>> str(sc.sparkUser()) #Retrieve name of the Spark User running SparkContext
>>> sc.appName #Return application name
>>> sc.applicationld #Retrieve application ID
>>> sc.defaultParallelism #Return default level of parallelism
>>> sc.defaultMinPartitions #Default minimum number of partitions for RDDs

Configuration 

>>> from pyspark import SparkConf, SparkContext
>>> conf = (SparkConf()
     .setMaster("local")
     .setAppName("My app")
     . set   ("spark. executor.memory",   "lg"))
>>> sc = SparkContext(conf = conf)

Using the Shell 

In the PySpark shell, a special interpreter-aware SparkContext is already created in the variable called sc.

$ ./bin/spark-shell --master local[2]
$ ./bin/pyspark --master local[s] --py-files code.py

Set which master the context connects to with the --master argument, and add Python .zip..egg or.py files to the

runtime path by passing a comma-separated list to  --py-files.

Loading Data 

Parallelized Collections 

>>> rdd = sc.parallelize([('a',7),('a',2),('b',2)])
>>> rdd2 = sc.parallelize([('a',2),('d',1),('b',1)])
>>> rdd3 = sc.parallelize(range(100))
>>> rdd = sc.parallelize([("a",["x","y","z"]),
               ("b" ["p","r,"])])

External Data 

Read either one text file from HDFS, a local file system or any Hadoop-supported file system URI with textFile(), or read in a directory of text files with wholeTextFiles(). 

>>> textFile = sc.textFile("/my/directory/•.txt")
>>> textFile2 = sc.wholeTextFiles("/my/directory/")

Retrieving RDD Information 

Basic Information 

>>> rdd.getNumPartitions() #List the number of partitions
>>> rdd.count() #Count RDD instances 3
>>> rdd.countByKey() #Count RDD instances by key
defaultdict(<type 'int'>,{'a':2,'b':1})
>>> rdd.countByValue() #Count RDD instances by value
defaultdict(<type 'int'>,{('b',2):1,('a',2):1,('a',7):1})
>>> rdd.collectAsMap() #Return (key,value) pairs as a dictionary
   {'a': 2, 'b': 2}
>>> rdd3.sum() #Sum of RDD elements 4950
>>> sc.parallelize([]).isEmpty() #Check whether RDD is empty
True

Summary 

>>> rdd3.max() #Maximum value of RDD elements 
99
>>> rdd3.min() #Minimum value of RDD elements
0
>>> rdd3.mean() #Mean value of RDD elements 
49.5
>>> rdd3.stdev() #Standard deviation of RDD elements 
28.866070047722118
>>> rdd3.variance() #Compute variance of RDD elements 
833.25
>>> rdd3.histogram(3) #Compute histogram by bins
([0,33,66,99],[33,33,34])
>>> rdd3.stats() #Summary statistics (count, mean, stdev, max & min)

Applying Functions 

#Apply a function to each RFD element
>>> rdd.map(lambda x: x+(x[1],x[0])).collect()
[('a' ,7,7, 'a'),('a' ,2,2, 'a'), ('b' ,2,2, 'b')]
#Apply a function to each RDD element and flatten the result
>>> rdd5 = rdd.flatMap(lambda x: x+(x[1],x[0]))
>>> rdd5.collect()
['a',7 , 7 ,  'a' , 'a' , 2,  2,  'a', 'b', 2 , 2, 'b']
#Apply a flatMap function to each (key,value) pair of rdd4 without changing the keys
>>> rdds.flatMapValues(lambda x: x).collect()
[('a', 'x'), ('a', 'y'), ('a', 'z'),('b', 'p'),('b', 'r')]

Selecting Data

Getting

>>> rdd.collect() #Return a list with all RDD elements 
[('a', 7), ('a', 2), ('b', 2)]
>>> rdd.take(2) #Take first 2 RDD elements 
[('a', 7),  ('a', 2)]
>>> rdd.first() #Take first RDD element
('a', 7)
>>> rdd.top(2) #Take top 2 RDD elements 
[('b', 2), ('a', 7)]

Sampling

>>> rdd3.sample(False, 0.15, 81).collect() #Return sampled subset of rdd3
     [3,4,27,31,40,41,42,43,60,76,79,80,86,97]

Filtering

>>> rdd.filter(lambda x: "a" in x).collect() #Filter the RDD
[('a',7),('a',2)]
>>> rdd5.distinct().collect() #Return distinct RDD values
['a' ,2, 'b',7]
>>> rdd.keys().collect() #Return (key,value) RDD's keys
['a',  'a',  'b']

Iterating 

>>> def g (x): print(x)
>>> rdd.foreach(g) #Apply a function to all RDD elements
('a', 7)
('b', 2)
('a', 2)

Reshaping Data 

Reducing

>>> rdd.reduceByKey(lambda x,y : x+y).collect() #Merge the rdd values for each key
[('a',9),('b',2)]
>>> rdd.reduce(lambda a, b: a+ b) #Merge the rdd values
('a', 7, 'a' , 2 , 'b' , 2)

 

Grouping by

>>> rdd3.groupBy(lambda x: x % 2) #Return RDD of grouped values
          .mapValues(list)
          .collect()
>>> rdd.groupByKey() #Group rdd by key
          .mapValues(list)
          .collect() 
[('a',[7,2]),('b',[2])]

Aggregating

>> seqOp = (lambda x,y: (x[0]+y,x[1]+1))
>>> combOp = (lambda x,y:(x[0]+y[0],x[1]+y[1]))
#Aggregate RDD elements of each partition and then the results
>>> rdd3.aggregate((0,0),seqOp,combOp) 
(4950,100)
#Aggregate values of each RDD key
>>> rdd.aggregateByKey((0,0),seqop,combop).collect() 
     [('a',(9,2)), ('b',(2,1))]
#Aggregate the elements of each partition, and then the results
>>> rdd3.fold(0,add)
     4950
#Merge the values for each key
>>> rdd.foldByKey(0, add).collect()
[('a' ,9), ('b' ,2)]
#Create tuples of RDD elements by applying a function
>>> rdd3.keyBy(lambda x: x+x).collect()

Mathematical Operations 

>>>> rdd.subtract(rdd2).collect() #Return each rdd value not contained in rdd2
[('b' ,2), ('a' ,7)]
#Return each (key,value) pair of rdd2 with no matching key in rdd
>>> rdd2.subtractByKey(rdd).collect()
[('d', 1)1
>>>rdd.cartesian(rdd2).collect() #Return the Cartesian product of rdd and rdd2

Sort 

>>> rdd2.sortBy(lambda x: x[1]).collect() #Sort RDD by given function
[('d',1),('b',1),('a',2)]
>>> rdd2.sortByKey().collect() #Sort (key, value) ROD by key
[('a' ,2), ('b' ,1), ('d' ,1)]

Repartitioning 

>>> rdd.repartition(4) #New RDD with 4 partitions
>>> rdd.coalesce(1) #Decrease the number of partitions in the RDD to 1

Saving 

>>> rdd.saveAsTextFile("rdd.txt")
>>> rdd.saveAsHadoopFile("hdfs:// namenodehost/parent/child",
               'org.apache.hadoop.mapred.TextOutputFormat')

Stopping SparkContext 

>>> sc.stop()

Execution 

$ ./bin/spark-submit examples/src/main/python/pi.py

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#pyspark #cheatsheet #spark #python

Callum Slater

Callum Slater

1653465344

PySpark Cheat Sheet: Spark DataFrames in Python

This PySpark SQL cheat sheet is your handy companion to Apache Spark DataFrames in Python and includes code samples.

You'll probably already know about Apache Spark, the fast, general and open-source engine for big data processing; It has built-in modules for streaming, SQL, machine learning and graph processing. Spark allows you to speed analytic applications up to 100 times faster compared to other technologies on the market today. Interfacing Spark with Python is easy with PySpark: this Spark Python API exposes the Spark programming model to Python. 

Now, it's time to tackle the Spark SQL module, which is meant for structured data processing, and the DataFrame API, which is not only available in Python, but also in Scala, Java, and R.

Without further ado, here's the cheat sheet:

PySpark SQL cheat sheet

This PySpark SQL cheat sheet covers the basics of working with the Apache Spark DataFrames in Python: from initializing the SparkSession to creating DataFrames, inspecting the data, handling duplicate values, querying, adding, updating or removing columns, grouping, filtering or sorting data. You'll also see that this cheat sheet also on how to run SQL Queries programmatically, how to save your data to parquet and JSON files, and how to stop your SparkSession.

Spark SGlL is Apache Spark's module for working with structured data.

Initializing SparkSession 
 

A SparkSession can be used create DataFrame, register DataFrame as tables, execute SGL over tables, cache tables, and read parquet files.

>>> from pyspark.sql import SparkSession
>>> spark a SparkSession \
     .builder\
     .appName("Python Spark SQL basic example") \
     .config("spark.some.config.option", "some-value") \
     .getOrCreate()

Creating DataFrames
 

Fromm RDDs

>>> from pyspark.sql.types import*

Infer Schema

>>> sc = spark.sparkContext
>>> lines = sc.textFile(''people.txt'')
>>> parts = lines.map(lambda l: l.split(","))
>>> people = parts.map(lambda p: Row(nameap[0],ageaint(p[l])))
>>> peopledf = spark.createDataFrame(people)

Specify Schema

>>> people = parts.map(lambda p: Row(name=p[0],
               age=int(p[1].strip())))
>>>  schemaString = "name age"
>>> fields = [StructField(field_name, StringType(), True) for field_name in schemaString.split()]
>>> schema = StructType(fields)
>>> spark.createDataFrame(people, schema).show()

 

From Spark Data Sources
JSON

>>>  df = spark.read.json("customer.json")
>>> df.show()

>>>  df2 = spark.read.load("people.json", format="json")

Parquet files

>>> df3 = spark.read.load("users.parquet")

TXT files

>>> df4 = spark.read.text("people.txt")

Filter 

#Filter entries of age, only keep those records of which the values are >24
>>> df.filter(df["age"]>24).show()

Duplicate Values 

>>> df = df.dropDuplicates()

Queries 
 

>>> from pyspark.sql import functions as F

Select

>>> df.select("firstName").show() #Show all entries in firstName column
>>> df.select("firstName","lastName") \
      .show()
>>> df.select("firstName", #Show all entries in firstName, age and type
              "age",
              explode("phoneNumber") \
              .alias("contactInfo")) \
      .select("contactInfo.type",
              "firstName",
              "age") \
      .show()
>>> df.select(df["firstName"],df["age"]+ 1) #Show all entries in firstName and age, .show() add 1 to the entries of age
>>> df.select(df['age'] > 24).show() #Show all entries where age >24

When

>>> df.select("firstName", #Show firstName and 0 or 1 depending on age >30
               F.when(df.age > 30, 1) \
              .otherwise(0)) \
      .show()
>>> df[df.firstName.isin("Jane","Boris")] #Show firstName if in the given options
.collect()

Like 

>>> df.select("firstName", #Show firstName, and lastName is TRUE if lastName is like Smith
              df.lastName.like("Smith")) \
     .show()

Startswith - Endswith 

>>> df.select("firstName", #Show firstName, and TRUE if lastName starts with Sm
              df.lastName \
                .startswith("Sm")) \
      .show()
>>> df.select(df.lastName.endswith("th"))\ #Show last names ending in th
      .show()

Substring 

>>> df.select(df.firstName.substr(1, 3) \ #Return substrings of firstName
                          .alias("name")) \
        .collect()

Between 

>>> df.select(df.age.between(22, 24)) \ #Show age: values are TRUE if between 22 and 24
          .show()

Add, Update & Remove Columns 

Adding Columns

 >>> df = df.withColumn('city',df.address.city) \
            .withColumn('postalCode',df.address.postalCode) \
            .withColumn('state',df.address.state) \
            .withColumn('streetAddress',df.address.streetAddress) \
            .withColumn('telePhoneNumber', explode(df.phoneNumber.number)) \
            .withColumn('telePhoneType', explode(df.phoneNumber.type)) 

Updating Columns

>>> df = df.withColumnRenamed('telePhoneNumber', 'phoneNumber')

Removing Columns

  >>> df = df.drop("address", "phoneNumber")
 >>> df = df.drop(df.address).drop(df.phoneNumber)
 

Missing & Replacing Values 
 

>>> df.na.fill(50).show() #Replace null values
 >>> df.na.drop().show() #Return new df omitting rows with null values
 >>> df.na \ #Return new df replacing one value with another
       .replace(10, 20) \
       .show()

GroupBy 

>>> df.groupBy("age")\ #Group by age, count the members in the groups
      .count() \
      .show()

Sort 
 

>>> peopledf.sort(peopledf.age.desc()).collect()
>>> df.sort("age", ascending=False).collect()
>>> df.orderBy(["age","city"],ascending=[0,1])\
     .collect()

Repartitioning 

>>> df.repartition(10)\ #df with 10 partitions
      .rdd \
      .getNumPartitions()
>>> df.coalesce(1).rdd.getNumPartitions() #df with 1 partition

Running Queries Programmatically 
 

Registering DataFrames as Views

>>> peopledf.createGlobalTempView("people")
>>> df.createTempView("customer")
>>> df.createOrReplaceTempView("customer")

Query Views

>>> df5 = spark.sql("SELECT * FROM customer").show()
>>> peopledf2 = spark.sql("SELECT * FROM global_temp.people")\
               .show()

Inspect Data 
 

>>> df.dtypes #Return df column names and data types
>>> df.show() #Display the content of df
>>> df.head() #Return first n rows
>>> df.first() #Return first row
>>> df.take(2) #Return the first n rows >>> df.schema Return the schema of df
>>> df.describe().show() #Compute summary statistics >>> df.columns Return the columns of df
>>> df.count() #Count the number of rows in df
>>> df.distinct().count() #Count the number of distinct rows in df
>>> df.printSchema() #Print the schema of df
>>> df.explain() #Print the (logical and physical) plans

Output

Data Structures 
 

 >>> rdd1 = df.rdd #Convert df into an RDD
 >>> df.toJSON().first() #Convert df into a RDD of string
 >>> df.toPandas() #Return the contents of df as Pandas DataFrame

Write & Save to Files 

>>> df.select("firstName", "city")\
       .write \
       .save("nameAndCity.parquet")
 >>> df.select("firstName", "age") \
       .write \
       .save("namesAndAges.json",format="json")

Stopping SparkSession 

>>> spark.stop()

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#pyspark #cheatsheet #spark #dataframes #python #bigdata

Royce  Reinger

Royce Reinger

1659330128

Calculates Edit Distance using Damerau-Levenshtein Algorithm

damerau-levenshtein

The damerau-levenshtein gem allows to find edit distance between two UTF-8 or ASCII encoded strings with O(N*M) efficiency.

This gem implements pure Levenshtein algorithm, Damerau modification of it (where 2 character transposition counts as 1 edit distance). It also includes Boehmer & Rees 2008 modification of Damerau algorithm, where transposition of bigger than 1 character blocks is taken in account as well (Rees 2014).

require "damerau-levenshtein"
DamerauLevenshtein.distance("Something", "Smoething") #returns 1

It also returns a diff between two strings according to Levenshtein alrorithm. The diff is expressed by tags <ins>, <del>, and <subst>. Such tags make it possible to highlight differnce between strings in a flexible way.

require "damerau-levenshtein"
differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
differ.run("corn", "cron")
# output: ["c<subst>or</subst>n", "c<subst>ro</subst>n"]

Dependencies

sudo apt-get install build-essential libgmp3-dev

Installation

gem install damerau-levenshtein

Examples

require "damerau-levenshtein"
dl = DamerauLevenshtein
  • compare using Damerau Levenshtein algorithm
dl.distance("Something", "Smoething") #returns 1
  • compare using Levensthein algorithm
dl.distance("Something", "Smoething", 0) #returns 2
  • compare using Boehmer & Rees modification
dl.distance("Something", "meSothing", 2) #returns 2 instead of 4
  • comparison of words with UTF-8 characters should work fine:
dl.distance("Sjöstedt", "Sjostedt") #returns 1
  • compare two arrays
dl.array_distance([1,2,3,5], [1,2,3,4]) #returns 1
  • return diff between two strings
differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
differ.run("Something", "smthg")
  • return diff between two strings in raw format
differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
differ.format = :raw
differ.run("Something", "smthg")

API Description

Methods

DamerauLevenshtein.version

DamerauLevenshtein.version
#returns version number of the gem

DamerauLevenshtein.distance

DamerauLevenshtein.distance(string1, string2, block_size, max_distance)
#returns edit distance between 2 strings

DamerauLevenshtein.string_distance(string1, string2, block_size, max_distance)
# an alias for .distance

DamerauLevenshtein.array_distance(array1, array2, block_size, max_distance)
# returns edit distance between 2 arrays of integers

DamerauLevenshtein.distance and .array_distance take 4 arguments:

  • string1 (array1 for .array_distance)
  • string2 (array2 for .array_distance)
  • block_size (default is 1)
  • max_distance (default is 10)

block_size determines maximum number of characters in a transposition block:

block_size = 0
(transposition does not count -- it is a pure Levenshtein algorithm)

block_size = 1
(transposition between 2 adjustent characters --
it is pure Damerau-Levenshtein algorithm)

block_size = 2
(transposition between blocks as big as 2 characters -- so abcd and cdab
counts as edit distance 2, not 4)

block_size = 3
(transposition between blocks as big as 3 characters --
so abcdef and defabc counts as edit distance 3, not 6)

etc.

max_distance -- is a threshold after which algorithm gives up and returns max_distance instead of real edit distance.

Levenshtein algorithm is expensive, so it makes sense to give up when edit distance is becoming too big. The argument max_distance does just that.


DamerauLevenshtein.distance("abcdefg", "1234567", 0, 3)
# output: 4 -- it gave up when edit distance exceeded 3

DamerauLevenshtein::Differ

differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new creates an instance of new differ class to return difference between two strings

differ.format shows current format for diff. Default is :tag format

differ.format = :raw changes current format for diffs. Possible values are :tag and :raw

differ.run("String1", "String2") returns difference between two strings.

For example:

differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
differ.run("Something", "smthng")
# output: ["<ins>S</ins><subst>o</subst>m<ins>e</ins>th<ins>i</ins>ng",
#          "<del>S</del><subst>s</subst>m<del>e</del>th<del>i</del>ng"]

Or with parsing:

require "damerau-levenshtein"
require "nokogiri"

differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
res = differ.run("Something", "Smothing!")
nodes = Nokogiri::XML("<root>#{res.first}</root>")

markup = nodes.root.children.map do |n|
  case n.name
  when "text"
    n.text
  when "del"
    "~~#{n.children.first.text}~~"
  when "ins"
    "*#{n.children.first.text}*"
  when "subst"
    "**#{n.children.first.text}**"
  end
end.join("")

puts markup

Output

S*o*m**e**thing~~!~~

Contributing to damerau-levenshtein

  • Check out the latest master to make sure the feature hasn't been implemented or the bug hasn't been fixed yet
  • Check out the issue tracker to make sure someone already hasn't requested it and/or contributed it
  • Fork the project
  • Start a feature/bugfix branch
  • Commit and push until you are happy with your contribution
  • Make sure to add tests for it. This is important so I don't break it in a future version unintentionally.
  • Please try not to mess with the Rakefile, version, or history. If you want to have your own version, or is otherwise necessary, that is fine, but please isolate to its own commit so I can cherry-pick around it.

Versioning

This gem is following practices of Semantic Versioning

Download Details: 

Author: GlobalNamesArchitecture
Source Code: https://github.com/GlobalNamesArchitecture/damerau-levenshtein 
License: MIT license

#ruby #algorithm 

CODE VN

CODE VN

1637563159

Tìm kiếm tuyến tính bằng Python

Trong bài đăng python này, bạn sẽ tìm hiểu những điều sau:

  • Tìm kiếm tuyến tính là gì?
  • Thuật toán tìm kiếm tuyến tính
  • Viết chương trình Python để tìm kiếm tuyến tính bằng While Loop
  • Viết chương trình Python để tìm kiếm tuyến tính bằng For Loop
  • Tìm kiếm tuyến tính trong Chương trình Python sử dụng Đệ quy

Tìm kiếm tuyến tính là gì?

Trước hết, Tìm kiếm tuyến tính, còn được gọi là tìm kiếm tuần tự, phương pháp này được sử dụng để tìm một phần tử trong danh sách hoặc mảng. Nó kiểm tra từng phần tử của danh sách một / tuần tự cho đến khi tìm thấy một kết quả phù hợp hoặc toàn bộ danh sách đã được tìm kiếm.

Thuật toán tìm kiếm tuyến tính

Triển khai tìm kiếm tuyến tính theo các bước sau:

  • Duyệt qua danh sách / mảng bằng cách sử dụng một vòng lặp.
  • Trong mỗi lần lặp, hãy liên kết  target giá trị với giá trị đã cho của danh sách / mảng.
    • Nếu các giá trị khớp, trả về chỉ mục hiện tại của danh sách / mảng.
    • Nếu không, hãy chuyển sang phần tử mảng / danh sách tiếp theo.
  • Nếu không tìm thấy kết quả phù hợp, hãy quay lại  -1.

Viết chương trình Python để tìm kiếm tuyến tính bằng While Loop

# python program for linear search using while loop

#define list
lst = []

#take input list size
num = int(input("Enter size of list :- "))

for n in range(num):
    #append element in list/array
    numbers = int(input("Enter the array of %d element :- " %n))
    lst.append(numbers)

#take input number to be find in list   
x = int(input("Enter number to search in list :- "))

i = 0
flag = False

while i < len(lst):
	if lst[i] == x:
		flag = True
		break

	i = i + 1

if flag == 1:
	print('{} was found at index {}.'.format(x, i))
else:
	print('{} was not found.'.format(x))

Sau khi thực hiện chương trình, kết quả đầu ra sẽ là:

Enter size of list :-  5
Enter the array of 0 element :-  10
Enter the array of 1 element :-  23
Enter the array of 2 element :-  56
Enter the array of 3 element :-  89
Enter the array of 4 element :-  200
Enter number to search in list :-  89
89 was found at index 3.

Viết chương trình Python để tìm kiếm tuyến tính bằng For Loop

# python program for linear search using for loop

#define list
lst = []

#take input list size
num = int(input("Enter size of list :- "))

for n in range(num):
    #append element in list/array
    numbers = int(input("Enter the array of %d element :- " %n))
    lst.append(numbers)

#take input number to be find in list   
x = int(input("Enter number to search in list :- "))

i = 0
flag = False

for i in range(len(lst)):
    if lst[i] == x:
        flag = True
        break

if flag == 1:
	print('{} was found at index {}.'.format(x, i))
else:
	print('{} was not found.'.format(x))

Sau khi thực hiện chương trình, kết quả đầu ra sẽ là:

Enter size of list :-  6
Enter the array of 0 element :-  25
Enter the array of 1 element :-  50
Enter the array of 2 element :-  100
Enter the array of 3 element :-  200
Enter the array of 4 element :-  250
Enter the array of 5 element :-  650
Enter number to search in list :-  200
200 was found at index 3.

Tìm kiếm tuyến tính trong Chương trình Python sử dụng Đệ quy

# python program for linear search using for loop

#define list
lst = []

#take input list size
num = int(input("Enter size of list :- "))

for n in range(num):
    #append element in list/array
    numbers = int(input("Enter the array of %d element :- " %n))
    lst.append(numbers)

#take input number to be find in list   
x = int(input("Enter number to search in list :- "))

# Recursive function to linear search x in arr[l..r]  
def recLinearSearch( arr, l, r, x): 
    if r < l: 
        return -1
    if arr[l] == x: 
        return l 
    if arr[r] == x: 
        return r 
    return recLinearSearch(arr, l+1, r-1, x) 

res = recLinearSearch(lst, 0, len(lst)-1, x) 

if res != -1:
	print('{} was found at index {}.'.format(x, res))
else:
	print('{} was not found.'.format(x))

Sau khi thực hiện chương trình, kết quả đầu ra sẽ là:

Enter size of list :-  5
Enter the array of 0 element :-  14
Enter the array of 1 element :-  25
Enter the array of 2 element :-  63
Enter the array of 3 element :-  42
Enter the array of 4 element :-  78
Enter number to search in list :-  78
78 was found at index 4.