Kole  Haag

Kole Haag

1597723200

TensorFlow.js & Testing Web Accessibility || Frontend Love Virtual Meetup

Frontend Love Virtual Meetup

Date: Thursday 20th August
Time: 19:30 CEST

  1. Håkan Silfvernagel
    Machine learning in the browser with TensorFlow.js

In order to start out with machine learning you typically would need to learn Python, Tensorflow, Jupyter Notebook etc. But what if you could run your machine learning straight in the browser. This can be done through Tensorflow.js. In this session you will get an introduction so that you can use it in your own projects.

This session will give you an introduction to what Machine learning is and what types of problem you can solve. TensorFlow as a library will be introduced and then TensorFlow.js will be presented with a focus on how you can use a machine learning model in your JavaScript application.

Next, we will build an image classification web app that uses a predefined TensorFlow model.

Finally, some examples on how TensorFlow.js is used in commercial applications will be given.

  1. Adrián Bolonio
    Testing Web Accessibility

When we develop a new web application, we often put a lot of work on the design, on making it beautiful and usable. In other words, we want our web app to be effective, efficient, and satisfying for the user. But a lot of times we don’t think about the user experience for people with disabilities, including people with age-related impairments.

For the web, accessibility (a11y ) means that people with disabilities can perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with websites and tools, and that they can contribute equally without barriers.” (Source: W3C - Web Accessibility Initiative). Our role as frontend and web developers is to create clear interfaces to make people understand and care about data, independently of their disabilities or impairments, but what we, developers, often forget is to ensure that the code we write follows the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), and the only way to achieve that is testing, either manual or automated.

Automated web a11y tests can free up our QA team from manual testing every part of our application…but…they can’t automatically, and magically, make our site accessible.

We should use automated a11y tests as one step of a larger testing process. Don’t forget that only 20% to 50% of all accessibility issues can automatically be detected.

I will show you some testing tools, libraries and techniques to increase the a11y test coverage of your code with a simple React application example.

#coding #testing #live #tensorflow.js #testing web

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

TensorFlow.js & Testing Web Accessibility || Frontend Love Virtual Meetup
Kole  Haag

Kole Haag

1597723200

TensorFlow.js & Testing Web Accessibility || Frontend Love Virtual Meetup

Frontend Love Virtual Meetup

Date: Thursday 20th August
Time: 19:30 CEST

  1. Håkan Silfvernagel
    Machine learning in the browser with TensorFlow.js

In order to start out with machine learning you typically would need to learn Python, Tensorflow, Jupyter Notebook etc. But what if you could run your machine learning straight in the browser. This can be done through Tensorflow.js. In this session you will get an introduction so that you can use it in your own projects.

This session will give you an introduction to what Machine learning is and what types of problem you can solve. TensorFlow as a library will be introduced and then TensorFlow.js will be presented with a focus on how you can use a machine learning model in your JavaScript application.

Next, we will build an image classification web app that uses a predefined TensorFlow model.

Finally, some examples on how TensorFlow.js is used in commercial applications will be given.

  1. Adrián Bolonio
    Testing Web Accessibility

When we develop a new web application, we often put a lot of work on the design, on making it beautiful and usable. In other words, we want our web app to be effective, efficient, and satisfying for the user. But a lot of times we don’t think about the user experience for people with disabilities, including people with age-related impairments.

For the web, accessibility (a11y ) means that people with disabilities can perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with websites and tools, and that they can contribute equally without barriers.” (Source: W3C - Web Accessibility Initiative). Our role as frontend and web developers is to create clear interfaces to make people understand and care about data, independently of their disabilities or impairments, but what we, developers, often forget is to ensure that the code we write follows the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), and the only way to achieve that is testing, either manual or automated.

Automated web a11y tests can free up our QA team from manual testing every part of our application…but…they can’t automatically, and magically, make our site accessible.

We should use automated a11y tests as one step of a larger testing process. Don’t forget that only 20% to 50% of all accessibility issues can automatically be detected.

I will show you some testing tools, libraries and techniques to increase the a11y test coverage of your code with a simple React application example.

#coding #testing #live #tensorflow.js #testing web

Lia  Haley

Lia Haley

1598876400

The World Needs Web Accessibility Now More Than Ever

A background with a top view of a laptop keyboard and text that reads, the web has become less accessible.

I attended a talk last year by Mike Gifford where he said, “the web has actually become LESS accessible since 2011.”

It’s cheap and easy for anyone to create a website these days, and hardly anyone considers accessibility. And why would you? If it’s not in your daily purview, it’s not going into your list of website requirements. Heck, most people don’t even think of the end user, Disabled or not, when creating a website. Especially not when they use a “drag and drop” style website creation platform. Nothing against those, just that those platforms often don’t have accessibility built in, and it’s very difficult to make them so, even if you had the desire.

The other aspect working against website accessibility is when you say the word, ‘accessibility’ not every even has a concept of what that means. I asked a website designer recently if he makes accessible websites, and he said, “yes…we add alt-tags to all our images.” Ummmm, OK. Great. But can a screen reader read your website?

So let’s dispel some myths and dive a bit into the world of what it means to implement web accessibility.

First off, it’s important to note that the USA actually has very clear legislation regarding accessibility. It’s called the Americans With Disabilities Act, and it includes websites. US-based companies should be aware that not having a minimally accessible business website can leave you open to a law suit and fines. I’m Canadian with a Canadian registered company, so I do not actually have to worry about getting sued for not having an accessible website, but bonus, I have one anyway! I’ll explain why it’s beneficial to have an accessible website even if you are not a US-based company.

#accessibility #web-accessibility #accessibility-design #accessibility-testing #amazon web services

A Demo Code Of Training and Testing using Tensorflow

ProbFace, arxiv

This is a demo code of training and testing [ProbFace] using Tensorflow. ProbFace is a reliable Probabilistic Face Embeddging (PFE) method. The representation of each face will be an Guassian distribution parametrized by (mu, sigma), where mu is the original embedding and sigma is the learned uncertainty. Experiments show that ProbFace could

  • improve the robustness of PFE.
  • simplify the calculation of the multal likelihood score (MLS).
  • improve the recognition performance on the risk-controlled scenarios.

#machine learning #tensorflow #testing #a demo code of training and testing using tensorflow #a demo code of training #testing using tensorflow

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623941220

Advance Web Penetration Testing Tool For Python

Features 🎭

Admin Panel Finder

Admin Scanner

Dork Generator

Advance Dork Finder

Extract Links

No Redirect

Hash Crack (Online-Database)

Hash Crack (Wordlist)

Whois Lookup

Tcp Port Scan

Geo IP Lookup

Reserve Analysts Search

Csrf Vernavility Checker

Dns-Lookup,Zone-Transfer,Reserve-IP-Lookup,Http-Headers,Subnet-Lookup

WordPress Username Finder

#testing #advance web penetration testing tool for python #python #advance web penetration #testing tool for python #web

Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1596754901

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr