Learn localStorage in JavaScript by building a project!

Learn localStorage in JavaScript by building a project!

Starter code: https://github.com/max-programming/localstorage-tutorial

https://youtu.be/U693xrQKFy4

#javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Learn localStorage in JavaScript by building a project!
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1593867420

Top Android Projects with Source Code

Android Projects with Source Code – Your entry pass into the world of Android

Hello Everyone, welcome to this article, which is going to be really important to all those who’re in dilemma for their projects and the project submissions. This article is also going to help you if you’re an enthusiast looking forward to explore and enhance your Android skills. The reason is that we’re here to provide you the best ideas of Android Project with source code that you can choose as per your choice.

These project ideas are simple suggestions to help you deal with the difficulty of choosing the correct projects. In this article, we’ll see the project ideas from beginners level and later we’ll move on to intermediate to advance.

top android projects with source code

Android Projects with Source Code

Before working on real-time projects, it is recommended to create a sample hello world project in android studio and get a flavor of project creation as well as execution: Create your first android project

Android Projects for beginners

1. Calculator

build a simple calculator app in android studio source code

Android Project: A calculator will be an easy application if you have just learned Android and coding for Java. This Application will simply take the input values and the operation to be performed from the users. After taking the input it’ll return the results to them on the screen. This is a really easy application and doesn’t need use of any particular package.

To make a calculator you’d need Android IDE, Kotlin/Java for coding, and for layout of your application, you’d need XML or JSON. For this, coding would be the same as that in any language, but in the form of an application. Not to forget creating a calculator initially will increase your logical thinking.

Once the user installs the calculator, they’re ready to use it even without the internet. They’ll enter the values, and the application will show them the value after performing the given operations on the entered operands.

Source Code: Simple Calculator Project

2. A Reminder App

Android Project: This is a good project for beginners. A Reminder App can help you set reminders for different events that you have throughout the day. It’ll help you stay updated with all your tasks for the day. It can be useful for all those who are not so good at organizing their plans and forget easily. This would be a simple application just whose task would be just to remind you of something at a particular time.

To make a Reminder App you need to code in Kotlin/Java and design the layout using XML or JSON. For the functionality of the app, you’d need to make use of AlarmManager Class and Notifications in Android.

In this, the user would be able to set reminders and time in the application. Users can schedule reminders that would remind them to drink water again and again throughout the day. Or to remind them of their medications.

3. Quiz Application

Android Project: Another beginner’s level project Idea can be a Quiz Application in android. Here you can provide the users with Quiz on various general knowledge topics. These practices will ensure that you’re able to set the layouts properly and slowly increase your pace of learning the Android application development. In this you’ll learn to use various Layout components at the same time understanding them better.

To make a quiz application you’ll need to code in Java and set layouts using xml or java whichever you prefer. You can also use JSON for the layouts whichever preferable.

In the app, questions would be asked and answers would be shown as multiple choices. The user selects the answer and gets shown on the screen if the answers are correct. In the end the final marks would be shown to the users.

4. Simple Tic-Tac-Toe

android project tic tac toe game app

Android Project: Tic-Tac-Toe is a nice game, I guess most of you all are well aware of it. This will be a game for two players. In this android game, users would be putting X and O in the given 9 parts of a box one by one. The first player to arrange X or O in an adjacent line of three wins.

To build this game, you’d need Java and XML for Android Studio. And simply apply the logic on that. This game will have a set of three matches. So, it’ll also have a scoreboard. This scoreboard will show the final result at the end of one complete set.

Upon entering the game they’ll enter their names. And that’s when the game begins. They’ll touch one of the empty boxes present there and get their turn one by one. At the end of the game, there would be a winner declared.

Source Code: Tic Tac Toe Game Project

5. Stopwatch

Android Project: A stopwatch is another simple android project idea that will work the same as a normal handheld timepiece that measures the time elapsed between its activation and deactivation. This application will have three buttons that are: start, stop, and hold.

This application would need to use Java and XML. For this application, we need to set the timer properly as it is initially set to milliseconds, and that should be converted to minutes and then hours properly. The users can use this application and all they’d need to do is, start the stopwatch and then stop it when they are done. They can also pause the timer and continue it again when they like.

6. To Do App

Android Project: This is another very simple project idea for you as a beginner. This application as the name suggests will be a To-Do list holding app. It’ll store the users schedules and their upcoming meetings or events. In this application, users will be enabled to write their important notes as well. To make it safe, provide a login page before the user can access it.

So, this app will have a login page, sign-up page, logout system, and the area to write their tasks, events, or important notes. You can build it in android studio using Java and XML at ease. Using XML you can build the user interface as user-friendly as you can. And to store the users’ data, you can use SQLite enabling the users to even delete the data permanently.

Now for users, they will sign up and get access to the write section. Here the users can note down the things and store them permanently. Users can also alter the data or delete them. Finally, they can logout and also, login again and again whenever they like.

7. Roman to decimal converter

Android Project: This app is aimed at the conversion of Roman numbers to their significant decimal number. It’ll help to check the meaning of the roman numbers. Moreover, it will be easy to develop and will help you get your hands on coding and Android.

You need to use Android Studio, Java for coding and XML for interface. The application will take input from the users and convert them to decimal. Once it converts the Roman no. into decimal, it will show the results on the screen.

The users are supposed to just enter the Roman Number and they’ll get the decimal values on the screen. This can be a good android project for final year students.

8. Virtual Dice Roller

Android Project: Well, coming to this part that is Virtual Dice or a random no. generator. It is another simple but interesting app for computer science students. The only task that it would need to do would be to generate a number randomly. This can help people who’re often confused between two or more things.

Using a simple random number generator you can actually create something as good as this. All you’d need to do is get you hands-on OnClick listeners. And a good layout would be cherry on the cake.

The user’s task would be to set the range of the numbers and then click on the roll button. And the app will show them a randomly generated number. Isn’t it interesting ? Try soon!

9. A Scientific Calculator App

Android Project: This application is very important for you as a beginner as it will let you use your logical thinking and improve your programming skills. This is a scientific calculator that will help the users to do various calculations at ease.

To make this application you’d need to use Android Studio. Here you’d need to use arithmetic logics for the calculations. The user would need to give input to the application that will be in terms of numbers. After that, the user will give the operator as an input. Then the Application will calculate and generate the result on the user screen.

10. SMS App

Android Project: An SMS app is another easy but effective idea. It will let you send the SMS to various no. just in the same way as you use the default messaging application in your phone. This project will help you with better understanding of SMSManager in Android.

For this application, you would need to implement Java class SMSManager in Android. For the Layout you can use XML or JSON. Implementing SMSManager into the app is an easy task, so you would love this.

The user would be provided with the facility to text to whichever number they wish also, they’d be able to choose the numbers from the contact list. Another thing would be the Textbox, where they’ll enter their message. Once the message is entered they can happily click on the send button.

#android tutorials #android application final year project #android mini projects #android project for beginners #android project ideas #android project ideas for beginners #android projects #android projects for students #android projects with source code #android topics list #intermediate android projects #real-time android projects

Sival Alethea

Sival Alethea

1624298400

Learn JavaScript - Full Course for Beginners. DO NOT MISS!!!

This complete 134-part JavaScript tutorial for beginners will teach you everything you need to know to get started with the JavaScript programming language.
⭐️Course Contents⭐️
0:00:00 Introduction
0:01:24 Running JavaScript
0:04:23 Comment Your Code
0:05:56 Declare Variables
0:06:15 Storing Values with the Assignment Operator
0:11:31 Initializing Variables with the Assignment Operator
0:11:58 Uninitialized Variables
0:12:40 Case Sensitivity in Variables
0:14:05 Add Two Numbers
0:14:34 Subtract One Number from Another
0:14:52 Multiply Two Numbers
0:15:12 Dividing Numbers
0:15:30 Increment
0:15:58 Decrement
0:16:22 Decimal Numbers
0:16:48 Multiply Two Decimals
0:17:18 Divide Decimals
0:17:33 Finding a Remainder
0:18:22 Augmented Addition
0:19:22 Augmented Subtraction
0:20:18 Augmented Multiplication
0:20:51 Augmented Division
0:21:19 Declare String Variables
0:22:01 Escaping Literal Quotes
0:23:44 Quoting Strings with Single Quotes
0:25:18 Escape Sequences
0:26:46 Plus Operator
0:27:49 Plus Equals Operator
0:29:01 Constructing Strings with Variables
0:30:14 Appending Variables to Strings
0:31:11 Length of a String
0:32:01 Bracket Notation
0:33:27 Understand String Immutability
0:34:23 Find the Nth Character
0:34:51 Find the Last Character
0:35:48 Find the Nth-to-Last Character
0:36:28 Word Blanks
0:40:44 Arrays
0:41:43 Nest Arrays
0:42:33 Access Array Data
0:43:34 Modify Array Data
0:44:48 Access Multi-Dimensional Arrays
0:46:30 push()
0:47:29 pop()
0:48:33 shift()
0:49:23 unshift()
0:50:36 Shopping List
0:51:41 Write Reusable with Functions
0:53:41 Arguments
0:55:43 Global Scope
0:59:31 Local Scope
1:00:46 Global vs Local Scope in Functions
1:02:40 Return a Value from a Function
1:03:55 Undefined Value returned
1:04:52 Assignment with a Returned Value
1:05:52 Stand in Line
1:08:41 Boolean Values
1:09:24 If Statements
1:11:51 Equality Operator
1:13:18 Strict Equality Operator
1:14:43 Comparing different values
1:15:38 Inequality Operator
1:16:20 Strict Inequality Operator
1:17:05 Greater Than Operator
1:17:39 Greater Than Or Equal To Operator
1:18:09 Less Than Operator
1:18:44 Less Than Or Equal To Operator
1:19:17 And Operator
1:20:41 Or Operator
1:21:37 Else Statements
1:22:27 Else If Statements
1:23:30 Logical Order in If Else Statements
1:24:45 Chaining If Else Statements
1:27:45 Golf Code
1:32:15 Switch Statements
1:35:46 Default Option in Switch Statements
1:37:23 Identical Options in Switch Statements
1:39:20 Replacing If Else Chains with Switch
1:41:11 Returning Boolean Values from Functions
1:42:20 Return Early Pattern for Functions
1:43:38 Counting Cards
1:49:11 Build Objects
1:50:46 Dot Notation
1:51:33 Bracket Notation
1:52:47 Variables
1:53:34 Updating Object Properties
1:54:30 Add New Properties to Object
1:55:19 Delete Properties from Object
1:55:54 Objects for Lookups
1:57:43 Testing Objects for Properties
1:59:15 Manipulating Complex Objects
2:01:00 Nested Objects
2:01:53 Nested Arrays
2:03:06 Record Collection
2:10:15 While Loops
2:11:35 For Loops
2:13:56 Odd Numbers With a For Loop
2:15:28 Count Backwards With a For Loop
2:17:08 Iterate Through an Array with a For Loop
2:19:43 Nesting For Loops
2:22:45 Do…While Loops
2:24:12 Profile Lookup
2:28:18 Random Fractions
2:28:54 Random Whole Numbers
2:30:21 Random Whole Numbers within a Range
2:31:46 parseInt Function
2:32:36 parseInt Function with a Radix
2:33:29 Ternary Operator
2:34:57 Multiple Ternary Operators
2:36:57 var vs let
2:39:02 var vs let scopes
2:41:32 const Keyword
2:43:40 Mutate an Array Declared with const
2:44:52 Prevent Object Mutation
2:47:17 Arrow Functions
2:28:24 Arrow Functions with Parameters
2:49:27 Higher Order Arrow Functions
2:53:04 Default Parameters
2:54:00 Rest Operator
2:55:31 Spread Operator
2:57:18 Destructuring Assignment: Objects
3:00:18 Destructuring Assignment: Nested Objects
3:01:55 Destructuring Assignment: Arrays
3:03:40 Destructuring Assignment with Rest Operator to Reassign Array
3:05:05 Destructuring Assignment to Pass an Object
3:06:39 Template Literals
3:10:43 Simple Fields
3:12:24 Declarative Functions
3:12:56 class Syntax
3:15:11 getters and setters
3:20:25 import vs require
3:22:33 export
3:23:40 * to Import
3:24:50 export default
3:25:26 Import a Default Export
📺 The video in this post was made by freeCodeCamp.org
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkZNo7MFNFg&list=PLWKjhJtqVAblfum5WiQblKPwIbqYXkDoC&index=4

🔥 If you’re a beginner. I believe the article below will be useful to you ☞ What You Should Know Before Investing in Cryptocurrency - For Beginner
⭐ ⭐ ⭐The project is of interest to the community. Join to Get free ‘GEEK coin’ (GEEKCASH coin)!
☞ **-----CLICK HERE-----**⭐ ⭐ ⭐
Thanks for visiting and watching! Please don’t forget to leave a like, comment and share!

#javascript #learn javascript #learn javascript for beginners #learn javascript - full course for beginners #javascript programming language

Learning JavaScript: Working with Strings

Strings are the second most common data type used in JavaScript, and in many cases, since JavaScript is so widely used for web applications, it is the prominent data type. In this article I’ll discuss how strings work in JavaScript and how to work with them efficiently and effectively. I’ll also discuss some newer abilities of strings that are just being discovered and used.

Strings Defined

A string is any set of 0 or more characters enclosed in either single quotes or double quotes. The characters in a string can be alphabetic characters, numbers, symbols, and spaces. Here are some examples of JavaScript string literals:

"hello world"
'good bye, world!'
"1600 Pennsylvania Avenue"
'$*&!@ it!'

If you are using single quotes in your string, and you need to embed a single quote to write out a contraction, you use the backslash character (\) as an escape character. To see why you need to do this, let’s look at what happens when you don’t escape a single quote by writing out such a string in the JavaScript shell:

js> 'can't'
typein:1:5 SyntaxError: unexpected token: identifier:
typein:1:5 'can't'
typein:1:5 .....^

The interpreter can’t figure out what to do with the ‘t’ after the single quote.

Now watch what happens when we escape the single quote:

js> 'can\'t'
"can't"

The escape character tells the interpreter to treat the single quote as an apostrophe and not as an “end-of-string” character.

You can embed other characters into a string, including the newline character (\n) and the tab character (\t). Here are some examples using the shell:

js> print("Hello, \n world!");
Hello,
world!
js> print("Hello, \tworld");
Hello,  world

#javascript-training #learn-to-code #learn-to-program #javascript #javascript-tutorial #deep learning

Learning JavaScript: Computing with Object Methods

JavaScript has a set of built-in methods you can use with your user-defined objects. In this article I’m going to discuss several of these methods and how you can use them in your JavaScript programs.

Object.assign

The Object.assign method is used to make a copy of one object into another object. The syntax template for this method is:

Object.assign(target, source);

where source is the object you are copying from and target is the object you are copying into. This method returns the target object if you want to assign it.

Here is a sample program that demonstrates how to use Object.assign:

function Student(name, id, grades) {
  this.name = name;
  this.id = id;
  this.grades = grades;
}
let st1 = new Student("",0,[]);
et st2 = new Student("Jane Doe", 123, [91, 92, 93]);
Object.assign(st1, st2);
print(`${st1.name}, ${st1.id}\n[${st1.grades}]`);

The output from this program is:

Jane Doe, 123
[91, 92, 93]

A good reason to use this method is to make sure that a new object has all the properties and values of the old object. You may accidentally leave something out when writing your own method, while Object.assign will systematically make sure all properties and values are assigned to the new object.

Object.create

The Object.create method creates a new object from an existing object prototype. Here is the syntax template for this method:

const|let|var object-name = Object.create(existing-object);

Let’s look at a few examples to see how this method works in practice. The first example creates a new object from a function and then creates a second object using Object.create:

function Student(name, id, grades) {
  this.name = name;
  this.id = id;
  this.grades = grades;
}
let st1 = new Student("Bob Green", 1234, [81, 77, 92]);
print(`${st1.name}, ${st1.id}\n${st1.grades}`);
let st2 = Object.create(st1);
print(`${st2.name}, ${st2.id}\n${st2.grades}`);

The output from this program is:

Bob Green, 1234
81,77,92
Bob Green, 1234
81,77,92

Code must be written to change the properties of the newly created object.

#learn-to-code #javascript-development #learn-to-program #javascript #learning-javascript

Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1596632340

Learning JavaScript: Statements, Arithmetic, and Math

In this article I will discuss how to perform arithmetic and more advanced mathematical operations in JavaScript. First, though, I need to discuss how statements are formed and used in JavaScript.

Statements

JavaScript programs are made up of statements. A statement can be anything from a single function call or command to even just a variable name. JavaScript evaluates statements and then executes them.

For example, when you create a variable, you write a statement:

let number = 100;

JavaScript recognizes this as a statement and evaluates it by following its grammar rules. In this case the rule is to assign the expression on the right-hand sign of the assignment operator to the variable on the left-hand side.

As I mentioned above, a statement can be just an expression, as in the following example:

js> 1;
1

You can do the same thing with a variable:

js> let name = "Brendan";
js> name
"Brendan"

Statements can be much more complicated than these examples, though, as you’ll learn as you get deeper into JavaScript. So far, you have seen examples of two types of statements — variable declaration and assignment statements and print statements.

JavaScript Arithmetic

Arithmetic is performed in JavaScript using the arithmetic operators. There are five arithmetic operators:

  • + (Addition)
  • - (Subtraction)
  • * (Multiplication)
  • / (Division)
  • % (Modulo/Remainder)

These operators are binary operators, meaning there must be values on either side of the operator. The + operator and the -operator can also be used as unary operators, in which can they are used to distinguish the sign (positive or negative) of a number.

The JavaScript arithmetic operators also have an order of operations, or precedence, they follow when used in a statement. The order of operations is: 1) modulo; 2) multiplication and division; 3) addition and subtraction.

You can use parentheses to modify the order of operations. When an arithmetic expression is placed inside parentheses, that expression is evaluated before any other operations.

For example, take the expression:

let n = 100 + 3 * 22;

Does n get the value 2266, 103 * 26, or does the variable get the value 166? Without parentheses the value of n is 166 because the multiplication takes place before the addition due to the precedence of the multiplication operator over the addition operator.

#learn-to-code #learning-javascript #javascript #learn-to-program #deep learning