Norhad Abdull

1605626880

How to Display or Print Some Output in Python

Learn to display or print some output in Python using print function. We can print the output with just one line of code in Python with the print function. Python 3 comes with lots of new features and tricks with the print function. We can use the ‘sep’ parameter to separate the values within print function. We can utilize ‘end’ parameter to determine the ending character of the print function.

We can also use escape character or escape sequence in the print function. Escape character is something that is not treated as the python code and that always starts with backslash i.e. “”. To print the String, we enclose the string within single quotes or double quotes. To print the Number or integers, we don’t use quotes. If we print the number using the quotes, the number will be treated as the string.

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How to Display or Print Some Output in Python
Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619518440

top 30 Python Tips and Tricks for Beginners

Welcome to my Blog , In this article, you are going to learn the top 10 python tips and tricks.

1) swap two numbers.

2) Reversing a string in Python.

3) Create a single string from all the elements in list.

4) Chaining Of Comparison Operators.

5) Print The File Path Of Imported Modules.

6) Return Multiple Values From Functions.

7) Find The Most Frequent Value In A List.

8) Check The Memory Usage Of An Object.

#python #python hacks tricks #python learning tips #python programming tricks #python tips #python tips and tricks #python tips and tricks advanced #python tips and tricks for beginners #python tips tricks and techniques #python tutorial #tips and tricks in python #tips to learn python #top 30 python tips and tricks for beginners

f-strings in Python - Explained with Code Examples

When you're formatting strings in Python, you're probably used to using the format() method.

But in Python 3.6 and later, you can use f-Strings instead. f-Strings, also called formatted string literals, have a more succinct syntax and can be super helpful in string formatting.

In this tutorial, you'll learn about f-strings in Python, and a few different ways you can use them to format strings.

What are f-Strings in Python?

Strings in Python are usually enclosed within double quotes ("" ) or single quotes (''). To create f-strings, you only need to add an f  or an F before the opening quotes of your string.

For example, "This" is a string whereas f"This" is an f-String.

How to Print Variables using Python f-Strings

When using f-Strings to display variables, you only need to specify the names of the variables inside a set of curly braces {}. And at runtime, all variable names will be replaced with their respective values.

If you have multiple variables in the string, you need to enclose each of the variable names inside a set of curly braces.

The syntax is shown below:

f"This is an f-string {var_name} and {var_name}."

▶ Here's an example.

You have two variables, language and school, enclosed in curly braces inside the f-String.

language = "Python"
school = "freeCodeCamp"
print(f"I'm learning {language} from {school}.")

Let's take a look at the output:

#Output
I'm learning Python from freeCodeCamp.

Notice how the variables language and school have been replaced with Python and freeCodeCamp, respectively.

How to Evaluate Expressions with Python f-Strings

As f-Strings are evaluated at runtime, you might as well evaluate valid Python expressions on the fly.

▶ In the example below, num1 and num2 are two variables. To calculate their product, you may insert the expression num1 * num2 inside a set of curly braces.

num1 = 83
num2 = 9
print(f"The product of {num1} and {num2} is {num1 * num2}.")

Notice how num1 * num2 is replaced by the product of num1 and num2 in the output.

#Output
The product of 83 and 9 is 747.

I hope you're now able to see the pattern.

In any f-String, {var_name}, {expression} serve as placeholders for variables and expressions, and are replaced with the corresponding values at runtime.

Head over to the next section to learn more about f-Strings.

How to Use Conditionals in Python f-Strings

Let's start by reviewing Python's if..else statements. The general syntax is shown below:

if condition:
  # do this if condition is True <true_block>
else:
  # do this if condition is False <false_block>

Here, condition is the expression whose truth value is checked.

  • If the condition evaluates to True, the statements in the if block (<true_block>) are executed.
  • If the condition evaluates to False, the statements in the else block (<false_block>) are executed.

There's a more succinct one-line equivalent to the above if..else blocks. The syntax is given below:

<true_block> if <condition> else <false_block>

In the above syntax,<true block> is what's done when the condition is True, and <false_block> is the statement to be executed when the condition is False.

This syntax may seem a bit different if  you haven't seen it before. If it makes things any simpler, you may read it as, "Do this if condition is True; else, do this".

This is often called the ternary operator in Python as it takes 3 operands in some sense – the true block, the condition under test, and the false block.

▶ Let's take a simple example using the ternary operator.

Given a number num, you'd like to check if it's even. You know that a number is even if it's evenly divisible by 2. Let's use this to write our expression, as shown below:

num = 87;
print(f"Is num even? {True if num%2==0 else False}")

In the above code snippet,

  • num%2==0 is the condition.
  • If the condition is True, you just return True indicating that num is indeed even, and False otherwise.
#Output
Is num even? False

In the above example, num is 87, which is odd. Hence the conditional statement in the f-String is replaced with False.

How to Call Methods with Python f-Strings

So far, you've only seen how to print values of variables, evaluate expressions, and use conditionals inside f-Strings. And it's time to level up.

▶ Let's take the following example:

author = "jane smith"
print(f"This is a book by {author}.")

The above code prints out This is a book by jane smith.

Wouldn't it be better if it prints out This is a book by Jane Smith. instead? Yes, and in Python, string methods return modified strings with the requisite changes.

The title() method in Python returns a new string that's formatted in the title case - the way names are usually formatted (First_name Last_name).

To print out the author's name formatted in title case, you can do the following:

  • use the title() method on the string author,
  • store the returned string in another variable, and
  • print it using an f-String, as shown below:
author = "jane smith"
a_name = author.title()
print(f"This is a book by {a_name}.")

#Output
This is a book by Jane Smith.

However, you can do this in just one step with f-Strings. You only need to call the title() method on the string author inside the curly braces within the f-String.

author = "jane smith"
print(f"This is a book by {author.title()}.")

When the f-String is parsed at runtime,

  • the title() method is called on the string author, and
  • the returned string that's formatted in title case is printed out.

You can verify that in the output shown below.

#Output
This is a book by Jane Smith.

You can place method calls on any valid Python object inside the curly braces, and they'll work just fine.

How to Call Functions Inside Python f-Strings

In addition to calling methods on Python objects, you can also call functions inside f-Strings. And it works very similarly to what you've seen before.

Just the way variable names are replaced by values, and expressions are replaced with the result of evaluation, function calls are replaced with the return value from the function.

▶ Let's take the function choice() shown below:

def choice(c):
  if c%2 ==0:
    return "Learn Python!"
  else:
    return "Learn JavaScript!"

The above function returns "Learn Python!" if it's called with an even number as the argument. And it returns "Learn JavaScript!" when the argument in the function call is an odd number.

▶ In the example shown below, you have an f-String that has a call to the choice function inside the curly braces.

print(f"Hello Python, tell me what I should learn. {choice(3)}")

As the argument was an odd number (3), Python suggests that you learn JavaScript, as indicated below:

#Output
Hello Python, tell me what I should learn. Learn JavaScript!

If you call the function choice() with an even number, you see that Python tells you to learn Python instead. 🙂

print(f"Hello Python, tell me what I should learn. {choice(10)}")
#Output
Hello Python, tell me what I should learn. Learn Python!

And that ends our tutorial on a happy note!

Conclusion

In this tutorial, you've learned how you can use f-Strings to:

  • print values of variables,
  • evaluate expressions,
  • call methods on other Python objects, and
  • make calls to Python functions.

Original article at https://www.freecodecamp.org

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Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

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Lambda, Map, Filter functions in python

Welcome to my Blog, In this article, we will learn python lambda function, Map function, and filter function.

Lambda function in python: Lambda is a one line anonymous function and lambda takes any number of arguments but can only have one expression and python lambda syntax is

Syntax: x = lambda arguments : expression

Now i will show you some python lambda function examples:

#python #anonymous function python #filter function in python #lambda #lambda python 3 #map python #python filter #python filter lambda #python lambda #python lambda examples #python map

Art  Lind

Art Lind

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Python Tricks Every Developer Should Know

Python is awesome, it’s one of the easiest languages with simple and intuitive syntax but wait, have you ever thought that there might ways to write your python code simpler?

In this tutorial, you’re going to learn a variety of Python tricks that you can use to write your Python code in a more readable and efficient way like a pro.

Let’s get started

Swapping value in Python

Instead of creating a temporary variable to hold the value of the one while swapping, you can do this instead

>>> FirstName = "kalebu"
>>> LastName = "Jordan"
>>> FirstName, LastName = LastName, FirstName 
>>> print(FirstName, LastName)
('Jordan', 'kalebu')

#python #python-programming #python3 #python-tutorials #learn-python #python-tips #python-skills #python-development

Art  Lind

Art Lind

1602666000

How to Remove all Duplicate Files on your Drive via Python

Today you’re going to learn how to use Python programming in a way that can ultimately save a lot of space on your drive by removing all the duplicates.

Intro

In many situations you may find yourself having duplicates files on your disk and but when it comes to tracking and checking them manually it can tedious.

Heres a solution

Instead of tracking throughout your disk to see if there is a duplicate, you can automate the process using coding, by writing a program to recursively track through the disk and remove all the found duplicates and that’s what this article is about.

But How do we do it?

If we were to read the whole file and then compare it to the rest of the files recursively through the given directory it will take a very long time, then how do we do it?

The answer is hashing, with hashing can generate a given string of letters and numbers which act as the identity of a given file and if we find any other file with the same identity we gonna delete it.

There’s a variety of hashing algorithms out there such as

  • md5
  • sha1
  • sha224, sha256, sha384 and sha512

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