Zara  Bryant

Zara Bryant

1605217020

Essential Advice for Improving your Azure Workloads | Well-Architected

In this episode of the Microsoft Azure Well-Architected Series, Saket Gupta joins David Blank-Edelman to discuss Azure Advisor and share essential advice for improving your Azure workloads.

  • 0:00 Introduction
  • 1:02 How to handle the responsibility of cost optimization, operational excellence, performance efficiency, reliability and security at the workload level
  • 2:30 How Azure Advisor works and how it can help
  • 5:01 Example architecture scenario
  • 7:05 Azure Advisor Demo
  • 14:00 How to manage Azure Advisor recommendations

#azure #programming #developer

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Buddha Community

Essential Advice for Improving your Azure Workloads | Well-Architected

sneha cynix

1588423654

Announcing Azure Private Link

Azure Private Link is a secure and scalable way for Azure customers to consume Azure Services like Azure Storage or SQL, Microsoft Partner Services or their own services privately from their Azure Virtual Network (VNet). The technology is based on a provider and consumer model where the provider and the consumer are both hosted in Azure. A connection is established using a consent-based call flow and once established, all data that flows between the service provider and service consumer is isolated from the internet and stays on the Microsoft network. There is no need for gateways, network address translation (NAT) devices, or public IP addresses to communicate with the service.

Azure Private Link brings Azure services inside the customer’s private VNet. The service resources can be accessed using the private IP address just like any other resource in the VNet. This significantly simplifies the network configuration by keeping access rules private. learn azure architect training online for more techniques.

Private connectivity to Azure PaaS services
Multi-tenant shared services such as Azure Storage and Azure SQL Database are outside your VNet and have been reachable only via the public interface. Today, you can secure this connection using VNet service endpoints which keep the traffic within the Microsoft backbone network and allow the PaaS resource to be locked down to just your VNet. However, the PaaS endpoint is still served over a public IP address and therefore not reachable from on-premises through Azure ExpressRoute private peering or VPN gateway. With today’s announcement of Azure Private Link, you can simply create a private endpoint in your VNet and map it to your PaaS resource (Your Azure Storage account blob or SQL Database server).

These resources are then accessible over a private IP address in your VNet, enabling connectivity from on-premises through Azure ExpressRoute private peering and/or VPN gateway and keep the network configuration simple by not opening it up to public IP addresses.

Private connectivity to your own service
This new offering is not limited to Azure PaaS services, you can leverage it for your own service as well. Today, as a service provider in Azure, you have to make your service accessible over a public interface (IP address) in order for it to be accessible for other consumers running in Azure. You could use VNet peering and connect to the consumer’s VNet to make it private, but it is not scalable and will soon run into IP address conflicts. With today’s announcement, you can run your service completely private in your own VNet behind an Azure Standard Load Balancer, enable it for Azure Private Link, and allow it to be accessed by consumers running in different VNet, subscription, or Azure Active Directory (AD) tenant all using simple clicks and approval call flow.

As a service consumer all you will have to do is create a private endpoint in your own VNet and consume the Azure Private Link service completely private without opening your access control lists (ACLs) to any public IP address space.

Private connectivity to SaaS service
Microsoft’s multiple partners already offer many different software-as-a-service (SaaS) solutions to Azure customers today. These solutions are offered over the public endpoints and to consume these SaaS solutions, Azure customers must open their private networks to the public internet. Customers want to consume these SaaS solutions within their private networks as if they are deployed right within their networks.

The ability to consume the SaaS solutions privately within the customer’s own network has been a common request. With Azure Private Link, we’re extending the private connectivity experience to Microsoft partners. This is a very powerful mechanism for Microsoft partners to reach Azure customers. We’re confident that a lot of future Azure Marketplace offerings will be made through Azure Private Link. microsoft azure architect training helps you to learn more effectively.

Key highlights of Azure Private Link
Private on-premises access: Since PaaS resources are mapped to private IP addresses in the customer’s VNet, they can be accessed via Azure ExpressRoute private peering. This effectively means that the data will traverse a fully private path from on-premises to Azure. The configuration in the corporate firewalls and route tables can be simplified to allow access only to the private IP addresses.

Data exfiltration protection: Azure Private Link is unique with respect to mapping a specific PaaS resource to private IP address as opposed to mapping an entire service as other cloud providers do. This essentially means that any malicious intent to exfiltrate the data to a different account using the same private endpoint will fail, thus providing built-in data exfiltration protection.

Simple to setup: Azure Private Link is simple to setup with minimal networking configuration needed. Connectivity works on an approval call flow and once a PaaS resource is mapped to a private endpoint, the connectivity works out of the box without any additional configurations on route tables and Azure Network Security Groups (NSGs).

Overlapping address space: Traditionally, customers use VNet peering as the mechanism to connect multiple VNets. VNet peering requires the VNets to have non-overlapping address space. In enterprise use cases, its often common to find networks with an overlapping IP address space. Azure Private Link provides an alternative way to privately connect applications in different VNets that have an overlapping IP address space.

Roadmap
Today, we’re announcing Azure Private Link preview in a limited set of regions. We will be expanding to more regions in the near future. In addition, we will also be adding more Azure PaaS services to Azure Private Link including Azure Cosmos DB, Azure MySQL, Azure PostgreSQL, Azure MariaDB, Azure Application Service, and Azure Key Vault, and Partner Services in coming months.

We encourage you to try out the Azure Private Link preview and look forward to hearing and incorporating your feedback. Please refer azure architect course for additional details.

#azure architect course #azure architect training online #azure 300 certification #azure architect certification #azure solution architect certification

Eric  Bukenya

Eric Bukenya

1624713540

Learn NoSQL in Azure: Diving Deeper into Azure Cosmos DB

This article is a part of the series – Learn NoSQL in Azure where we explore Azure Cosmos DB as a part of the non-relational database system used widely for a variety of applications. Azure Cosmos DB is a part of Microsoft’s serverless databases on Azure which is highly scalable and distributed across all locations that run on Azure. It is offered as a platform as a service (PAAS) from Azure and you can develop databases that have a very high throughput and very low latency. Using Azure Cosmos DB, customers can replicate their data across multiple locations across the globe and also across multiple locations within the same region. This makes Cosmos DB a highly available database service with almost 99.999% availability for reads and writes for multi-region modes and almost 99.99% availability for single-region modes.

In this article, we will focus more on how Azure Cosmos DB works behind the scenes and how can you get started with it using the Azure Portal. We will also explore how Cosmos DB is priced and understand the pricing model in detail.

How Azure Cosmos DB works

As already mentioned, Azure Cosmos DB is a multi-modal NoSQL database service that is geographically distributed across multiple Azure locations. This helps customers to deploy the databases across multiple locations around the globe. This is beneficial as it helps to reduce the read latency when the users use the application.

As you can see in the figure above, Azure Cosmos DB is distributed across the globe. Let’s suppose you have a web application that is hosted in India. In that case, the NoSQL database in India will be considered as the master database for writes and all the other databases can be considered as a read replicas. Whenever new data is generated, it is written to the database in India first and then it is synchronized with the other databases.

Consistency Levels

While maintaining data over multiple regions, the most common challenge is the latency as when the data is made available to the other databases. For example, when data is written to the database in India, users from India will be able to see that data sooner than users from the US. This is due to the latency in synchronization between the two regions. In order to overcome this, there are a few modes that customers can choose from and define how often or how soon they want their data to be made available in the other regions. Azure Cosmos DB offers five levels of consistency which are as follows:

  • Strong
  • Bounded staleness
  • Session
  • Consistent prefix
  • Eventual

In most common NoSQL databases, there are only two levels – Strong and EventualStrong being the most consistent level while Eventual is the least. However, as we move from Strong to Eventual, consistency decreases but availability and throughput increase. This is a trade-off that customers need to decide based on the criticality of their applications. If you want to read in more detail about the consistency levels, the official guide from Microsoft is the easiest to understand. You can refer to it here.

Azure Cosmos DB Pricing Model

Now that we have some idea about working with the NoSQL database – Azure Cosmos DB on Azure, let us try to understand how the database is priced. In order to work with any cloud-based services, it is essential that you have a sound knowledge of how the services are charged, otherwise, you might end up paying something much higher than your expectations.

If you browse to the pricing page of Azure Cosmos DB, you can see that there are two modes in which the database services are billed.

  • Database Operations – Whenever you execute or run queries against your NoSQL database, there are some resources being used. Azure terms these usages in terms of Request Units or RU. The amount of RU consumed per second is aggregated and billed
  • Consumed Storage – As you start storing data in your database, it will take up some space in order to store that data. This storage is billed per the standard SSD-based storage across any Azure locations globally

Let’s learn about this in more detail.

#azure #azure cosmos db #nosql #azure #nosql in azure #azure cosmos db

Zara  Bryant

Zara Bryant

1605217020

Essential Advice for Improving your Azure Workloads | Well-Architected

In this episode of the Microsoft Azure Well-Architected Series, Saket Gupta joins David Blank-Edelman to discuss Azure Advisor and share essential advice for improving your Azure workloads.

  • 0:00 Introduction
  • 1:02 How to handle the responsibility of cost optimization, operational excellence, performance efficiency, reliability and security at the workload level
  • 2:30 How Azure Advisor works and how it can help
  • 5:01 Example architecture scenario
  • 7:05 Azure Advisor Demo
  • 14:00 How to manage Azure Advisor recommendations

#azure #programming #developer

Ruthie  Bugala

Ruthie Bugala

1620435660

How to set up Azure Data Sync between Azure SQL databases and on-premises SQL Server

In this article, you learn how to set up Azure Data Sync services. In addition, you will also learn how to create and set up a data sync group between Azure SQL database and on-premises SQL Server.

In this article, you will see:

  • Overview of Azure SQL Data Sync feature
  • Discuss key components
  • Comparison between Azure SQL Data sync with the other Azure Data option
  • Setup Azure SQL Data Sync
  • More…

Azure Data Sync

Azure Data Sync —a synchronization service set up on an Azure SQL Database. This service synchronizes the data across multiple SQL databases. You can set up bi-directional data synchronization where data ingest and egest process happens between the SQL databases—It can be between Azure SQL database and on-premises and/or within the cloud Azure SQL database. At this moment, the only limitation is that it will not support Azure SQL Managed Instance.

#azure #sql azure #azure sql #azure data sync #azure sql #sql server

Ron  Cartwright

Ron Cartwright

1600624800

Getting Started With Azure Event Grid Viewer

In the last article, we had a look at how to start with Azure DevOps: Getting Started With Audit Streaming With Event Grid

In the article, we will go to the next step to create a subscription and use webhook event handlers to view those logs in our Azure web application.

#cloud #tutorial #azure #event driven architecture #realtime #signalr #webhook #azure web services #azure event grid #azure #azure event grid #serverless architecture #application integration