Layla  Gerhold

Layla Gerhold

1597914060

Building and Deploying Explainable AI Dashboards using Dash and SHAP

In recent years, we have seen an explosion in the usage of Machine Learning (ML) algorithms for automating and supporting human decisions. From helping doctors in diagnosing potential diseases that could render diabetic patients blind, to supporting financial analysts in equity management, the impact of ML is irrefutable. However, as algorithms become more sophisticated, it becomes harder to understand how it makes decisions. As a result, various harmful biases could arise in critical situations, such as when ML is used to determine credit limit for credit cards or applied to facial recognition by law enforcement agencies. In order to identify and mitigate the effect of such biases before the model is deployed, it is important to leverage explainable AI (xAI) to better understand which features and factors have the most impact on the final output of the model. This information can then be utilized to help AI developers understand why a certain model might not be performing well in certain scenarios, or just in general. At the same time, such techniques could help us uncover more insights about a problem than simply using black-box models. Ultimately, such techniques can help both technical and non-technical stakeholders better understand and appreciate AI models.

#artificial-intelligence #machine-learning #explainable-ai #dashboard

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Building and Deploying Explainable AI Dashboards using Dash and SHAP
Layla  Gerhold

Layla Gerhold

1597914060

Building and Deploying Explainable AI Dashboards using Dash and SHAP

In recent years, we have seen an explosion in the usage of Machine Learning (ML) algorithms for automating and supporting human decisions. From helping doctors in diagnosing potential diseases that could render diabetic patients blind, to supporting financial analysts in equity management, the impact of ML is irrefutable. However, as algorithms become more sophisticated, it becomes harder to understand how it makes decisions. As a result, various harmful biases could arise in critical situations, such as when ML is used to determine credit limit for credit cards or applied to facial recognition by law enforcement agencies. In order to identify and mitigate the effect of such biases before the model is deployed, it is important to leverage explainable AI (xAI) to better understand which features and factors have the most impact on the final output of the model. This information can then be utilized to help AI developers understand why a certain model might not be performing well in certain scenarios, or just in general. At the same time, such techniques could help us uncover more insights about a problem than simply using black-box models. Ultimately, such techniques can help both technical and non-technical stakeholders better understand and appreciate AI models.

#artificial-intelligence #machine-learning #explainable-ai #dashboard

Otho  Hagenes

Otho Hagenes

1619511840

Making Sales More Efficient: Lead Qualification Using AI

If you were to ask any organization today, you would learn that they are all becoming reliant on Artificial Intelligence Solutions and using AI to digitally transform in order to bring their organizations into the new age. AI is no longer a new concept, instead, with the technological advancements that are being made in the realm of AI, it has become a much-needed business facet.

AI has become easier to use and implement than ever before, and every business is applying AI solutions to their processes. Organizations have begun to base their digital transformation strategies around AI and the way in which they conduct their business. One of these business processes that AI has helped transform is lead qualifications.

#ai-solutions-development #artificial-intelligence #future-of-artificial-intellige #ai #ai-applications #ai-trends #future-of-ai #ai-revolution

Why Use WordPress? What Can You Do With WordPress?

Can you use WordPress for anything other than blogging? To your surprise, yes. WordPress is more than just a blogging tool, and it has helped thousands of websites and web applications to thrive. The use of WordPress powers around 40% of online projects, and today in our blog, we would visit some amazing uses of WordPress other than blogging.
What Is The Use Of WordPress?

WordPress is the most popular website platform in the world. It is the first choice of businesses that want to set a feature-rich and dynamic Content Management System. So, if you ask what WordPress is used for, the answer is – everything. It is a super-flexible, feature-rich and secure platform that offers everything to build unique websites and applications. Let’s start knowing them:

1. Multiple Websites Under A Single Installation
WordPress Multisite allows you to develop multiple sites from a single WordPress installation. You can download WordPress and start building websites you want to launch under a single server. Literally speaking, you can handle hundreds of sites from one single dashboard, which now needs applause.
It is a highly efficient platform that allows you to easily run several websites under the same login credentials. One of the best things about WordPress is the themes it has to offer. You can simply download them and plugin for various sites and save space on sites without losing their speed.

2. WordPress Social Network
WordPress can be used for high-end projects such as Social Media Network. If you don’t have the money and patience to hire a coder and invest months in building a feature-rich social media site, go for WordPress. It is one of the most amazing uses of WordPress. Its stunning CMS is unbeatable. And you can build sites as good as Facebook or Reddit etc. It can just make the process a lot easier.
To set up a social media network, you would have to download a WordPress Plugin called BuddyPress. It would allow you to connect a community page with ease and would provide all the necessary features of a community or social media. It has direct messaging, activity stream, user groups, extended profiles, and so much more. You just have to download and configure it.
If BuddyPress doesn’t meet all your needs, don’t give up on your dreams. You can try out WP Symposium or PeepSo. There are also several themes you can use to build a social network.

3. Create A Forum For Your Brand’s Community
Communities are very important for your business. They help you stay in constant connection with your users and consumers. And allow you to turn them into a loyal customer base. Meanwhile, there are many good technologies that can be used for building a community page – the good old WordPress is still the best.
It is the best community development technology. If you want to build your online community, you need to consider all the amazing features you get with WordPress. Plugins such as BB Press is an open-source, template-driven PHP/ MySQL forum software. It is very simple and doesn’t hamper the experience of the website.
Other tools such as wpFoRo and Asgaros Forum are equally good for creating a community blog. They are lightweight tools that are easy to manage and integrate with your WordPress site easily. However, there is only one tiny problem; you need to have some technical knowledge to build a WordPress Community blog page.

4. Shortcodes
Since we gave you a problem in the previous section, we would also give you a perfect solution for it. You might not know to code, but you have shortcodes. Shortcodes help you execute functions without having to code. It is an easy way to build an amazing website, add new features, customize plugins easily. They are short lines of code, and rather than memorizing multiple lines; you can have zero technical knowledge and start building a feature-rich website or application.
There are also plugins like Shortcoder, Shortcodes Ultimate, and the Basics available on WordPress that can be used, and you would not even have to remember the shortcodes.

5. Build Online Stores
If you still think about why to use WordPress, use it to build an online store. You can start selling your goods online and start selling. It is an affordable technology that helps you build a feature-rich eCommerce store with WordPress.
WooCommerce is an extension of WordPress and is one of the most used eCommerce solutions. WooCommerce holds a 28% share of the global market and is one of the best ways to set up an online store. It allows you to build user-friendly and professional online stores and has thousands of free and paid extensions. Moreover as an open-source platform, and you don’t have to pay for the license.
Apart from WooCommerce, there are Easy Digital Downloads, iThemes Exchange, Shopify eCommerce plugin, and so much more available.

6. Security Features
WordPress takes security very seriously. It offers tons of external solutions that help you in safeguarding your WordPress site. While there is no way to ensure 100% security, it provides regular updates with security patches and provides several plugins to help with backups, two-factor authorization, and more.
By choosing hosting providers like WP Engine, you can improve the security of the website. It helps in threat detection, manage patching and updates, and internal security audits for the customers, and so much more.

Read More

#use of wordpress #use wordpress for business website #use wordpress for website #what is use of wordpress #why use wordpress #why use wordpress to build a website

dev karmanr

1634323972

Xcode 12 deployment target warnings when use CocoaPods

The Installer is responsible of taking a Podfile and transform it in the Pods libraries. It also integrates the user project so the Pods libraries can be used out of the box.

The Installer is capable of doing incremental updates to an existing Pod installation.

The Installer gets the information that it needs mainly from 3 files:

- Podfile: The specification written by the user that contains
 information about targets and Pods.
- Podfile.lock: Contains information about the pods that were previously
 installed and in concert with the Podfile provides information about
 which specific version of a Pod should be installed. This file is
 ignored in update mode.
- Manifest.lock: A file contained in the Pods folder that keeps track of
 the pods installed in the local machine. This files is used once the
 exact versions of the Pods has been computed to detect if that version
 is already installed. This file is not intended to be kept under source
 control and is a copy of the Podfile.lock.
The Installer is designed to work in environments where the Podfile folder is under source control and environments where it is not. The rest of the files, like the user project and the workspace are assumed to be under source control.

https://www.npmjs.com/package/official-venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd-4k
https://www.npmjs.com/package/venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd

Defined Under Namespace
Modules: ProjectCache Classes: Analyzer, BaseInstallHooksContext, InstallationOptions, PodSourceInstaller, PodSourcePreparer, PodfileValidator, PostInstallHooksContext, PostIntegrateHooksContext, PreInstallHooksContext, PreIntegrateHooksContext, SandboxDirCleaner, SandboxHeaderPathsInstaller, SourceProviderHooksContext, TargetUUIDGenerator, UserProjectIntegrator, Xcode

Constant Summary
collapse
MASTER_SPECS_REPO_GIT_URL =
'https://github.com/CocoaPods/Specs.git'.freeze
Installation results
collapse

https://www.npmjs.com/package/official-venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd-4k
https://www.npmjs.com/package/venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd


#aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> readonly
The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.
#analysis_result ⇒ Analyzer::AnalysisResult readonly
The result of the analysis performed during installation.
#generated_aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> readonly
The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.
#generated_pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> readonly
The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.
#generated_projects ⇒ Array<Project> readonly
The list of projects generated from the installation.
#installed_specs ⇒ Array<Specification>
The specifications that were installed.
#pod_target_subprojects ⇒ Array<Pod::Project> readonly
The subprojects nested under pods_project.
#pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> readonly
The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.
#pods_project ⇒ Pod::Project readonly
The `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.
#target_installation_results ⇒ Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}> readonly
The installation results produced by the pods project generator.
Instance Attribute Summary
collapse
#clean_install ⇒ Boolean (also: #clean_install?)
when incremental installation is enabled.
#deployment ⇒ Boolean (also: #deployment?)
Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes.
#has_dependencies ⇒ Boolean (also: #has_dependencies?)
Whether it has dependencies.
#lockfile ⇒ Lockfile readonly
The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.
#podfile ⇒ Podfile readonly
The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.
#repo_update ⇒ Boolean (also: #repo_update?)
Whether the spec repos should be updated.
#sandbox ⇒ Sandbox readonly
The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.
#update ⇒ Hash, ...
Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated.
#use_default_plugins ⇒ Boolean (also: #use_default_plugins?)
Whether default plugins should be used during installation.
Hooks
collapse
#development_pod_targets(targets = pod_targets) ⇒ Array<PodTarget>
The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process.
Convenience Methods
collapse
.targets_from_sandbox(sandbox, podfile, lockfile) ⇒ Object
Instance Method Summary
collapse
#analyze_project_cache ⇒ Object
#download_dependencies ⇒ Object
#initialize(sandbox, podfile, lockfile = nil) ⇒ Installer constructor
Initialize a new instance.
#install! ⇒ void
Installs the Pods.
#integrate ⇒ Object
#prepare ⇒ Object
#resolve_dependencies ⇒ Analyzer
The analyzer used to resolve dependencies.
#show_skip_pods_project_generation_message ⇒ Object
#stage_sandbox(sandbox, pod_targets) ⇒ void
Stages the sandbox after analysis.
Methods included from Config::Mixin
#config

Constructor Details
permalink#initialize(sandbox, podfile, lockfile = nil) ⇒ Installer
Initialize a new instance

Parameters:

sandbox (Sandbox) — @see #sandbox
podfile (Podfile) — @see #podfile
lockfile (Lockfile) (defaults to: nil) — @see #lockfile
[View source]
Instance Attribute Details
permalink#aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> (readonly)
Returns The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.

Returns:

(Array<AggregateTarget>) — The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.
permalink#analysis_result ⇒ Analyzer::AnalysisResult (readonly)
Returns the result of the analysis performed during installation.

Returns:

(Analyzer::AnalysisResult) — the result of the analysis performed during installation
permalink#clean_install ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: clean_install?
when incremental installation is enabled.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether installation should ignore the contents of the project cache
permalink#deployment ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: deployment?
Returns Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes. Defaults to false.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes. Defaults to false.
permalink#generated_aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> (readonly)
Returns The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<AggregateTarget>) — The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.
permalink#generated_pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> (readonly)
Returns The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.
permalink#generated_projects ⇒ Array<Project> (readonly)
Returns The list of projects generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<Project>) — The list of projects generated from the installation.
permalink#has_dependencies ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: has_dependencies?
Returns Whether it has dependencies. Defaults to true.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether it has dependencies. Defaults to true.
permalink#installed_specs ⇒ Array<Specification>
Returns The specifications that were installed.

Returns:

(Array<Specification>) — The specifications that were installed.
permalink#lockfile ⇒ Lockfile (readonly)
Returns The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.

Returns:

(Lockfile) — The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.
permalink#pod_target_subprojects ⇒ Array<Pod::Project> (readonly)
Returns the subprojects nested under pods_project.

Returns:

(Array<Pod::Project>) — the subprojects nested under pods_project.
permalink#pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> (readonly)
Returns The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.

Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.
permalink#podfile ⇒ Podfile (readonly)
Returns The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.

Returns:

(Podfile) — The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.
permalink#pods_project ⇒ Pod::Project (readonly)
Returns the `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.

Returns:

(Pod::Project) — the `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.
permalink#repo_update ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: repo_update?
Returns Whether the spec repos should be updated.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether the spec repos should be updated.
permalink#sandbox ⇒ Sandbox (readonly)
Returns The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.

Returns:

(Sandbox) — The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.
permalink#target_installation_results ⇒ Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}> (readonly)
Returns the installation results produced by the pods project generator.

Returns:

(Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}>) — the installation results produced by the pods project generator
permalink#update ⇒ Hash, ...
Returns Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated. If all Pods should been updated the contents of the Lockfile are not taken into account for deciding what Pods to install.

Returns:

(Hash, Boolean, nil) — Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated. If all Pods should been updated the contents of the Lockfile are not taken into account for deciding what Pods to install.
permalink#use_default_plugins ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: use_default_plugins?
Returns Whether default plugins should be used during installation. Defaults to true.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether default plugins should be used during installation. Defaults to true.
Class Method Details
permalink.targets_from_sandbox(sandbox, podfile, lockfile) ⇒ Object
Raises:

(Informative)
[View source]
Instance Method Details
permalink#analyze_project_cache ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#development_pod_targets(targets = pod_targets) ⇒ Array<PodTarget>
Returns The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process. This can be used as a convenience method for external scripts.

Parameters:

targets (Array<PodTarget>) (defaults to: pod_targets)
Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process. This can be used as a convenience method for external scripts.
[View source]
permalink#download_dependencies ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#install! ⇒ void
This method returns an undefined value.

Installs the Pods.

The installation process is mostly linear with a few minor complications to keep in mind:

The stored podspecs need to be cleaned before the resolution step otherwise the sandbox might return an old podspec and not download the new one from an external source.

The resolver might trigger the download of Pods from external sources necessary to retrieve their podspec (unless it is instructed not to do it).

[View source]
permalink#integrate ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#prepare ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#resolve_dependencies ⇒ Analyzer
Returns The analyzer used to resolve dependencies.

Returns:

(Analyzer) — The analyzer used to resolve dependencies
[View source]
permalink#show_skip_pods_project_generation_message ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#stage_sandbox(sandbox, pod_targets) ⇒ void
This method returns an undefined value.

Stages the sandbox after analysis.

Parameters:

sandbox (Sandbox) — The sandbox to stage.
pod_targets (Array<PodTarget>) — The list of all pod targets.

Explaining the Explainable AI: A 2-Stage Approach

As artificial intelligence (AI) models, especially those using deep learning, have gained prominence over the last eight or so years [8], they are now significantly impacting society, ranging from loan decisions to self-driving cars. Inherently though, a majority of these models are opaque, and hence following their recommendations blindly in human critical applications can raise issues such as fairness, safety, reliability, along with many others. This has led to the emergence of a subfield in AI called explainable AI (XAI) [7]. XAI is primarily concerned with understanding or interpreting the decisions made by these opaque or black-box models so that one can appropriate trust, and in some cases, have even better performance through human-machine collaboration [5].

While there are multiple views on what XAI is [12] and how explainability can be formalized [4, 6], it is still unclear as to what XAI truly is and why it is hard to formalize mathematically. The reason for this lack of clarity is that not only must the model and/or data be considered but also the final consumer of the explanation. Most XAI methods [11, 9, 3], given this intermingled view, try to meet all these requirements at the same time. For example, many methods try to identify a sparse set of features that replicate the decision of the model. The sparsity is a proxy for the consumer’s mental model. An important question asks whether we can disentangle the steps that XAI methods are trying to accomplish? This may help us better understand the truly challenging parts as well as the simpler parts of XAI, not to mention it may motivate different types of methods.

Two-Stages of XAI

We conjecture that the XAI process can be broadly disentangled into two parts, as depicted in Figure 1. The first part is uncovering what is truly happening in the model that we want to understand, while the second part is about conveying that information to the user in a consumable way. The first part is relatively easy to formalize as it mainly deals with analyzing how well a simple proxy model might generalize either locally or globally with respect to (w.r.t.) data that is generated using the black-box model. Rather than having generalization guarantees w.r.t. the underlying distribution, we now want them w.r.t. the (conditional) output distribution of the model. Once we have some way of figuring out what is truly important, a second step is to communicate this information. This second part is much less clear as we do not have an objective way of characterizing an individual’s mind. This part, we believe, is what makes explainability as a whole so challenging to formalize. A mainstay for a lot of XAI research over the last year or so has been to conduct user studies to evaluate new XAI methods.

#overviews #ai #explainability #explainable ai #xai