10 Cybersecurity Tips For Entrepreneur

10 Cybersecurity Tips For Entrepreneur

10 Cybersecurity Tips For Entrepreneur - Protect information, computers, and networks from cyber attacks. Provide firewall security for your Internet connection. Create a mobile device action plan...

Being an entrepreneur, one has to make sure that almost everything works perfectly. There are many aspects of running a business and an entrepreneur is expected to do good on all the parameters of all the aspects by either doing things himself or by managing the people who do it. In the modern world, a business needs to have an online presence even if its product/service has nothing to do with the internet. This presence on the internet brings a problem of maintaining the security of the things that are online.

Here are the 10 most important things that an entrepreneur should do to keep the online systems up, secure and running:

1. Improving physical security to prevent unauthorized access to the confidential data by an attacker getting physical access to a device:

Ensuring security from attacks requiring physical access to the devices will lower the risk of getting hacked to a great extent because of the fact that these kind of attacks are most probable among all and are easy to carry out, as these do not require really good technical knowledge. Improving physical security involves:

  • Keeping external computers(like the one used on the reception) on a separate network than that of the internal computers.
  • Keeping routers, switches and other connected devices well encased and locked.
  • Using strong passwords on the systems and logging out of the accounts whenever leaving the system unattended.

2. Encrypting important data:

Data stored on internal hard drives/SSDs as well as removable media should be encrypted to prevent access to its data due to theft or loss of the media or the device containing the internal hard drive/SSD. Backup files should also be encrypted to prevent an attacker from stealing it and restoring it somewhere else.

3. Securing the production network against external attacks:

If your internal network faces the internet, it is crucial to protect it from the malicious traffic that may come from the internet by some attacker. Firewalls can be used to protect your internal network. There are multiple vendors providing many types of firewalls.

Firewalls mainly fall into two categories i.e. stateful and stateless. The correct type can be chosen by properly analyzing the type of traffic the network will carry and expected malicious traffic.

4. Using up to date software:

Software components that are used in the development and deployment of products are as potentially vulnerable to various attacks as end-user software. Using outdated versions with known security problems can turn out to be a big problem and cost a lot to the company in terms of money and reputation.

Although there are measures to prevent attackers from identifying the version of software components being used. But there are ways to circumvent these and new ways are being discovered by attackers every day. These updates are usually free and easy to install. A better way is to create a policy on update availability checking and implementation frequency.

5. Getting Security Audits done regularly:

Assessing the security of your product gives you an insight into what you can do to strengthen its security. A security audit done by experts helps a lot in identifying weak areas and exposed attack surfaces. This can either be outsourced to the firms that provide security services or a group of experts can be hired and classified into a “red team” and a “blue team“.

The job of the blue team is preventive maintenance and secure product development. The red team, on the other hand, comes into the picture after the product is ready. The red team performs what is called a “penetration test“, where the red teamers try to hack the product in the same way an attacker might do. This helps to patch the vulnerabilities before hackers can find and exploit them.

6. Ensuring proper and secure backup of sensitive and useful data:

Even after all the precautions being taken properly, cyber attacks may be successful against your organization. Frequent backups should be performed to prevent data loss. Backup files should be password protected and/or encrypted. In the case of cloud backup, the files should be protected with a strong password.

7. Starting a crowdsourced security testing program or a bug bounty program:

A bug bounty program is a program that lets the freelancer white hat hackers try and find security vulnerabilities in your online assets connected to the internet. Much like the internal red team. The main benefit is that the assets are tested by hackers from a variety of backgrounds and skillset and there is no payment for testing. A payment or reward is provided only when a potential security issue is discovered. This makes the process of bug bounty highly result oriented and efficient for companies as well as researchers.

The reason that bug bounty programs being result driven is good for researchers is that it helps them stand out of the crowd based on their skills.

8. Employee training:

An employee is the weakest link in the security of your system, why? because you may have the world-class security to your online assets but if one of your employees can be socially engineered into sharing something confidential then all of it will prove to be of no use. This is why training employees to make them aware of potential security problems related to their work and how to avoid them is important.

A crucial part of this training should be to teach employees, how to spot social engineering attempts and do not share confidential information over the phone and other insecure channels.

9. Securing the WiFi:

Securing the WiFi is important considering the fact that a host connected to your network can sniff all the traffic originating from or destined to any other host on the network. There are few things which should be done to make sure that wireless LANs are secure enough.

  • Use WPA2+(WPA2, WPA3) encryption while configuring your wifi AP. Though these are not very secure after the discovery of vulnerabilities like Krack and Dragonblood, these are still much better than other older standards.
  • Do not leave any AP as unencrypted(open) and instruct the employees to not connect to any open or untrusted WiFi
  • network.
  • Disable SSID broadcast and enable MAC filtering to further harden the security fence of the AP.

10. Implying other best Security Practices:

Apart from the things mentioned earlier, there are many more things apart from these that can be implemented to provide enhanced security. These are relatively new techniques that have emerged recently. Some of them are:

  • 2FA(2 Factor Authentication)
  • Location Based login.
  • Strict password complexity policy.
  • Implementing rate limiting on login forms to prevent brute-force attacks.
  • Using Captcha to prevent scripts/bots from creating rogue requests.


Originally published  at geeksforgeeks.org

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How to build a secure Grails 4 Application using Spring Security Core

How to build a secure Grails 4 Application using Spring Security Core

In this Grails 4 tutorial, we will show you how to build a secure Grails 4 application using Spring Security Core Plugin. We will add the login and register function to the Grails 4 application.

In this Grails 4 tutorial, we will show you how to build a secure Grails 4 application using Spring Security Core Plugin. We will add the login and register function to the Grails 4 application. The purpose of using the Spring Security plugin has simplified the integration of Spring Security Java (we have written this tutorial). The usage of this Grails 4 Spring Security plugin similar to Grails 2 or 3, but there's a lot of updates on the Spring Security code and its dependencies to match the compatibilities.

Table of Contents:

The flow of this tutorial is very simple. We have a secure Product list that only accessible to the authorized user with ROLE_USER and Product CRUD for the user with ROLE_ADMIN. Any access to this Product resource will be redirected to the Login Page as default (if no authorized user). In the login page, there will be a link to the registration page that will register a new user.

The following tools, frameworks, libraries, and dependencies are required for this tutorial:

  1. JDK 8
  2. Grails 4
  3. Grails Spring Security Core Plugin
  4. Terminal or Command Line
  5. Text Editor or IDE

Before starting the main steps, make sure you have downloaded and installed the latest Grails 4. In Mac, we are using the SDKMan. For that, type this command in the Terminal to install SDKMan.

curl -s https://get.sdkman.io | bash

Follow all instructions that showed up during installation. Next, open the new Terminal window or tab then type this command.

source "$HOME/.sdkman/bin/sdkman-init.sh"

Now, you can install Grails 4 using SDKMan.

sdk install grails 4.0.1

Set that new Grails 4 as default. To check the Grails version, type this command.

grails -version
| Grails Version: 4.0.1
| JVM Version: 1.8.0_92
Create Grails 4 Application

Same as previous Grails version, to create a new Grails application, simply type this command.

grails create-app com.djamware.gadgethouse

That command will create a new Grails 4 application with the name "gadgethouse" with the package name "com.djamware". Next, go to the newly created project folder then enter the Grails 4 interactive console.

cd ./gadgethouse
grails

In the Grails interactive console, type this command to run this Grails application for the first time.

grails> run-app

Here's the new Grails 4 look like.

Install Grails Spring Security Core Plugin

Now, we will install and configure Grails Spring Security Core Plugin. For the database, we keep H2 in-memory database (You can change to other relational database configuration). To install the Grails Spring Security Core Plugin, open and edit build.gradle then add this dependency in dependencies array.

compile "org.grails.plugins:spring-security-core:4.0.0.RC2"

Next, stop the running Grails application using this command in the Grails interactive console.

stop-app

Compile the Grails application, to install the Spring Security Core plugin.

compile
Create User, Role, and Product Domain Class

We will use the Grails s2-quickstart command to create User and Role domain class for authentication. Type this command in Grails interactive console.

s2-quickstart com.djamware User Role

That command will create User and Role domain class with the package name "com.djamware". Next, open and edit grails-app/domain/com/djamware/Role.groovy to add default field after the bracket closing when this domain calls.

String toString() {
  authority
}

Next, create a domain class using regular Grails command for Product.

create-domain-class com.djamware.Product

Next, we need to create an additional field in the user domain class. For that, open and edit grails-app/domain/com/djamware/User.groovy then add a fullName field after the password field.

String fullname

Also, add a constraint for that field.

static constraints = {
    password nullable: false, blank: false, password: true
    username nullable: false, blank: false, unique: true
    fullname nullable: false, blank: false
}

Next, open and edit grails-app/domain/com/djamware/Product.groovy then replace that domain class with these Groovy codes.

package com.djamware

class Product {

    String prodCode
    String prodName
    String prodModel
    String prodDesc
    String prodImageUrl
    String prodPrice

    static constraints = {
        prodCode nullable: false, blank: false
        prodName nullable: false, blank: false
        prodModel nullable: false, blank: false
        prodDesc nullable: false, blank: false
        prodImageUrl nullable: true
        prodPrice nullable: false, blank: false
    }

    String toString() {
        prodName
    }
}
Create CustomUserDetailsService

Because we have added a field in the previous User domain class, we need to create a custom UserDetails. Create a new Groovy file src/main/groovy/com/djamware/CustomUserDetails.groovy then add these lines of Groovy codes that add full name field to the Grails UserDetails.

package com.djamware

import grails.plugin.springsecurity.userdetails.GrailsUser
import org.springframework.security.core.GrantedAuthority

class CustomUserDetails extends GrailsUser {

   final String fullname

   CustomUserDetails(String username, String password, boolean enabled,
                 boolean accountNonExpired, boolean credentialsNonExpired,
                 boolean accountNonLocked,
                 Collection<GrantedAuthority> authorities,
                 long id, String fullname) {
      super(username, password, enabled, accountNonExpired,
            credentialsNonExpired, accountNonLocked, authorities, id)

      this.fullname = fullname
   }
}

Next, type this command in the Grails interactive console to create a new Grails service.

grails> create-service com.djamware.CustomUserDetails

Open that file then replace all Groovy codes with these codes.

package com.djamware

import grails.plugin.springsecurity.SpringSecurityUtils
import grails.plugin.springsecurity.userdetails.GrailsUserDetailsService
import grails.plugin.springsecurity.userdetails.NoStackUsernameNotFoundException
import grails.gorm.transactions.Transactional
import org.springframework.security.core.authority.SimpleGrantedAuthority
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UserDetails
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UsernameNotFoundException

class CustomUserDetailsService implements GrailsUserDetailsService {

   /**
    * Some Spring Security classes (e.g. RoleHierarchyVoter) expect at least
    * one role, so we give a user with no granted roles this one which gets
    * past that restriction but doesn't grant anything.
    */
   static final List NO_ROLES = [new SimpleGrantedAuthority(SpringSecurityUtils.NO_ROLE)]

   UserDetails loadUserByUsername(String username, boolean loadRoles)
         throws UsernameNotFoundException {
      return loadUserByUsername(username)
   }

   @Transactional(readOnly=true, noRollbackFor=[IllegalArgumentException, UsernameNotFoundException])
   UserDetails loadUserByUsername(String username) throws UsernameNotFoundException {

      User user = User.findByUsername(username)
      if (!user) throw new NoStackUsernameNotFoundException()

      def roles = user.authorities

      // or if you are using role groups:
      // def roles = user.authorities.collect { it.authorities }.flatten().unique()

      def authorities = roles.collect {
         new SimpleGrantedAuthority(it.authority)
      }

      return new CustomUserDetails(user.username, user.password, user.enabled,
            !user.accountExpired, !user.passwordExpired,
            !user.accountLocked, authorities ?: NO_ROLES, user.id,
            user.fullname)
   }
}

Next, register that new CustomUserDetailsService in the grails-app/conf/spring/resources.groovy.

import com.djamware.UserPasswordEncoderListener
import com.djamware.CustomUserDetailsService
// Place your Spring DSL code here
beans = {
    userPasswordEncoderListener(UserPasswordEncoderListener)
    userDetailsService(CustomUserDetailsService)
}
Override Login Auth View

We will customize the login page to make UI better and add a link to the Register page. For that, create a login folder under views then create an auth.gsp file in that folder. Open and edit grails-app/views/login/auth.gsp then add these lines of GSP HTML tags.

<html>
<head>
    <meta name="layout" content="${gspLayout ?: 'main'}"/>
    <title><g:message code='springSecurity.login.title'/></title>
</head>

<body>
    <div class="row">
      <div class="col-sm-9 col-md-7 col-lg-5 mx-auto">
        <div class="card card-signin my-5">
          <div class="card-body">
            <h5 class="card-title text-center">Please Login</h5>
            <g:if test='${flash.message}'>
                <div class="alert alert-danger" role="alert">${flash.message}</div>
            </g:if>
            <form class="form-signin" action="${postUrl ?: '/login/authenticate'}" method="POST" id="loginForm" autocomplete="off">
              <div class="form-group">
                  <label for="username">Username</label>
                <input type="text" class="form-control" name="${usernameParameter ?: 'username'}" id="username" autocapitalize="none"/>
              </div>

              <div class="form-group">
                  <label for="password">Password</label>
                <input type="password" class="form-control" name="${passwordParameter ?: 'password'}" id="password"/>
                <i id="passwordToggler" title="toggle password display" onclick="passwordDisplayToggle()">&#128065;</i>
              </div>

              <div class="form-group form-check">
                  <label class="form-check-label">
                      <input type="checkbox" class="form-check-input" name="${rememberMeParameter ?: 'remember-me'}" id="remember_me" <g:if test='${hasCookie}'>checked="checked"</g:if>/> Remember me
                </label>
              </div>
              <button id="submit" class="btn btn-lg btn-primary btn-block text-uppercase" type="submit">Sign in</button>
              <hr class="my-4">
              <p>Don't have an account? <g:link controller="register">Register</g:link></p>
            </form>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function(event) {
            document.forms['loginForm'].elements['username'].focus();
        });
        function passwordDisplayToggle() {
            var toggleEl = document.getElementById("passwordToggler");
            var eyeIcon = '\u{1F441}';
            var xIcon = '\u{2715}';
            var passEl = document.getElementById("password");
            if (passEl.type === "password") {
                toggleEl.innerHTML = xIcon;
                passEl.type = "text";
            } else {
                toggleEl.innerHTML = eyeIcon;
                passEl.type = "password";
            }
        }
    </script>
</body>
</html>

Next, we will make this login page as default or homepage when the application opens in the browser. For that, open and edit grails-app/controllers/UrlMappings.groovy then replace this line.

"/"(view: "index")

With this line.

"/"(controller:'login', action:'auth')
Add User Info and Logout to the Navbar

Now, we have to implement POST logout to the Navbar. This logout button active when the user logged in successfully along with user info. For that, modify grails-app/views/layout/main.gsp then replace all GSP HTML tags with these.

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en" class="no-js">
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge"/>
    <title>
        <g:layoutTitle default="Grails"/>
    </title>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1"/>
    <asset:link rel="icon" href="favicon.ico" type="image/x-ico"/>

    <asset:stylesheet src="application.css"/>

    <g:layoutHead/>
</head>

<body>

<nav class="navbar navbar-expand-lg navbar-dark navbar-static-top" role="navigation">
    <a class="navbar-brand" href="/#"><asset:image src="grails.svg" alt="Grails Logo"/></a>
    <button class="navbar-toggler" type="button" data-toggle="collapse" data-target="#navbarContent" aria-controls="navbarContent" aria-expanded="false" aria-label="Toggle navigation">
        <span class="navbar-toggler-icon"></span>
    </button>

    <div class="collapse navbar-collapse" aria-expanded="false" style="height: 0.8px;" id="navbarContent">
        <ul class="nav navbar-nav ml-auto">
            <g:pageProperty name="page.nav"/>
            <sec:ifLoggedIn>
              <li class="nav-item dropdown">
                  <a class="nav-link dropdown-toggle" href="#" id="navbardrop" data-toggle="dropdown">
                    <sec:loggedInUserInfo field='fullname'/>
                  </a>
                  <div class="dropdown-menu navbar-dark">
                    <g:form controller="logout">
                      <g:submitButton class="dropdown-item navbar-dark color-light" name="Submit" value="Logout" style="color:gray" />
                    </g:form>
                  </div>
              </li>
            </sec:ifLoggedIn>
        </ul>
    </div>

</nav>

<div class="container">
    <g:layoutBody/>
</div>

<div class="footer row" role="contentinfo">
    <div class="col">
        <a href="http://guides.grails.org" target="_blank">
            <asset:image src="advancedgrails.svg" alt="Grails Guides" class="float-left"/>
        </a>
        <strong class="centered"><a href="http://guides.grails.org" target="_blank">Grails Guides</a></strong>
        <p>Building your first Grails app? Looking to add security, or create a Single-Page-App? Check out the <a href="http://guides.grails.org" target="_blank">Grails Guides</a> for step-by-step tutorials.</p>

    </div>
    <div class="col">
        <a href="http://docs.grails.org" target="_blank">
            <asset:image src="documentation.svg" alt="Grails Documentation" class="float-left"/>
        </a>
        <strong class="centered"><a href="http://docs.grails.org" target="_blank">Documentation</a></strong>
        <p>Ready to dig in? You can find in-depth documentation for all the features of Grails in the <a href="http://docs.grails.org" target="_blank">User Guide</a>.</p>

    </div>

    <div class="col">
        <a href="https://grails-slack.cfapps.io" target="_blank">
            <asset:image src="slack.svg" alt="Grails Slack" class="float-left"/>
        </a>
        <strong class="centered"><a href="https://grails-slack.cfapps.io" target="_blank">Join the Community</a></strong>
        <p>Get feedback and share your experience with other Grails developers in the community <a href="https://grails-slack.cfapps.io" target="_blank">Slack channel</a>.</p>
    </div>
</div>

<div id="spinner" class="spinner" style="display:none;">
    <g:message code="spinner.alt" default="Loading&hellip;"/>
</div>

<asset:javascript src="application.js"/>

</body>
</html>

As you see, there are built in Grails Spring Security TagLib sec:ifLoggedIn and <sec:loggedInUserInfo field='fullname'/>. The <sec:loggedInUserInfo field='fullname'/> only working when you implementing CustomUserDetailsService.

Create Register Controller and View

Back to the Grails interactive console to create a controller for the Register page.

grails> create-controller com.djamware.Register

Open and edit that Groovy file then replace all Groovy codes with these codes that have 2 methods of Register landing page and register action.

package com.djamware

import grails.validation.ValidationException
import grails.gorm.transactions.Transactional
import grails.plugin.springsecurity.annotation.Secured
import com.djamware.User
import com.djamware.Role
import com.djamware.UserRole

@Transactional
@Secured('permitAll')
class RegisterController {

    static allowedMethods = [register: "POST"]

    def index() { }

    def register() {
        if(!params.password.equals(params.repassword)) {
            flash.message = "Password and Re-Password not match"
            redirect action: "index"
            return
        } else {
            try {
                def user = User.findByUsername(params.username)?: new User(username: params.username, password: params.password, fullname: params.fullname).save()
                def role = Role.get(params.role.id)
                if(user && role) {
                    UserRole.create user, role

                    UserRole.withSession {
                      it.flush()
                      it.clear()
                    }

                    flash.message = "You have registered successfully. Please login."
                    redirect controller: "login", action: "auth"
                } else {
                    flash.message = "Register failed"
                    render view: "index"
                    return
                }
            } catch (ValidationException e) {
                flash.message = "Register Failed"
                redirect action: "index"
                return
            }
        }
    }
}

Next, add the index.gsp inside grails-app/views/register/. Open and edit that file then add these lines of GSP HTML tags.

<html>
<head>
    <meta name="layout" content="${gspLayout ?: 'main'}"/>
    <title>Register</title>
</head>

<body>
    <div class="row">
    <div class="col-sm-9 col-md-7 col-lg-5 mx-auto">
      <div class="card card-signin my-5">
        <div class="card-body">
          <h5 class="card-title text-center">Register Here</h5>
                    <g:if test='${flash.message}'>
                        <div class="alert alert-danger" role="alert">${flash.message}</div>
                    </g:if>
              <form class="form-signin" action="register" method="POST" id="loginForm" autocomplete="off">
                      <div class="form-group">
                          <label for="role">Role</label>
              <g:select class="form-control" name="role.id"
                    from="${com.djamware.Role.list()}"
                    optionKey="id" />
                </div>

            <div class="form-group">
                    <label for="username">Username</label>
              <input type="text" placeholder="Your username" class="form-control" name="username" id="username" autocapitalize="none"/>
            </div>

            <div class="form-group">
                          <label for="password">Password</label>
              <input type="password" placeholder="Your password" class="form-control" name="password" id="password"/>
            </div>

            <div class="form-group">
                          <label for="password">Re-Enter Password</label>
              <input type="password" placeholder="Re-enter password" class="form-control" name="repassword" id="repassword"/>
            </div>

                      <div class="form-group">
                          <label for="username">Full Name</label>
              <input type="text" placeholder="Your full name" class="form-control" name="fullname" id="fullname" autocapitalize="none"/>
            </div>

            <button id="submit" class="btn btn-lg btn-primary btn-block text-uppercase" type="submit">Register</button>
            <hr class="my-4">
            <p>Already have an account? <g:link controller="login" action="auth">Login</g:link></p>
          </form>
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function(event) {
            document.forms['loginForm'].elements['username'].focus();
        });
    </script>
</body>
</html>
Create the Secure Product CRUD Scaffolding

Now, we will make Product CRUD scaffolding and make them secured and accessible to ROLE_USER and ROLE_ADMIN. To create CRUD scaffolding, simply run this command inside Grails interactive console.

grails>generate-all com.djamware.Product

That command will generate controller, service, and view for a Product domain class. Next, open and edit grails-app/controllers/ProductController.groovy then add the Secure annotation like these.

package com.djamware

import grails.validation.ValidationException
import static org.springframework.http.HttpStatus.*
import grails.plugin.springsecurity.annotation.Secured

class ProductController {

    ProductService productService

    static allowedMethods = [save: "POST", update: "PUT", delete: "DELETE"]

    @Secured(['ROLE_ADMIN', 'ROLE_USER'])
    def index(Integer max) {
        params.max = Math.min(max ?: 10, 100)
        respond productService.list(params), model:[productCount: productService.count()]
    }

    @Secured(['ROLE_ADMIN', 'ROLE_USER'])
    def show(Long id) {
        respond productService.get(id)
    }

    @Secured('ROLE_ADMIN')
    def create() {
        respond new Product(params)
    }

    @Secured('ROLE_ADMIN')
    def save(Product product) {
        if (product == null) {
            notFound()
            return
        }

        try {
            productService.save(product)
        } catch (ValidationException e) {
            respond product.errors, view:'create'
            return
        }

        request.withFormat {
            form multipartForm {
                flash.message = message(code: 'default.created.message', args: [message(code: 'product.label', default: 'Product'), product.id])
                redirect product
            }
            '*' { respond product, [status: CREATED] }
        }
    }

    @Secured('ROLE_ADMIN')
    def edit(Long id) {
        respond productService.get(id)
    }

    @Secured('ROLE_ADMIN')
    def update(Product product) {
        if (product == null) {
            notFound()
            return
        }

        try {
            productService.save(product)
        } catch (ValidationException e) {
            respond product.errors, view:'edit'
            return
        }

        request.withFormat {
            form multipartForm {
                flash.message = message(code: 'default.updated.message', args: [message(code: 'product.label', default: 'Product'), product.id])
                redirect product
            }
            '*'{ respond product, [status: OK] }
        }
    }

    @Secured('ROLE_ADMIN')
    def delete(Long id) {
        if (id == null) {
            notFound()
            return
        }

        productService.delete(id)

        request.withFormat {
            form multipartForm {
                flash.message = message(code: 'default.deleted.message', args: [message(code: 'product.label', default: 'Product'), id])
                redirect action:"index", method:"GET"
            }
            '*'{ render status: NO_CONTENT }
        }
    }

    protected void notFound() {
        request.withFormat {
            form multipartForm {
                flash.message = message(code: 'default.not.found.message', args: [message(code: 'product.label', default: 'Product'), params.id])
                redirect action: "index", method: "GET"
            }
            '*'{ render status: NOT_FOUND }
        }
    }
}

Next, we will make Product controller as a default landing page after succeful login. For that, open and edit grails-app/conf/application.groovy then add this configuration.

grails.plugin.springsecurity.successHandler.defaultTargetUrl = '/product'
Run and Test Grails 4 Spring Security Core

Now, we will run and test the Grails 4 Spring Security Core application. In the Grails interactive console run this command.

grails>run-app

Open the browser then go to http://localhost:8080 and you will see this page.




That it's, the Grails 4 Tutorial: Spring Security Core Login Example. You can find the full working source code in our GitHub.

Thanks!

Securing RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB

Securing RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB

A comprehensive step by step tutorial on securing or authentication RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB

A comprehensive step by step tutorial on securing or authentication RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB. Previously, we have shown you how to securing Spring Boot, MVC and MongoDB web application. In this tutorial, the secure endpoint will restrict the access from an unauthorized request. Every request to secure endpoint should bring authorization token with it. Of course, there will be an endpoint for login which will get authorization token after successful login.

Table of Contents:

The following software, tools, and frameworks are required for this tutorial:

We assume that you already installed all required software, tools, and frameworks. So, we will not cover how to install that software, tools, and frameworks.

1. Generate a New Spring Boot Gradle Project

To create or generate a new Spring Boot Application or Project, simply go to Spring Initializer. Fill all required fields as below then click on Generate Project button.

The project will automatically be downloaded as a Zip file. Next, extract the zipped project to your java projects folder. On the project folder root, you will find build.gradle file for register dependencies, initially it looks like this.

buildscript {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;ext {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;springBootVersion = '2.1.2.RELEASE'
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;repositories {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;mavenCentral()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;dependencies {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:${springBootVersion}")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'org.springframework.boot'
apply plugin: 'io.spring.dependency-management'

group = 'com.djamware'
version = '0.0.1-SNAPSHOT'
sourceCompatibility = '1.8'

repositories {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;implementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-data-mongodb'
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;implementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-security'
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;implementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web'
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;testImplementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-test'
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;testImplementation 'org.springframework.security:spring-security-test'
}

Now, you can work with the source code of this Spring Boot Project using your own IDE or Text Editor. We are using Spring Tool Suite (STS). In STS, import the extracted zipped file as Existing Gradle Project.

Next, we have to add the JWT library to the build.gradle as the dependency. Open and edit build.gradle then add this line to dependencies after other implementation.

implementation 'io.jsonwebtoken:jjwt:0.9.1'

Next, compile the Gradle Project by type this command from Terminal or CMD.

./gradlew compile

Or you can compile directly from STS by right-clicking the project name then choose Gradle -> Refresh Gradle Project. Next, open and edit src/main/resources/application.properties then add these lines.

spring.data.mongodb.database=springmongodb
spring.data.mongodb.host=localhost
spring.data.mongodb.port=27017

2. Create Product, User and Role Model or Entity Classes

We will be creating all required models or entities for products, user and role. In STS, right-click the project name -> New -> Class. Fill the package with com.djamware.SecurityRest.models, the name with Product, and leave other fields and checkbox as default then click Finish Button.

Next, open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/models/Product.java then add this annotation above the class name that will point to MongoDB collection.

@Document(collection = "products")

Inside Product class, add these variables.

@Id
String id;
String prodName;
String prodDesc;
Double prodPrice;
String prodImage;

Add constructors after the variable or fields.

public Product() {
}

public Product(String prodName, String prodDesc, Double prodPrice, String prodImage) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;super();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.prodName = prodName;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.prodDesc = prodDesc;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.prodPrice = prodPrice;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.prodImage = prodImage;
}

Generate or create Getter and Setter for each field.

public String getId() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return id;
}

public void setId(String id) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.id = id;
}

public String getProdName() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return prodName;
}

public void setProdName(String prodName) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.prodName = prodName;
}

public String getProdDesc() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return prodDesc;
}

public void setProdDesc(String prodDesc) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.prodDesc = prodDesc;
}

public Double getProdPrice() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return prodPrice;
}

public void setProdPrice(Double prodPrice) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.prodPrice = prodPrice;
}

public String getProdImage() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return prodImage;
}

public void setProdImage(String prodImage) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.prodImage = prodImage;
}

Using STS you can organize imports automatically from the menu Source -> Organize Imports then you can see the imports after the package name.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.models;

import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.Document;

You can do the same way as the above step for User and Role class. Here’s the User class looks like.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.models;

import java.util.Set;

import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.IndexDirection;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.Indexed;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.DBRef;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.Document;

@Document(collection = "users")
public class User {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Id
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private String id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Indexed(unique = true, direction = IndexDirection.DESCENDING, dropDups = true)
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private String email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private String password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private String fullname;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private boolean enabled;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@DBRef
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private Set<Role> roles;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getId() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setId(String id) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.id = id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getEmail() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setEmail(String email) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.email = email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getPassword() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setPassword(String password) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.password = password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getFullname() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return fullname;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setFullname(String fullname) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.fullname = fullname;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public boolean isEnabled() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return enabled;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setEnabled(boolean enabled) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.enabled = enabled;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public Set<Role> getRoles() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return roles;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setRoles(Set<Role> roles) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.roles = roles;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

}

And the Role class will be like this.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.models;

import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.IndexDirection;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.Indexed;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.Document;

@Document(collection = "roles")
public class Role {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Id
&nbsp; &nbsp; private String id;
&nbsp; &nbsp; @Indexed(unique = true, direction = IndexDirection.DESCENDING, dropDups = true)

&nbsp; &nbsp; private String role;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getId() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setId(String id) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.id = id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getRole() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return role;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setRole(String role) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.role = role;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

}

3. Create Product, User and Role Repository Interfaces

Next steps to create Product, User, and Role Repository Interfaces. From the STS, right-click the project name -> New -> Interface then fill all required fields and checkboxes as below before click Finish button.

Next, open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/repositories/ProductRepository.java then add extends to MongoDB CRUD Repository.

public interface ProductRepository extends CrudRepository<Product, String> {

}

Inside the class name add this method.

@Override
void delete(Product deleted);

Organize all required imports.

import org.springframework.data.repository.CrudRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Product;

The same way can be applied to User and Role repositories. So, the User Repository Interface will look like this.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories;

import org.springframework.data.mongodb.repository.MongoRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.User;

public interface UserRepository extends MongoRepository<User, String> {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;User findByEmail(String email);
}

And the Role Repository Interface will look like this.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories;

import org.springframework.data.mongodb.repository.MongoRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Role;

public interface RoleRepository extends MongoRepository<Role, String> {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Role findByRole(String role);
}

4. Create a Custom User Details Service

To implements authentication using existing User and Role from MongoDB, we have to create a custom user details service. From the STS, right-click the project name -> New -> Class File then fill all required fields and checkboxes as below before clicking the finish button.

Next, open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/services/CustomUserDetailsService.java then give an annotation above the class name and implement the Spring Security User Details Service.

@Service
public class CustomUserDetailsService implements UserDetailsService {
}

Next, inject all required beans at the first line of the class bracket.

@Autowired
private UserRepository userRepository;

@Autowired
private RoleRepository roleRepository;

@Autowired
private PasswordEncoder bCryptPasswordEncoder;

Add a method to find a user by email field.

public User findUserByEmail(String email) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return userRepository.findByEmail(email);
}

Add a method to save a new user.

public void saveUser(User user) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; user.setPassword(bCryptPasswordEncoder.encode(user.getPassword()));
&nbsp; &nbsp; user.setEnabled(true);
&nbsp; &nbsp; Role userRole = roleRepository.findByRole("ADMIN");
&nbsp; &nbsp; user.setRoles(new HashSet<>(Arrays.asList(userRole)));
&nbsp; &nbsp; userRepository.save(user);
}

Override the Spring Security User Details to load User by email.

@Override
public UserDetails loadUserByUsername(String email) throws UsernameNotFoundException {

&nbsp; &nbsp; User user = userRepository.findByEmail(email);
&nbsp; &nbsp; if(user != null) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; List<GrantedAuthority> authorities = getUserAuthority(user.getRoles());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return buildUserForAuthentication(user, authorities);
&nbsp; &nbsp; } else {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; throw new UsernameNotFoundException("username not found");
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Add a method to get a set of Roles that related to a user.

private List<GrantedAuthority> getUserAuthority(Set<Role> userRoles) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; Set<GrantedAuthority> roles = new HashSet<>();
&nbsp; &nbsp; userRoles.forEach((role) -> {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; roles.add(new SimpleGrantedAuthority(role.getRole()));
&nbsp; &nbsp; });

&nbsp; &nbsp; List<GrantedAuthority> grantedAuthorities = new ArrayList<>(roles);
&nbsp; &nbsp; return grantedAuthorities;
}

Add a method for authentication purpose.

private UserDetails buildUserForAuthentication(User user, List<GrantedAuthority> authorities) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return new org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.User(user.getEmail(), user.getPassword(), authorities);
}

5. Configure Spring Boot Security Rest

Now, the main purpose of this tutorial is configuring Spring Security Rest. First, we have to create a bean for JWT token generation and validation. Right-click the project name -> New -> Class File. Fill the package name as com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs and the Class name as JwtTokenProvider then click the Finish button. Next, open and edit that newly created class file then give it an annotation above the class name.

@Component
public class JwtTokenProvider {
}

Add variables and injected bean inside the class bracket at the top lines.

@Value("${security.jwt.token.secret-key:secret}")
private String secretKey = "secret";

@Value("${security.jwt.token.expire-length:3600000}")
private long validityInMilliseconds = 3600000; // 1h

@Autowired
private CustomUserDetailsService userDetailsService;

Add a method for initialization.

@PostConstruct
protected void init() {
&nbsp; &nbsp; secretKey = Base64.getEncoder().encodeToString(secretKey.getBytes());
}

Add a method to create a JWT token.

public String createToken(String username, Set<Role> set) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; Claims claims = Jwts.claims().setSubject(username);
&nbsp; &nbsp; claims.put("roles", set);
&nbsp; &nbsp; Date now = new Date();
&nbsp; &nbsp; Date validity = new Date(now.getTime() + validityInMilliseconds);
&nbsp; &nbsp; return Jwts.builder()//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .setClaims(claims)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .setIssuedAt(now)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .setExpiration(validity)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .signWith(SignatureAlgorithm.HS256, secretKey)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .compact();
}

Add a method to load User by username.

public Authentication getAuthentication(String token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; UserDetails userDetails = this.userDetailsService.loadUserByUsername(getUsername(token));
&nbsp; &nbsp; return new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(userDetails, "", userDetails.getAuthorities());
}

Add a method to get the username by JWT token.

public String getUsername(String token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return Jwts.parser().setSigningKey(secretKey).parseClaimsJws(token).getBody().getSubject();
}

Add a method to resolve JWT token from request headers of Authorization that has a Bearer prefix.

public String resolveToken(HttpServletRequest req) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; String bearerToken = req.getHeader("Authorization");
&nbsp; &nbsp; if (bearerToken != null && bearerToken.startsWith("Bearer ")) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return bearerToken.substring(7, bearerToken.length());
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; return null;
}

Add a method to validate a JWT token.

public boolean validateToken(String token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; try {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Jws<Claims> claims = Jwts.parser().setSigningKey(secretKey).parseClaimsJws(token);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (claims.getBody().getExpiration().before(new Date())) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return false;
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return true;
&nbsp; &nbsp; } catch (JwtException | IllegalArgumentException e) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; throw new JwtException("Expired or invalid JWT token");
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Finally, organize imports like below.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs;

import java.util.Base64;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.Set;

import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Value;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken;
import org.springframework.security.core.Authentication;
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UserDetails;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Role;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.services.CustomUserDetailsService;

import io.jsonwebtoken.Claims;
import io.jsonwebtoken.Jws;
import io.jsonwebtoken.JwtException;
import io.jsonwebtoken.Jwts;
import io.jsonwebtoken.SignatureAlgorithm;

Next, create a JWT filter class with the name JwtTokenFilter in configs package that extends Spring GenericFilterBean. Replace all Java codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs;

import java.io.IOException;

import javax.servlet.FilterChain;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.ServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.ServletResponse;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;

import org.springframework.security.core.Authentication;
import org.springframework.security.core.context.SecurityContextHolder;
import org.springframework.web.filter.GenericFilterBean;

public class JwtTokenFilter extends GenericFilterBean {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

&nbsp; &nbsp; public JwtTokenFilter(JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; this.jwtTokenProvider = jwtTokenProvider;
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @Override
&nbsp; &nbsp; public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain filterChain)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; throws IOException, ServletException {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; String token = jwtTokenProvider.resolveToken((HttpServletRequest) req);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (token != null && jwtTokenProvider.validateToken(token)) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Authentication auth = token != null ? jwtTokenProvider.getAuthentication(token) : null;
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; SecurityContextHolder.getContext().setAuthentication(auth);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; filterChain.doFilter(req, res);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Next, create a class with the name JwtConfigurer for JWT configuration in configs package then replace all codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs;

import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.SecurityConfigurerAdapter;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.builders.HttpSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.web.DefaultSecurityFilterChain;
import org.springframework.security.web.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter;

public class JwtConfigurer extends SecurityConfigurerAdapter<DefaultSecurityFilterChain, HttpSecurity> {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

&nbsp; &nbsp; public JwtConfigurer(JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; this.jwtTokenProvider = jwtTokenProvider;
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @Override
&nbsp; &nbsp; public void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; JwtTokenFilter customFilter = new JwtTokenFilter(jwtTokenProvider);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; http.addFilterBefore(customFilter, UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter.class);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Finally, we have to configure the Spring Security by creating a Java class file inside configs package with the name WebSecurityConfig. Give annotations to this class and extends Spring WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter.

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
}

Inject JWT token provider inside this class.

@Autowired
JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

Add an override method to configure Authentication Manager Builder.

@Override
protected void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;UserDetailsService userDetailsService = mongoUserDetails();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;auth.userDetailsService(userDetailsService).passwordEncoder(bCryptPasswordEncoder());

}

Next, add an override method to configure Spring Security Http Security.

@Override
protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;http.httpBasic().disable().csrf().disable().sessionManagement()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS).and().authorizeRequests()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.antMatchers("/api/auth/login").permitAll().antMatchers("/api/auth/register").permitAll()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.antMatchers("/api/products/**").hasAuthority("ADMIN").anyRequest().authenticated().and().csrf()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.disable().exceptionHandling().authenticationEntryPoint(unauthorizedEntryPoint()).and()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.apply(new JwtConfigurer(jwtTokenProvider));
}

Next, declare all required beans for this configuration.

@Bean
public PasswordEncoder bCryptPasswordEncoder() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return new BCryptPasswordEncoder();
}

@Bean
@Override
public AuthenticationManager authenticationManagerBean() throws Exception {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return super.authenticationManagerBean();
}

@Bean
public AuthenticationEntryPoint unauthorizedEntryPoint() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return (request, response, authException) -> response.sendError(HttpServletResponse.SC_UNAUTHORIZED,
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;"Unauthorized");
}

@Bean
public UserDetailsService mongoUserDetails() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return new CustomUserDetailsService();
}

6. Create Product and Authentication Controllers

Now it’s time for REST API endpoint. All RESTful API will be created from each controller. Product controller will handle CRUD endpoint of product and Authentication controller will handle login and register endpoint. Right-click project name -> New -> Class then fill the package with com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers and the class name as ProductController. Open and edit the newly created class file then replace all codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers;

import java.util.Optional;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Product;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories.ProductRepository;

@RestController
public class ProductController {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp; &nbsp; ProductRepository productRepository;

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.GET, value="/api/products")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public Iterable<Product> product() {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return productRepository.findAll();
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.POST, value="/api/products")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public String save(@RequestBody Product product) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; productRepository.save(product);

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return product.getId();
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.GET, value="/api/products/{id}")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public Optional<Product> show(@PathVariable String id) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return productRepository.findById(id);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.PUT, value="/api/products/{id}")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public Product update(@PathVariable String id, @RequestBody Product product) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Optional<Product> prod = productRepository.findById(id);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdName() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdName(product.getProdName());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdDesc() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdDesc(product.getProdDesc());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdPrice() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdPrice(product.getProdPrice());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdImage() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdImage(product.getProdImage());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; productRepository.save(prod.get());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return prod.get();
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.DELETE, value="/api/products/{id}")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public String delete(@PathVariable String id) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Optional<Product> product = productRepository.findById(id);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; productRepository.delete(product.get());

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return "product deleted";
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

For login, we need to create a POJO to mapping required fields of User. Create a new class file with the name AuthBody inside controllers package then replace all Java codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers;

public class AuthBody {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private String email;
&nbsp; &nbsp; private String password;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getEmail() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setEmail(String email) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.email = email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getPassword() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setPassword(String password) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.password = password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

}

Finally, create a controller for authentication with the name AuthController inside the controllers’ package. Open and edit that newly created file then replace all Java codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers;

import static org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity.ok;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.AuthenticationManager;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.BadCredentialsException;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken;
import org.springframework.security.core.AuthenticationException;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PostMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs.JwtTokenProvider;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.User;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories.UserRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.services.CustomUserDetailsService;

@RestController
@RequestMapping("/api/auth")
public class AuthController {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;AuthenticationManager authenticationManager;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;UserRepository users;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private CustomUserDetailsService userService;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@PostMapping("/login")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public ResponseEntity login(@RequestBody AuthBody data) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;try {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;String username = data.getEmail();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;authenticationManager.authenticate(new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(username, data.getPassword()));
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;String token = jwtTokenProvider.createToken(username, this.users.findByEmail(username).getRoles());
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Map<Object, Object> model = new HashMap<>();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;model.put("username", username);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;model.put("token", token);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return ok(model);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;} catch (AuthenticationException e) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;throw new BadCredentialsException("Invalid email/password supplied");
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@PostMapping("/register")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public ResponseEntity register(@RequestBody User user) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;User userExists = userService.findUserByEmail(user.getEmail());
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;if (userExists != null) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;throw new BadCredentialsException("User with username: " + user.getEmail() + " already exists");
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;userService.saveUser(user);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Map<Object, Object> model = new HashMap<>();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;model.put("message", "User registered successfully");
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return ok(model);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
}

7. Run and Test Spring Boot Security Rest using Postman

Before run and test the application, we have to populate a Role data first. Open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/SecurityRestApplication.java then add these lines of codes inside the initialization method.

@Bean
CommandLineRunner init(RoleRepository roleRepository) {

&nbsp; &nbsp; return args -> {

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Role adminRole = roleRepository.findByRole("ADMIN");
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (adminRole == null) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Role newAdminRole = new Role();
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; newAdminRole.setRole("ADMIN");
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; roleRepository.save(newAdminRole);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; };

}

Next, make sure you have run the MongoDB server on your local machine then run the Gradle application using this command.

./gradlew bootRun

Or in STS just right-click the project name -> Run As -> Spring Boot App. Next, open the Postman application then change the method to GET and address to localhost:8080/api/products then click Send button.

You will see this response in the bottom panel of Postman.

{
&nbsp; &nbsp; "timestamp": "2019-03-07T13:16:34.935+0000",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "status": 401,
&nbsp; &nbsp; "error": "Unauthorized",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "message": "Unauthorized",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "path": "/api/products"
}

Next, change the method to POST then address to localhost:8080/api/auth/register then fill the body with raw data as below image then click Send button.

You will get the response in the bottom panel of Postman.

{
&nbsp; &nbsp; "message": "User registered successfully"
}

Next, change the address to localhost:8080/api/auth/login and change the body as below then click Send button.

{ "email":"[email&nbsp;protected]", "password": "q1w2we3r4" }

You will see this response in the bottom panel of Postman.

{
&nbsp; &nbsp; "username": "[email&nbsp;protected]",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "token": "eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWIiOiJpbmZvQGRqYW13YXJlLmNvbSIsInJvbGVzIjpbeyJpZCI6IjVjODBjNjIzYjIwMTkxNGIyYTY5N2U4ZCIsInJvbGUiOiJBRE1JTiJ9XSwiaWF0IjoxNTUxOTY0OTc3LCJleHAiOjE1NTE5Njg1Nzd9.j5CHZ_LCmeQtdxQeH9eluxVXcOsHPWV1p8WnBn0CULo"
}

Copy the token then back to the GET product. Add a header with the name Authorization and the value that paste from a token that gets by login with additional Bearer prefix (with space) as below.

Bearer eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWIiOiJpbmZvQGRqYW13YXJlLmNvbSIsInJvbGVzIjpbeyJpZCI6IjVjODBjNjIzYjIwMTkxNGIyYTY5N2U4ZCIsInJvbGUiOiJBRE1JTiJ9XSwiaWF0IjoxNTUxOTY0OTc3LCJleHAiOjE1NTE5Njg1Nzd9.j5CHZ_LCmeQtdxQeH9eluxVXcOsHPWV1p8WnBn0CULo

You should see this response after clicking the Send button.

[
&nbsp; &nbsp; {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "id": "5c80dc6cb20191520567b68a",
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodName": "Dummy Product 1",
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodDesc": "The Fresh Dummy Product in The world part 1",
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodPrice": 100,
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodImage": "https://dummyimage.com/600x400/000/fff"
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
]

You can test the POST product with the token in headers using the same way.

That it’s, the Securing RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB tutorial. You can get the full source code from our GitHub.

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What is a Security Vulnerability?

What is a Security Vulnerability?

### **What is a Security Vulnerability?** A security vulnerability is a weakness an adversary could take advantage of to compromise the confidentiality, availability, or integrity of a resource. In this context a weakness refers to...

What is a Security Vulnerability?

A security vulnerability is a weakness an adversary could take advantage of to compromise the confidentiality, availability, or integrity of a resource.

In this context a weakness refers to implementation flaws or security implications due to design choices. For instance, being able to overrun a buffer’s boundaries while writing data to it introduces a buffer overflow vulnerability. Examples of notable vulnerabilities are Heartbleed, Shellshock/Bash and POODLE.

**

What is vulnerability assessment**

A vulnerability assessment is a systematic review of security weaknesses in an information system. It evaluates if the system is susceptible to any known vulnerabilities, assigns severity levels to those vulnerabilities, and recommends remediation or mitigation, if and whenever needed.

Examples of threats that can be prevented by vulnerability assessment include:

  • SQL injection, XSS and other code injection attacks.
    Escalation of privileges due to faulty authentication mechanisms.

  • Insecure defaults – software that ships with insecure settings, such as a guessable admin passwords.
    There are several types of vulnerability assessments. These include:

  • Host assessment – The assessment of critical servers, which may be vulnerable to attacks if not adequately tested or not generated from a tested machine image.

  • Network and wireless assessment – The assessment of policies and practices to prevent unauthorized access to private or public networks and network-accessible resources.

  • Database assessment – The assessment of databases or big data systems for vulnerabilities and misconfigurations, identifying rogue databases or insecure dev/test environments, and classifying sensitive data across an organization’s infrastructure.

  • Application scans – The identifying of security vulnerabilities in web applications and their source code by automated scans on the front-end or static/dynamic analysis of source code.