HR Executive Questions for Freshers ( Vestino Technologies)

BASIC HR EXECUTIVE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS
FOR FRESHERS
1)Can you tell us something about yourself?
2)What are your biggest strength?
3)What are your weakness?
4)Why are you interested in a human resources role?
5)What interpersonal skills are important in this role?
6)What is HR?
7)What are the functions of HR?
8)What are the roles and responsibilities of HR?
9)What is recruitment?
10)What are the day to day activities in recruitment?
11)Where did you see yourself in 5 years?
12)Assuming that you’re selected, what will be your strategy for next 60 days?
13)Would you like to ask us anything?

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Grace  Lesch

Grace Lesch

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PySQL Tutorial: A Database Framework for Python

PySQL 

PySQL is database framework for Python (v3.x) Language, Which is based on Python module mysql.connector, this module can help you to make your code more short and more easier. Before using this framework you must have knowledge about list, tuple, set, dictionary because all codes are designed using it. It's totally free and open source.

Tutorial Video in English (Watch Now)

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Installation

Before we said that this framework is based on mysql.connector so you have to install mysql.connector first on your system. Then you can import pysql and enjoy coding!

python -m pip install mysql-connector-python

After Install mysql.connector successfully create Python file download/install pysql on the same dir where you want to create program. You can clone is using git or npm command, and you can also downlaod manually from repository site.

PyPi Command

Go to https://pypi.org/project/pysql-framework/ or use command

pip install pysql-framework

Git Command

git clone https://github.com/rohit-chouhan/pysql

Npm Command

Go to https://www.npmjs.com/package/pysql or use command

$ npm i pysql

Snippet Extention for VS Code

Install From Here https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=rohit-chouhan.pysql

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Table of contents

Connecting a Server


To connect a database with localhost server or phpmyadmin, use connect method to establish your python with database server.

import pysql

db = pysql.connect(
    "host",
    "username",
    "password"
 )

Create a Database in Server


Creating database in server, to use this method

import pysql

db = pysql.connect(
    "host",
    "username",
    "password"
 )
 pysql.createDb(db,"demo")
 #execute: CREATE DATABASE demo

Drop Database


To drop database use this method .

Syntex Code -

pysql.dropDb([connect_obj,"table_name"])

Example Code -

pysql.dropDb([db,"demo"])
#execute:DROP DATABASE demo

Connecting a Database


To connect a database with localhost server or phpmyadmin, use connect method to establish your python with database server.

import pysql

db = pysql.connect(
    "host",
    "username",
    "password",
    "database"
 )

Creating Table in Database


To create table in database use this method to pass column name as key and data type as value.

Syntex Code -


pysql.createTable([db,"table_name_to_create"],{
    "column_name":"data_type", 
    "column_name":"data_type"
})

Example Code -


pysql.createTable([db,"details"],{
    "id":"int(11) primary", 
     "name":"text", 
    "email":"varchar(50)",
    "address":"varchar(500)"
})

2nd Example Code -

Use can use any Constraint with Data Value


pysql.createTable([db,"details"],{
    "id":"int NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY", 
     "name":"varchar(20) NOT NULL", 
    "email":"varchar(50)",
    "address":"varchar(500)"
})

Drop Table in Database


To drop table in database use this method .

Syntex Code -

pysql.dropTable([connect_obj,"table_name"])

Example Code -

pysql.dropTable([db,"users"])
#execute:DROP TABLE users

Selecting data from Table


For Select data from table, you have to mention the connector object with table name. pass column names in set.

Syntex For All Data (*)-

records = pysql.selectAll([db,"table_name"])
for x in records:
  print(x)

Example - -

records = pysql.selectAll([db,"details"])
for x in records:
  print(x)
#execute: SELECT * FROM details

Syntex For Specific Column-

records = pysql.select([db,"table_name"],{"column","column"})
for x in records:
  print(x)

Example - -

records = pysql.select([db,"details"],{"name","email"})
for x in records:
  print(x)
#execute: SELECT name, email FROM details

Syntex Where and Where Not-

#For Where Column=Data
records = pysql.selectWhere([db,"table_name"],{"column","column"},("column","data"))

#For Where Not Column=Data (use ! with column)
records = pysql.selectWhere([db,"table_name"],{"column","column"},("column!","data"))
for x in records:
  print(x)

Example - -

records = pysql.selectWhere([db,"details"],{"name","email"},("county","india"))
for x in records:
  print(x)
#execute: SELECT name, email FROM details WHERE country='india'

Add New Column to Table


To add column in table, use this method to pass column name as key and data type as value. Note: you can only add one column only one call

Syntex Code -


pysql.addColumn([db,"table_name"],{
    "column_name":"data_type"
})

Example Code -


pysql.addColumn([db,"details"],{
    "email":"varchar(50)"
})
#execute: ALTER TABLE details ADD email varchar(50);

Modify Column to Table


To modify data type of column table, use this method to pass column name as key and data type as value.

Syntex Code -

pysql.modifyColumn([db,"table_name"],{
    "column_name":"new_data_type"
})

Example Code -

pysql.modifyColumn([db,"details"],{
    "email":"text"
})
#execute: ALTER TABLE details MODIFY COLUMN email text;

Drop Column from Table


Note: you can only add one column only one call

Syntex Code -

pysql.dropColumn([db,"table_name"],"column_name")

Example Code -

pysql.dropColumn([db,"details"],"name")
#execute: ALTER TABLE details DROP COLUMN name

Manual Execute Query


To execute manual SQL Query to use this method.

Syntex Code -

pysql.query(connector_object,your_query)

Example Code -

pysql.query(db,"INSERT INTO users (name) VALUES ('Rohit')")

Inserting data


For Inserting data in database, you have to mention the connector object with table name, and data as sets.

Syntex -

data =     {
    "db_column":"Data for Insert",
    "db_column":"Data for Insert"
}
pysql.insert([db,"table_name"],data)

Example Code -

data =     {
    "name":"Komal Sharma",
    "contry":"India"
}
pysql.insert([db,"users"],data)

Updating data


For Update data in database, you have to mention the connector object with table name, and data as tuple.

Syntex For Updating All Data-

data = ("column","data to update")
pysql.updateAll([db,"users"],data)

Example - -

data = ("name","Rohit")
pysql.updateAll([db,"users"],data)
#execute: UPDATE users SET name='Rohit'

Syntex For Updating Data (Where and Where Not)-

data = ("column","data to update")
#For Where Column=Data
where = ("column","data")

#For Where Not Column=Data (use ! with column)
where = ("column!","data")
pysql.update([db,"users"],data,where)

Example -

data = ("name","Rohit")
where = ("id",1)
pysql.update([db,"users"],data,where)
#execute: UPDATE users SET name='Rohit' WHERE id=1

Deleting data


For Delete data in database, you have to mention the connector object with table name.

Syntex For Delete All Data-

pysql.deleteAll([db,"table_name"])

Example - -

pysql.deleteAll([db,"users"])
#execute: DELETE FROM users

Syntex For Deleting Data (Where and Where Not)-

where = ("column","data")

pysql.delete([db,"table_name"],where)

Example -

#For Where Column=Data
where = ("id",1)

#For Where Not Column=Data (use ! with column)
where = ("id!",1)
pysql.delete([db,"users"],where)
#execute: DELETE FROM users WHERE id=1

--- Finish ---

Change Logs

[19/06/2021]
 - ConnectSever() removed and merged to Connect()
 - deleteAll() [Fixed]
 - dropTable() [Added]
 - dropDb() [Added]
 
[20/06/2021]
 - Where Not Docs [Added]

The module is designed by Rohit Chouhan, contact us for any bug report, feature or business inquiry.

Author: rohit-chouhan
Source Code: https://github.com/rohit-chouhan/pysql
License: Apache-2.0 License

#python 

Top 130 Android Interview Questions - Crack Technical Interview Now!

Android Interview Questions and Answers from Beginner to Advanced level

DataFlair is committed to provide you all the resources to make you an android professional. We started with android tutorials along with practicals, then we published Real-time android projects along with source code. Now, we come up with frequently asked android interview questions, which will help you in showing expertise in your next interview.

android interview questions

Android Interview Questions – Get ready for your next interview

Android – one of the hottest technologies, which is having a bright future. Get ready to crack your next interview with the following android interview questions. These interview questions start with basic and cover deep concepts along with advanced topics.

Android Interview Questions for Freshers

1. What is Android?

Android is an open-source mobile operating system that is based on the modified versions of Linux kernel. Though it was mainly designed for smartphones, now it is being used for Tablets, Televisions, Smartwatches, and other Android wearables.

2. Who is the inventor of Android Technology?

The inventors of Android Technology are- Andry Rubin, Nick Sears, and Rich Miner.

3. What is the latest version of Android?

The latest version of Android is Android 10.0, known as Android Q. The upcoming major Android release is Android 11, which is the 18th version of Android. [Note: Keep checking the versions, it is as of June 2020.]

4. How many Android versions can you recall right now?

Till now, there are 17 versions of Android, which have their names in alphabetical order. The 18th version of Android is also going to come later this year. The versions of Android are here:

  • Android 1.0 – Its release is 23 September 2008.
  • Android 1.1 – Its release date is 9 February 2009.
  • Android 1.5 – Its name is Cupcake, Released on 27 April 2009.
  • Android 1.6 – Its name is Donut, Released on 15 September 2009.
  • Android 2.0 – Its name is Eclair, Released on 26 October 2009
  • Android 2.2 – Its name is Froyo, Released on 20 May 2010.
  • Android 2.3 – Its name is Gingerbread, Released on 06 December 2010.
  • Android 3.0 – Its name is Honeycomb, Released on 22 February 2011.
  • Android 4.0 – Its name is Ice Cream Sandwich, Released on 18 October 2011.
  • Android 4.1 – Its name is Jelly Bean, Released on 9 July 2012.
  • Android 4.4 – Its name is KitKat, Released on 31 October 2013.
  • Android 5.0 – Its name is Lollipop, Released on 12 November 2014.
  • Android 6.0 – Its name is Marshmallow, Released on 5 October 2015.
  • Android 7.0 – Its name is Nougat, Released on 22 August 2016.
  • Android 8.0 – Its name is Oreo, Released on 21 August 2017.
  • Android 9.0 – Its name is Pie, Released on 6 August 2018.
  • Android 10.0 – Its name is Android Q, Released on 3 September 2019.
  • Android 11.0 – As of now, it is Android 11.

5. Explain the Android Architecture with its components.

This is a popular android developer interview question

Android Architecture consists of 5 components that are-

a. Linux Kernel: It is the foundation of the Android Architecture that resides at the lowest level. It provides the level of abstraction for hardware devices and upper layer components. Linux Kernel also provides various important hardware drivers that act as software interfaces for hardwares like camera, bluetooth, etc.

b. Native Libraries: These are the libraries for Android that are written in C/C++. These libraries are useful to build many core services like ART and HAL. It provides support for core features.

c. Android Runtime: It is an Android Runtime Environment. Android Operating System uses it during the execution of the app. It performs the translation of the application bytecode into the native instructions. The runtime environment of the device then executes these native instructions.

d. Application Framework: Application Framework provides many java classes and interfaces for app development. And it also provides various high-level services. This complete Application framework makes use of Java.

e. Applications: This is the topmost layer of Android Architecture. It provides applications for the end-user, so they can use the android device and compute the tasks.

6. What are the services that the Application framework provides?

The Android application framework has the following key services-

a. Activity Manager: It uses testing and debugging methods.

b. Content provider: It provides the data from application to other layers.

c. Resource Manager: This provides users access to resources.

d. Notification Manager: This gives notification to the users regarding actions taking place in the background.

e. View System: It is the base class for widgets, and it is also responsible for event handling.

7. What are the important features of Linux Kernel?

The important features of the Linux Kernel are as follows:

a. Power Management: Linux Kernel does power management to enhance and improve the battery life of the device.

b. Memory Management: It is useful for the maximum utilization of the available memory of the device.

c. Device Management: It includes managing all the hardware device drivers. It maximizes the utilization of the available resources.

d. Security: It ensures that no application has any such permission that it affects any other application in order to maintain security.

e. Multi-tasking: Multi-tasking provides the users the ease of doing multiple tasks at the same time.

8. What are the building blocks of an Android Application?

This is a popular android interview question for freshers.

The main components of any Android application are- Activity, Services, Content Provider, and Broadcast Receiver. You can understand them as follows:

a. Activity- It is a class that acts as the entry point representing a single screen to the user. It is like a window to show the user interface.

b. Services- Services are the longest-running component that runs in the background.

c. Content Provider- The content provider is an essential component that allows apps to share data between themselves.

d. Broadcast receivers- Broadcast receiver is another most crucial application component. It helps the apps to receive and respond to broadcast messages from the system or some other application.

9. What are the important components of Android Application?

The Components of Android application are listed below:

  1. Widgets
  2. Intents
  3. Views
  4. Notification
  5. Fragments
  6. Layout XML files
  7. Resources

10. What are the widgets?

Widgets are the variations of Broadcast receivers. They are an important part of home screen customization. They often display some data and also allow users to perform actions on them. Mostly they display the app icon on the screen.

11. Can you name some types of widgets?

Mentioned below are the types of widgets-

a. Informative Widgets: These widgets show some important information. Like, the clock widget or a weather widget.

b. Collective Widgets: They are the collection of some types of elements. For example, a music widget that lets us change, skip, or forward the song.

c. Control Widgets: These widgets help us control the actions within the application through it. Like an email widget that helps check the recent mails.

d. Hybrid Widgets: Hybrid widgets are those that consist of at least two or more types of widgets.

12. What are Intents?

Intents are an important part of Android Applications. They enable communication between components of the same application as well as separate applications. The Intent signals the Android system about a certain event that has occurred.

13. Explain the types of intents briefly?

Intent is of three types that are-

a. Implicit Intents: Implicit intents are those in which there is no description of the component name but only the action.

b. Explicit Intents: In explicit intents, the target component is present by declaring the name of the component.

c. Pending Intents: These are those intents that act as a shield over the Intent objects. It covers the intent objects and grants permission to the external app components to access them.

14. What is a View?

A view is an important building block that helps in designing the user interface of the application. It can be a rectangular box or a circular shape, for example, Text View, Edit Text, Buttons, etc. Views occupy a certain area of the screen, and it is also responsible for event handling. A view is the superclass of all the graphical user interface components.

15. What do you understand by View Group?

It is the subclass of the ViewClass. It gives an invisible container to hold layouts or views. You can understand view groups as special views that are capable of holding other views, that are Child View.

16. What do you understand about Shared Preferences?

It is a simple mechanism for data storage in Android. In this, there is no need to create files, and using APIs, it stores the data in XML files. It stores the data in the pair of key-values. SharedPreferences class lets the user save the values and retrieve them when required. Using SharedPreferences we can save primitive data like- boolean, float, integer, string and long.

17. What is a Notification?

A notification is just like a message that shows up outside the Application UI to provide reminders to the users. They remind the user about a message received, or some other timely information from the app.

18. Give names of Notification types.

There are three types of notifications namely-

a. Toast Notification- This notification is the one that fades away sometime after it pops up.

b. Status Notification- This notification stays till the user takes some action on it.

c. Dialog Notification- This notification is the result of an Active Activity.

19. What are fragments?

A fragment is a part of the complete user interface. These are present in Activity, and an activity can have one or more fragments at the same time. We can reuse a fragment in multiple activities as well.

20. What are the types of fragments?

There are three types of fragments that are: Single Fragment, List Fragment, Fragment Transactions.

  1. Single Transactions can only show a single view for the user.
  2. List Fragments have a special list view feature that provides a list from which the user can select one.
  3. Fragment Transactions are helpful for the transition between one fragment to the other.

Frequently asked Android Interview Questions and Answers

21. What are Layout XML files?

Layout XML files contain the structure for the user interface of the application. The XML file also contains various different layouts and views, and they also specify various GUI components that are there in Activity or fragments.

22. What are Resources in Android Application?

The resources in Android Apps defines images, texts, strings, colors, etc. Everything in resources directory is referenced in the source code of the app so that we can use them.

23. Can you develop Android Apps with languages other than Java? If so, name some.

Yes, there are many languages that we can work with, for the development of Android Applications. To name some, I would say Java, Python, C, C++, Kotlin, C#, Corona/LUA.

24. What are the states of the Activity Lifecycle?

Activity lifecycle has the following four stages-

a. Running State: As soon as the activity starts, it is the first state.

b. Paused State: When some other activity starts without closing the previous one, the running activity turns into the Paused state.

c. Resume State: When the activity opens again after being in pause state, it comes into the Resume State.

d. Stopped State: When the user closes the application or stops using it, the activity goes to the Stopped state.

25. What are some methods of Activity?

The methods of Activity are as follows:

  • onCreate()
  • onStart()
  • onPause()
  • onRestart()
  • onResume()
  • onStop()
  • onDestroy()

26. How can you launch an activity in Android?

We launch an activity using Intents. For this we need to use intent as follows:

  1. ntent intent_name= new Intent(this, Activity_name.class);
  2. startActivity(intent_name);

27. What is the service lifecycle?

There are two states of a service that are-

a. Started State: This is when the service starts its execution. A Services come in start state only through the startService() method.

b. Bounded State: A service is in the bounded state when it calls the method bindService().

28. What are some methods of Services?

The methods of service are as follows-

  • onStartCommand()
  • onBind()
  • onCreate()
  • onUnbind()
  • onDestroy()
  • onRebind()

29. What are the types of Broadcast?

Broadcasts are of two types that are-

a. Ordered Broadcast: Ordered broadcasts are Synchronous and work in a proper order. It decides the order by using the priority assigned to the broadcasts.

b. Normal Broadcast: These are asynchronous and unordered. They are more efficient as they run unorderly and all at once. But, they lack full utilization of the results.

30. What are useful impotent folders in Android?

The impotent folders in an Android application are-

  1. build.xml- It is responsible for the build of Android applications.
  2. bin/ – The bin folder works as a staging area to wrap the files packages into the APK.
  3. src/ – The src is a folder where all the source files of the project are present.
  4. res/ – The res is the resource folder that stores values of the resources that are used in the application. These resources can be colors, styles, strings, dimensions, etc.
  5. assets/ – It provides a facility to include files like text, XML, fonts, music, and video in the Android application.

31. What are the important files for Android Application when working on Android Studio?

This is an important android studio interview question

There are following three files that we need to work on for an application to work-

a. The AndroidManifest.xml file: It has all the information about the application.

b. The MainActivity.java file: It is the app file that actually gets converted to the dalvik executable and runs the application. It is written in java.

c. The Activity_main.xml file: It is the layout file that is available in the res/layout directory. It is another mostly used file while developing the application.

32. Which database do you use for Android Application development?

The database that we use for Android Applications is SQLite. It is because SQLite is lightweight and specially developed for Android Apps. SQLite works the same way as SQL using the same commands.

33. Tell us some features of Android OS.

The best features of Android include-

  1. Multi-tasking
  2. Support for a great range of languages
  3. Support for split-screen
  4. High connectivity with 5G support
  5. Motion Control

34. Why did you learn Android development?

Learning Android Studio is a good idea because of the following-

  1. It has a low application development cost.
  2. It is an open-source platform.
  3. It has multi-platform support as well as Multi-carrier support.
  4. It is open for customizations.
  5. Android is a largely used operating system throughout the world.

35. What are the different ways of storage supported in Android?

The various storage ways supported in Android are as follows:

  1. Shared Preference
  2. Internal Storage
  3. External Storage
  4. SQLite Databases
  5. Network Connection

36. What are layouts?

Layout is nothing but arrangements of elements on the device screen. These elements can be images, tests, videos, anything. They basically define the structure of the Android user interface to make it user friendly.

37. How many layout types are there?

The type of layouts used in Android Apps are as follows:

  1. Linear Layout
  2. Relative Layout
  3. Constraint Layout
  4. Table Layout
  5. Frame Layout
  6. Absolute Layout
  7. Scrollview layout

38. What is an APK?

An APK stands for Android Package that is a file format of Android Applications. Android OS uses this package for the distribution and installation of the Android Application.

39. What is an Android Manifest file?

The manifest file describes all the essential information about the project application for build tools, Android operating system, and google play. This file is a must for every Android project that we develop, and it is present in the root of the project source set.

#android tutorials #android basic interview questions #android basic questions #android developer interview questions #android interview question and answer #android interview questions #android interview questions for experienced #android interview questions for fresher

Top five technologies among young entrepreneurs

With transformational changes seen in the business and technology front, Entrepreneurs’ view towards technologies is changing. Here are the top technologies that young entrepreneurs can embed to increase their business performance.

#top five technologies among young entrepreneurs #upcoming and established technologies #best technologies for entrepreneurs #selection of better technologies #top five technologies #business and technology

Lokesh Kumar

1603438098

Top 10 Trending Technologies Must Learn in 2021 | igmGuru

Technology has taken a place of more productiveness and give the best to the world. In the current situation, everything is done through the technical process, you don’t have to bother about doing task, everything will be done automatically.This is an article which has some important technologies which are new in the market are explained according to the career preferences. So let’s have a look into the top trending technologies followed in 2021 and its impression in the coming future in the world.

  1. Data Science
    First in the list of newest technologies is surprisingly Data Science. Data Science is the automation that helps to be reasonable for complicated data. The data is produces in a very large amount every day by several companies which comprise sales data, customer profile information, server data, business data, and financial structures. Almost all of the data which is in the form of big data is very indeterminate. The character of a data scientist is to convert the indeterminate datasets into determinate datasets. Then these structured data will examine to recognize trends and patterns. These trends and patterns are beneficial to understand the company’s business performance, customer retention, and how they can be enhanced.

  2. DevOps
    Next one is DevOps, This technology is a mixture of two different things and they are development (Dev) and operations (Ops). This process and technology provide value to their customers in a continuous manner. This technology plays an important role in different aspects and they can be- IT operations, development, security, quality, and engineering to synchronize and cooperate to develop the best and more definitive products. By embracing a culture of DevOps with creative tools and techniques, because through that company will gain the capacity to preferable comeback to consumer requirement, expand the confidence in the request they construct, and accomplish business goals faster. This makes DevOps come into the top 10 trending technologies.

  3. Machine learning
    Next one is Machine learning which is constantly established in all the categories of companies or industries, generating a high command for skilled professionals. The machine learning retailing business is looking forward to enlarging to $8.81 billion by 2022. Machine learning practices is basically use for data mining, data analytics, and pattern recognition. In today’s scenario, Machine learning has its own reputed place in the industry. This makes machine learning come into the top 10 trending technologies. Get the best machine learning course and make yourself future-ready.

To want to know more click on Top 10 Trending Technologies in 2021

You may also read more blogs mentioned below

How to Become a Salesforce Developer

Python VS R Programming

The Scope of Hadoop and Big Data in 2021

#top trending technologies #top 10 trending technologies #top 10 trending technologies in 2021 #top trending technologies in 2021 #top 5 trending technologies in 2021 #top 5 trending technologies

Activeinteraction: Manage Application Specific Business Logic Of Ruby

ActiveInteraction

ActiveInteraction manages application-specific business logic. It's an implementation of service objects designed to blend seamlessly into Rails. 


ActiveInteraction gives you a place to put your business logic. It also helps you write safer code by validating that your inputs conform to your expectations. If ActiveModel deals with your nouns, then ActiveInteraction handles your verbs.

API Documentation

Installation

Add it to your Gemfile:

gem 'active_interaction', '~> 5.1'

Or install it manually:

$ gem install active_interaction --version '~> 5.1'

This project uses Semantic Versioning. Check out GitHub releases for a detailed list of changes.

Basic usage

To define an interaction, create a subclass of ActiveInteraction::Base. Then you need to do two things:

Define your inputs. Use class filter methods to define what you expect your inputs to look like. For instance, if you need a boolean flag for pepperoni, use boolean :pepperoni. Check out the filters section for all the available options.

Define your business logic. Do this by implementing the #execute method. Each input you defined will be available as the type you specified. If any of the inputs are invalid, #execute won't be run. Filters are responsible for checking your inputs. Check out the validations section if you need more than that.

That covers the basics. Let's put it all together into a simple example that squares a number.

require 'active_interaction'

class Square < ActiveInteraction::Base
  float :x

  def execute
    x**2
  end
end

Call .run on your interaction to execute it. You must pass a single hash to .run. It will return an instance of your interaction. By convention, we call this an outcome. You can use the #valid? method to ask the outcome if it's valid. If it's invalid, take a look at its errors with #errors. In either case, the value returned from #execute will be stored in #result.

outcome = Square.run(x: 'two point one')
outcome.valid?
# => nil
outcome.errors.messages
# => {:x=>["is not a valid float"]}

outcome = Square.run(x: 2.1)
outcome.valid?
# => true
outcome.result
# => 4.41

You can also use .run! to execute interactions. It's like .run but more dangerous. It doesn't return an outcome. If the outcome would be invalid, it will instead raise an error. But if the outcome would be valid, it simply returns the result.

Square.run!(x: 'two point one')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: X is not a valid float
Square.run!(x: 2.1)
# => 4.41

Validations

ActiveInteraction checks your inputs. Often you'll want more than that. For instance, you may want an input to be a string with at least one non-whitespace character. Instead of writing your own validation for that, you can use validations from ActiveModel.

These validations aren't provided by ActiveInteraction. They're from ActiveModel. You can also use any custom validations you wrote yourself in your interactions.

class SayHello < ActiveInteraction::Base
  string :name

  validates :name,
    presence: true

  def execute
    "Hello, #{name}!"
  end
end

When you run this interaction, two things will happen. First ActiveInteraction will check your inputs. Then ActiveModel will validate them. If both of those are happy, it will be executed.

SayHello.run!(name: nil)
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Name is required

SayHello.run!(name: '')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Name can't be blank

SayHello.run!(name: 'Taylor')
# => "Hello, Taylor!"

Filters

You can define filters inside an interaction using the appropriate class method. Each method has the same signature:

Some symbolic names. These are the attributes to create.

An optional hash of options. Each filter supports at least these two options:

default is the fallback value to use if nil is given. To make a filter optional, set default: nil.

desc is a human-readable description of the input. This can be useful for generating documentation. For more information about this, read the descriptions section.

An optional block of sub-filters. Only array and hash filters support this. Other filters will ignore blocks when given to them.

Let's take a look at an example filter. It defines three inputs: x, y, and z. Those inputs are optional and they all share the same description ("an example filter").

array :x, :y, :z,
  default: nil,
  desc: 'an example filter' do
    # Some filters support sub-filters here.
  end

In general, filters accept values of the type they correspond to, plus a few alternatives that can be reasonably coerced. Typically the coercions come from Rails, so "1" can be interpreted as the boolean value true, the string "1", or the number 1.

Basic Filters

Array

In addition to accepting arrays, array inputs will convert ActiveRecord::Relations into arrays.

class ArrayInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  array :toppings

  def execute
    toppings.size
  end
end

ArrayInteraction.run!(toppings: 'everything')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Toppings is not a valid array
ArrayInteraction.run!(toppings: [:cheese, 'pepperoni'])
# => 2

Use a block to constrain the types of elements an array can contain. Note that you can only have one filter inside an array block, and it must not have a name.

array :birthdays do
  date
end

For interface, object, and record filters, the name of the array filter will be singularized and used to determine the type of value passed. In the example below, the objects passed would need to be of type Cow.

array :cows do
  object
end

You can override this by passing the necessary information to the inner filter.

array :managers do
  object class: People
end

Errors that occur will be indexed based on the Rails configuration setting index_nested_attribute_errors. You can also manually override this setting with the :index_errors option. In this state is is possible to get multiple errors from a single filter.

class ArrayInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  array :favorite_numbers, index_errors: true do
    integer
  end

  def execute
    favorite_numbers
  end
end

ArrayInteraction.run(favorite_numbers: [8, 'bazillion']).errors.details
=> {:"favorite_numbers[1]"=>[{:error=>:invalid_type, :type=>"array"}]}

With :index_errors set to false the error would have been:

{:favorite_numbers=>[{:error=>:invalid_type, :type=>"array"}]}

Boolean

Boolean filters convert the strings "1", "true", and "on" (case-insensitive) into true. They also convert "0", "false", and "off" into false. Blank strings will be treated as nil.

class BooleanInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  boolean :kool_aid

  def execute
    'Oh yeah!' if kool_aid
  end
end

BooleanInteraction.run!(kool_aid: 1)
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Kool aid is not a valid boolean
BooleanInteraction.run!(kool_aid: true)
# => "Oh yeah!"

File

File filters also accept TempFiles and anything that responds to #rewind. That means that you can pass the params from uploading files via forms in Rails.

class FileInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  file :readme

  def execute
    readme.size
  end
end

FileInteraction.run!(readme: 'README.md')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Readme is not a valid file
FileInteraction.run!(readme: File.open('README.md'))
# => 21563

Hash

Hash filters accept hashes. The expected value types are given by passing a block and nesting other filters. You can have any number of filters inside a hash, including other hashes.

class HashInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  hash :preferences do
    boolean :newsletter
    boolean :sweepstakes
  end

  def execute
    puts 'Thanks for joining the newsletter!' if preferences[:newsletter]
    puts 'Good luck in the sweepstakes!' if preferences[:sweepstakes]
  end
end

HashInteraction.run!(preferences: 'yes, no')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Preferences is not a valid hash
HashInteraction.run!(preferences: { newsletter: true, 'sweepstakes' => false })
# Thanks for joining the newsletter!
# => nil

Setting default hash values can be tricky. The default value has to be either nil or {}. Use nil to make the hash optional. Use {} if you want to set some defaults for values inside the hash.

hash :optional,
  default: nil
# => {:optional=>nil}

hash :with_defaults,
  default: {} do
    boolean :likes_cookies,
      default: true
  end
# => {:with_defaults=>{:likes_cookies=>true}}

By default, hashes remove any keys that aren't given as nested filters. To allow all hash keys, set strip: false. In general we don't recommend doing this, but it's sometimes necessary.

hash :stuff,
  strip: false

String

String filters define inputs that only accept strings.

class StringInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  string :name

  def execute
    "Hello, #{name}!"
  end
end

StringInteraction.run!(name: 0xDEADBEEF)
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Name is not a valid string
StringInteraction.run!(name: 'Taylor')
# => "Hello, Taylor!"

String filter strips leading and trailing whitespace by default. To disable it, set the strip option to false.

string :comment,
  strip: false

Symbol

Symbol filters define inputs that accept symbols. Strings will be converted into symbols.

class SymbolInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  symbol :method

  def execute
    method.to_proc
  end
end

SymbolInteraction.run!(method: -> {})
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Method is not a valid symbol
SymbolInteraction.run!(method: :object_id)
# => #<Proc:0x007fdc9ba94118>

Dates and times

Filters that work with dates and times behave similarly. By default, they all convert strings into their expected data types using .parse. Blank strings will be treated as nil. If you give the format option, they will instead convert strings using .strptime. Note that formats won't work with DateTime and Time filters if a time zone is set.

Date

class DateInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  date :birthday

  def execute
    birthday + (18 * 365)
  end
end

DateInteraction.run!(birthday: 'yesterday')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Birthday is not a valid date
DateInteraction.run!(birthday: Date.new(1989, 9, 1))
# => #<Date: 2007-08-28 ((2454341j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>
date :birthday,
  format: '%Y-%m-%d'

DateTime

class DateTimeInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  date_time :now

  def execute
    now.iso8601
  end
end

DateTimeInteraction.run!(now: 'now')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Now is not a valid date time
DateTimeInteraction.run!(now: DateTime.now)
# => "2015-03-11T11:04:40-05:00"
date_time :start,
  format: '%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S'

Time

In addition to converting strings with .parse (or .strptime), time filters convert numbers with .at.

class TimeInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  time :epoch

  def execute
    Time.now - epoch
  end
end

TimeInteraction.run!(epoch: 'a long, long time ago')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Epoch is not a valid time
TimeInteraction.run!(epoch: Time.new(1970))
# => 1426068362.5136619
time :start,
  format: '%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S'

Numbers

All numeric filters accept numeric input. They will also convert strings using the appropriate method from Kernel (like .Float). Blank strings will be treated as nil.

Decimal

class DecimalInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  decimal :price

  def execute
    price * 1.0825
  end
end

DecimalInteraction.run!(price: 'one ninety-nine')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Price is not a valid decimal
DecimalInteraction.run!(price: BigDecimal(1.99, 2))
# => #<BigDecimal:7fe792a42028,'0.2165E1',18(45)>

To specify the number of significant digits, use the digits option.

decimal :dollars,
  digits: 2

Float

class FloatInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  float :x

  def execute
    x**2
  end
end

FloatInteraction.run!(x: 'two point one')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: X is not a valid float
FloatInteraction.run!(x: 2.1)
# => 4.41

Integer

class IntegerInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  integer :limit

  def execute
    limit.downto(0).to_a
  end
end

IntegerInteraction.run!(limit: 'ten')
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Limit is not a valid integer
IntegerInteraction.run!(limit: 10)
# => [10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0]

When a String is passed into an integer input, the value will be coerced. A default base of 10 is used though it may be overridden with the base option. If a base of 0 is provided, the coercion will respect radix indicators present in the string.

class IntegerInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  integer :limit1
  integer :limit2, base: 8
  integer :limit3, base: 0

  def execute
    [limit1, limit2, limit3]
  end
end

IntegerInteraction.run!(limit1: 71, limit2: 71, limit3: 71)
# => [71, 71, 71]
IntegerInteraction.run!(limit1: "071", limit2: "071", limit3: "0x71")
# => [71, 57, 113]
IntegerInteraction.run!(limit1: "08", limit2: "08", limit3: "08")
ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Limit2 is not a valid integer, Limit3 is not a valid integer

Advanced Filters

Interface

Interface filters allow you to specify an interface that the passed value must meet in order to pass. The name of the interface is used to look for a constant inside the ancestor listing for the passed value. This allows for a variety of checks depending on what's passed. Class instances are checked for an included module or an inherited ancestor class. Classes are checked for an extended module or an inherited ancestor class. Modules are checked for an extended module.

class InterfaceInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  interface :exception

  def execute
    exception
  end
end

InterfaceInteraction.run!(exception: Exception)
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Exception is not a valid interface
InterfaceInteraction.run!(exception: NameError) # a subclass of Exception
# => NameError

You can use :from to specify a class or module. This would be the equivalent of what's above.

class InterfaceInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  interface :error,
    from: Exception

  def execute
    error
  end
end

You can also create an anonymous interface on the fly by passing the methods option.

class InterfaceInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  interface :serializer,
    methods: %i[dump load]

  def execute
    input = '{ "is_json" : true }'
    object = serializer.load(input)
    output = serializer.dump(object)

    output
  end
end

require 'json'

InterfaceInteraction.run!(serializer: Object.new)
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Serializer is not a valid interface
InterfaceInteraction.run!(serializer: JSON)
# => "{\"is_json\":true}"

Object

Object filters allow you to require an instance of a particular class or one of its subclasses.

class Cow
  def moo
    'Moo!'
  end
end

class ObjectInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  object :cow

  def execute
    cow.moo
  end
end

ObjectInteraction.run!(cow: Object.new)
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Cow is not a valid object
ObjectInteraction.run!(cow: Cow.new)
# => "Moo!"

The class name is automatically determined by the filter name. If your filter name is different than your class name, use the class option. It can be either the class, a string, or a symbol.

object :dolly1,
  class: Sheep
object :dolly2,
  class: 'Sheep'
object :dolly3,
  class: :Sheep

If you have value objects or you would like to build one object from another, you can use the converter option. It is only called if the value provided is not an instance of the class or one of its subclasses. The converter option accepts a symbol that specifies a class method on the object class or a proc. Both will be passed the value and any errors thrown inside the converter will cause the value to be considered invalid. Any returned value that is not the correct class will also be treated as invalid. Any default that is not an instance of the class or subclass and is not nil will also be converted.

class ObjectInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  object :ip_address,
    class: IPAddr,
    converter: :new

  def execute
    ip_address
  end
end

ObjectInteraction.run!(ip_address: '192.168.1.1')
# #<IPAddr: IPv4:192.168.1.1/255.255.255.255>

ObjectInteraction.run!(ip_address: 1)
# ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError: Ip address is not a valid object

Record

Record filters allow you to require an instance of a particular class (or one of its subclasses) or a value that can be used to locate an instance of the object. If the value does not match, it will call find on the class of the record. This is particularly useful when working with ActiveRecord objects. Like an object filter, the class is derived from the name passed but can be specified with the class option. Any default that is not an instance of the class or subclass and is not nil will also be found. Blank strings passed in will be treated as nil.

class RecordInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  record :encoding

  def execute
    encoding
  end
end

> RecordInteraction.run!(encoding: Encoding::US_ASCII)
=> #<Encoding:US-ASCII>

> RecordInteraction.run!(encoding: 'ascii')
=> #<Encoding:US-ASCII>

A different method can be specified by providing a symbol to the finder option.

Rails

ActiveInteraction plays nicely with Rails. You can use interactions to handle your business logic instead of models or controllers. To see how it all works, let's take a look at a complete example of a controller with the typical resourceful actions.

Setup

We recommend putting your interactions in app/interactions. It's also very helpful to group them by model. That way you can look in app/interactions/accounts for all the ways you can interact with accounts.

- app/
  - controllers/
    - accounts_controller.rb
  - interactions/
    - accounts/
      - create_account.rb
      - destroy_account.rb
      - find_account.rb
      - list_accounts.rb
      - update_account.rb
  - models/
    - account.rb
  - views/
    - account/
      - edit.html.erb
      - index.html.erb
      - new.html.erb
      - show.html.erb

Controller

Index

# GET /accounts
def index
  @accounts = ListAccounts.run!
end

Since we're not passing any inputs to ListAccounts, it makes sense to use .run! instead of .run. If it failed, that would mean we probably messed up writing the interaction.

class ListAccounts < ActiveInteraction::Base
  def execute
    Account.not_deleted.order(last_name: :asc, first_name: :asc)
  end
end

Show

Up next is the show action. For this one we'll define a helper method to handle raising the correct errors. We have to do this because calling .run! would raise an ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError instead of an ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound. That means Rails would render a 500 instead of a 404.

# GET /accounts/:id
def show
  @account = find_account!
end

private

def find_account!
  outcome = FindAccount.run(params)

  if outcome.valid?
    outcome.result
  else
    fail ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound, outcome.errors.full_messages.to_sentence
  end
end

This probably looks a little different than you're used to. Rails commonly handles this with a before_filter that sets the @account instance variable. Why is all this interaction code better? Two reasons: One, you can reuse the FindAccount interaction in other places, like your API controller or a Resque task. And two, if you want to change how accounts are found, you only have to change one place.

Inside the interaction, we could use #find instead of #find_by_id. That way we wouldn't need the #find_account! helper method in the controller because the error would bubble all the way up. However, you should try to avoid raising errors from interactions. If you do, you'll have to deal with raised exceptions as well as the validity of the outcome.

class FindAccount < ActiveInteraction::Base
  integer :id

  def execute
    account = Account.not_deleted.find_by_id(id)

    if account
      account
    else
      errors.add(:id, 'does not exist')
    end
  end
end

Note that it's perfectly fine to add errors during execution. Not all errors have to come from checking or validation.

New

The new action will be a little different than the ones we've looked at so far. Instead of calling .run or .run!, it's going to initialize a new interaction. This is possible because interactions behave like ActiveModels.

# GET /accounts/new
def new
  @account = CreateAccount.new
end

Since interactions behave like ActiveModels, we can use ActiveModel validations with them. We'll use validations here to make sure that the first and last names are not blank. The validations section goes into more detail about this.

class CreateAccount < ActiveInteraction::Base
  string :first_name, :last_name

  validates :first_name, :last_name,
    presence: true

  def to_model
    Account.new
  end

  def execute
    account = Account.new(inputs)

    unless account.save
      errors.merge!(account.errors)
    end

    account
  end
end

We used a couple of advanced features here. The #to_model method helps determine the correct form to use in the view. Check out the section on forms for more about that. Inside #execute, we merge errors. This is a convenient way to move errors from one object to another. Read more about it in the errors section.

Create

The create action has a lot in common with the new action. Both of them use the CreateAccount interaction. And if creating the account fails, this action falls back to rendering the new action.

# POST /accounts
def create
  outcome = CreateAccount.run(params.fetch(:account, {}))

  if outcome.valid?
    redirect_to(outcome.result)
  else
    @account = outcome
    render(:new)
  end
end

Note that we have to pass a hash to .run. Passing nil is an error.

Since we're using an interaction, we don't need strong parameters. The interaction will ignore any inputs that weren't defined by filters. So you can forget about params.require and params.permit because interactions handle that for you.

Destroy

The destroy action will reuse the #find_account! helper method we wrote earlier.

# DELETE /accounts/:id
def destroy
  DestroyAccount.run!(account: find_account!)
  redirect_to(accounts_url)
end

In this simple example, the destroy interaction doesn't do much. It's not clear that you gain anything by putting it in an interaction. But in the future, when you need to do more than account.destroy, you'll only have to update one spot.

class DestroyAccount < ActiveInteraction::Base
  object :account

  def execute
    account.destroy
  end
end

Edit

Just like the destroy action, editing uses the #find_account! helper. Then it creates a new interaction instance to use as a form object.

# GET /accounts/:id/edit
def edit
  account = find_account!
  @account = UpdateAccount.new(
    account: account,
    first_name: account.first_name,
    last_name: account.last_name)
end

The interaction that updates accounts is more complicated than the others. It requires an account to update, but the other inputs are optional. If they're missing, it'll ignore those attributes. If they're present, it'll update them.

class UpdateAccount < ActiveInteraction::Base
  object :account

  string :first_name, :last_name,
    default: nil

  validates :first_name,
    presence: true,
    unless: -> { first_name.nil? }
  validates :last_name,
    presence: true,
    unless: -> { last_name.nil? }

  def execute
    account.first_name = first_name if first_name.present?
    account.last_name = last_name if last_name.present?

    unless account.save
      errors.merge!(account.errors)
    end

    account
  end
end

Update

Hopefully you've gotten the hang of this by now. We'll use #find_account! to get the account. Then we'll build up the inputs for UpdateAccount. Then we'll run the interaction and either redirect to the updated account or back to the edit page.

# PUT /accounts/:id
def update
  inputs = { account: find_account! }.reverse_merge(params[:account])
  outcome = UpdateAccount.run(inputs)

  if outcome.valid?
    redirect_to(outcome.result)
  else
    @account = outcome
    render(:edit)
  end
end

Advanced usage

Callbacks

ActiveSupport::Callbacks provides a powerful framework for defining callbacks. ActiveInteraction uses that framework to allow hooking into various parts of an interaction's lifecycle.

class Increment < ActiveInteraction::Base
  set_callback :filter, :before, -> { puts 'before filter' }

  integer :x

  set_callback :validate, :after, -> { puts 'after validate' }

  validates :x,
    numericality: { greater_than_or_equal_to: 0 }

  set_callback :execute, :around, lambda { |_interaction, block|
    puts '>>>'
    block.call
    puts '<<<'
  }

  def execute
    puts 'executing'
    x + 1
  end
end

Increment.run!(x: 1)
# before filter
# after validate
# >>>
# executing
# <<<
# => 2

In order, the available callbacks are filter, validate, and execute. You can set before, after, or around on any of them.

Composition

You can run interactions from within other interactions with #compose. If the interaction is successful, it'll return the result (just like if you had called it with .run!). If something went wrong, execution will halt immediately and the errors will be moved onto the caller.

class Add < ActiveInteraction::Base
  integer :x, :y

  def execute
    x + y
  end
end

class AddThree < ActiveInteraction::Base
  integer :x

  def execute
    compose(Add, x: x, y: 3)
  end
end

AddThree.run!(x: 5)
# => 8

To bring in filters from another interaction, use .import_filters. Combined with inputs, delegating to another interaction is a piece of cake.

class AddAndDouble < ActiveInteraction::Base
  import_filters Add

  def execute
    compose(Add, inputs) * 2
  end
end

Note that errors in composed interactions have a few tricky cases. See the errors section for more information about them.

Defaults

The default value for an input can take on many different forms. Setting the default to nil makes the input optional. Setting it to some value makes that the default value for that input. Setting it to a lambda will lazily set the default value for that input. That means the value will be computed when the interaction is run, as opposed to when it is defined.

Lambda defaults are evaluated in the context of the interaction, so you can use the values of other inputs in them.

# This input is optional.
time :a, default: nil
# This input defaults to `Time.at(123)`.
time :b, default: Time.at(123)
# This input lazily defaults to `Time.now`.
time :c, default: -> { Time.now }
# This input defaults to the value of `c` plus 10 seconds.
time :d, default: -> { c + 10 }

Descriptions

Use the desc option to provide human-readable descriptions of filters. You should prefer these to comments because they can be used to generate documentation. The interaction class has a .filters method that returns a hash of filters. Each filter has a #desc method that returns the description.

class Descriptive < ActiveInteraction::Base
  string :first_name,
    desc: 'your first name'
  string :last_name,
    desc: 'your last name'
end

Descriptive.filters.each do |name, filter|
  puts "#{name}: #{filter.desc}"
end
# first_name: your first name
# last_name: your last name

Errors

ActiveInteraction provides detailed errors for easier introspection and testing of errors. Detailed errors improve on regular errors by adding a symbol that represents the type of error that has occurred. Let's look at an example where an item is purchased using a credit card.

class BuyItem < ActiveInteraction::Base
  object :credit_card, :item
  hash :options do
    boolean :gift_wrapped
  end

  def execute
    order = credit_card.purchase(item)
    notify(credit_card.account)
    order
  end

  private def notify(account)
    # ...
  end
end

Having missing or invalid inputs causes the interaction to fail and return errors.

outcome = BuyItem.run(item: 'Thing', options: { gift_wrapped: 'yes' })
outcome.errors.messages
# => {:credit_card=>["is required"], :item=>["is not a valid object"], :"options.gift_wrapped"=>["is not a valid boolean"]}

Determining the type of error based on the string is difficult if not impossible. Calling #details instead of #messages on errors gives you the same list of errors with a testable label representing the error.

outcome.errors.details
# => {:credit_card=>[{:error=>:missing}], :item=>[{:error=>:invalid_type, :type=>"object"}], :"options.gift_wrapped"=>[{:error=>:invalid_type, :type=>"boolean"}]}

Detailed errors can also be manually added during the execute call by passing a symbol to #add instead of a string.

def execute
  errors.add(:monster, :no_passage)
end

ActiveInteraction also supports merging errors. This is useful if you want to delegate validation to some other object. For example, if you have an interaction that updates a record, you might want that record to validate itself. By using the #merge! helper on errors, you can do exactly that.

class UpdateThing < ActiveInteraction::Base
  object :thing

  def execute
    unless thing.save
      errors.merge!(thing.errors)
    end

    thing
  end
end

When a composed interaction fails, its errors are merged onto the caller. This generally produces good error messages, but there are a few cases to look out for.

class Inner < ActiveInteraction::Base
  boolean :x, :y
end

class Outer < ActiveInteraction::Base
  string :x
  boolean :z, default: nil

  def execute
    compose(Inner, x: x, y: z)
  end
end

outcome = Outer.run(x: 'yes')
outcome.errors.details
# => { :x    => [{ :error => :invalid_type, :type => "boolean" }],
#      :base => [{ :error => "Y is required" }] }
outcome.errors.full_messages.join(' and ')
# => "X is not a valid boolean and Y is required"

Since both interactions have an input called x, the inner error for that input is moved to the x error on the outer interaction. This results in a misleading error that claims the input x is not a valid boolean even though it's a string on the outer interaction.

Since only the inner interaction has an input called y, the inner error for that input is moved to the base error on the outer interaction. This results in a confusing error that claims the input y is required even though it's not present on the outer interaction.

Forms

The outcome returned by .run can be used in forms as though it were an ActiveModel object. You can also create a form object by calling .new on the interaction.

Given an application with an Account model we'll create a new Account using the CreateAccount interaction.

# GET /accounts/new
def new
  @account = CreateAccount.new
end

# POST /accounts
def create
  outcome = CreateAccount.run(params.fetch(:account, {}))

  if outcome.valid?
    redirect_to(outcome.result)
  else
    @account = outcome
    render(:new)
  end
end

The form used to create a new Account has slightly more information on the form_for call than you might expect.

<%= form_for @account, as: :account, url: accounts_path do |f| %>
  <%= f.text_field :first_name %>
  <%= f.text_field :last_name %>
  <%= f.submit 'Create' %>
<% end %>

This is necessary because we want the form to act like it is creating a new Account. Defining to_model on the CreateAccount interaction tells the form to treat our interaction like an Account.

class CreateAccount < ActiveInteraction::Base
  # ...

  def to_model
    Account.new
  end
end

Now our form_for call knows how to generate the correct URL and param name (i.e. params[:account]).

# app/views/accounts/new.html.erb
<%= form_for @account do |f| %>
  <%# ... %>
<% end %>

If you have an interaction that updates an Account, you can define to_model to return the object you're updating.

class UpdateAccount < ActiveInteraction::Base
  # ...

  object :account

  def to_model
    account
  end
end

ActiveInteraction also supports formtastic and simple_form. The filters used to define the inputs on your interaction will relay type information to these gems. As a result, form fields will automatically use the appropriate input type.

Shared input options

It can be convenient to apply the same options to a bunch of inputs. One common use case is making many inputs optional. Instead of setting default: nil on each one of them, you can use with_options to reduce duplication.

with_options default: nil do
  date :birthday
  string :name
  boolean :wants_cake
end

Optional inputs

Optional inputs can be defined by using the :default option as described in the filters section. Within the interaction, provided and default values are merged to create inputs. There are times where it is useful to know whether a value was passed to run or the result of a filter default. In particular, it is useful when nil is an acceptable value. For example, you may optionally track your users' birthdays. You can use the inputs.given? predicate to see if an input was even passed to run. With inputs.given? you can also check the input of a hash or array filter by passing a series of keys or indexes to check.

class UpdateUser < ActiveInteraction::Base
  object :user
  date :birthday,
    default: nil

  def execute
    user.birthday = birthday if inputs.given?(:birthday)
    errors.merge!(user.errors) unless user.save
    user
  end
end

Now you have a few options. If you don't want to update their birthday, leave it out of the hash. If you want to remove their birthday, set birthday: nil. And if you want to update it, pass in the new value as usual.

user = User.find(...)

# Don't update their birthday.
UpdateUser.run!(user: user)

# Remove their birthday.
UpdateUser.run!(user: user, birthday: nil)

# Update their birthday.
UpdateUser.run!(user: user, birthday: Date.new(2000, 1, 2))

Translations

ActiveInteraction is i18n aware out of the box! All you have to do is add translations to your project. In Rails, these typically go into config/locales. For example, let's say that for some reason you want to print everything out backwards. Simply add translations for ActiveInteraction to your hsilgne locale.

# config/locales/hsilgne.yml
hsilgne:
  active_interaction:
    types:
      array: yarra
      boolean: naeloob
      date: etad
      date_time: emit etad
      decimal: lamiced
      file: elif
      float: taolf
      hash: hsah
      integer: regetni
      interface: ecafretni
      object: tcejbo
      string: gnirts
      symbol: lobmys
      time: emit
    errors:
      messages:
        invalid: dilavni si
        invalid_type: '%{type} dilav a ton si'
        missing: deriuqer si

Then set your locale and run interactions like normal.

class I18nInteraction < ActiveInteraction::Base
  string :name
end

I18nInteraction.run(name: false).errors.messages[:name]
# => ["is not a valid string"]

I18n.locale = :hsilgne
I18nInteraction.run(name: false).errors.messages[:name]
# => ["gnirts dilav a ton si"]

Everything else works like an activerecord entry. For example, to rename an attribute you can use attributes.

Here we'll rename the num attribute on an interaction named product:

en:
  active_interaction:
    attributes:
      product:
        num: 'Number'

Credits

ActiveInteraction is brought to you by Aaron Lasseigne. Along with Aaron, Taylor Fausak helped create and maintain ActiveInteraction but has since moved on.

If you want to contribute to ActiveInteraction, please read our contribution guidelines. A complete list of contributors is available on GitHub.

ActiveInteraction is licensed under the MIT License.


Author: AaronLasseigne
Source code: https://github.com/AaronLasseigne/active_interaction
License: MIT license

#ruby