Why we use Laravel & Wink

Why we use Laravel & Wink

There are so many options when choosing the technology for your website and content management system. We explain why we believe Laravel with Wink is a great choice.

Introduction

We have a new project from a new customer. We’ve gathered their requirements and agreed on the scope. Now is the time to get on with the technical tasks. One of the first of these is to choose the technology that will run the site.

Anyone familiar with SEO will know that content is king. Regularly updating and adding new content to your website is critical to keep it relevant to Google and other search engines.

We’re aware that creating and adding new content often becomes a low priority task in a busy company if using the content management system (CMS) is complicated and time consuming. To keep this extremely important task high up the priority list, the process needs to be as quick and simple as possible.

So we know what we want… a simple to use, fully customisable CMS that runs on fast and proven technology.

Ticking each of those boxes is not as common as you might think. That is one of many reasons why we are big fans of using Laravel with Wink (check out our Wink beginner’s guide for more information). That combination ticks all of those boxes.

In this article we’re going to look at a number of technical and non-technical reasons why Wink is often the best choice of CMS.

Technical reasons

Wink is installed by simply requiring it with composer within a Laravel project. This creates all the views, DB migrations and controllers for the back end admin side.

By default, after the composer install, Wink is pre-configured to run on a separate DB connection to the rest of site if required.

This means Wink will work with new or existing Laravel projects, and won’t interfere with your existing install.

Wink (and the Laravel framework) is lightweight and fast. Whilst purely using lines of code is not a reliable comparison in isolation, the following is still very significant and frankly quite shocking…

Laravel + Wink = 3,797 lines of PHP code (made up of 2,258 + 1,539 respectively)> Laravel + Wink = 3,797 lines of PHP code (made up of 2,258 + 1,539 respectively)
As we just said, lines of code is normally not enough to fairly compare two setups. However, when the ratio is 1 line of code in Laravel + Wink to 100 lines in Wordpress it becomes more reliable.

Wink does not currently provide front end views. That means that the front end of Wink is entirely up to the customer and designer. You can build and customise your blog page and individual post pages to suit your requirements.

Wink has meta fields available in the page editor. This allows users to easily populate custom meta data, Twitter meta data and Open Graph (og) data on their pages and posts. This improves SEO and enables the correct formatting of links shared on social networks.

There is full support for images within Wink. There’s a simple image uploader accessed via the bubble menu in the editor. By default it adds uploaded images to public/wink/images. Featured images can also be uploaded and set from the main menu in the editor.

Wink has built in support for tags and authors. Tagging your articles is important to help your website visitors find what they are looking for. Tags and author details give you your core filtering options for the blog page (filter by tag, author, date).

Non-technical reasons

One of the main reasons (possibly even ***the ***main reason) is that Wink is easy to use. You can create articles quickly, with the minimum of fuss. There are no complicated menus or settings to get in the way of creating content.

The default editor is intuitive and simple. The look and feel gives more than just a nod towards Medium. Users of Medium will find it very familiar. Users who are not familiar with Medium will still get to grips with it quickly… creating and formatting articles with ease. After all, Medium have spent many years creating an easy-to-use blogging interface so following their formula is a great idea.

Wink allows draft versions of articles . If you haven’t got time to write, edit and format your article in one go that’s fine. You needn’t write your article elsewhere then paste it into your CMS. You can start an article, do something else then come back to it later. You then can publish it when you’re ready or even schedule it for later.

As we mentioned in the technical section, Wink handles images really well. They can be added and aligned really simply whilst writing your post. You can also choose your featured image quickly and easily too.

If you have several content creators in your organisation Wink can handle that easily. Wink supports multiple authors with individual logins so you can add as many people as you like. This means you can get everyone to chip in occasionally!

Conclusion

We hope this is a useful summary of why we’re big fans of the Laravel + Wink combination.

It provides our customers with great looking, fast websites which they can quickly and easily update themselves no matter their level of technical expertise.

It’s a great (and we would argue better) alternative to more familiar tools such as WordPress.

Further reading:

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial - Datatables Individual Column Searching using Ajax

Image Upload Tutorial with Laravel

How to remove multiple keys from PHP Array?

Laravel Web Tinker

Learn how to create your first Laravel package

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial - Datatables Dropdown Filter Server-side using Ajax

How to Install Laravel Local Dev Environment On Ubuntu

Laravel Eager Loading Tutorial

Introduction

We have a new project from a new customer. We’ve gathered their requirements and agreed on the scope. Now is the time to get on with the technical tasks. One of the first of these is to choose the technology that will run the site.

Anyone familiar with SEO will know that content is king. Regularly updating and adding new content to your website is critical to keep it relevant to Google and other search engines.

We’re aware that creating and adding new content often becomes a low priority task in a busy company if using the content management system (CMS) is complicated and time consuming. To keep this extremely important task high up the priority list, the process needs to be as quick and simple as possible.

So we know what we want… a simple to use, fully customisable CMS that runs on fast and proven technology.

Ticking each of those boxes is not as common as you might think. That is one of many reasons why we are big fans of using Laravel with Wink (check out our Wink beginner’s guide for more information). That combination ticks all of those boxes.

In this article we’re going to look at a number of technical and non-technical reasons why Wink is often the best choice of CMS.

Technical reasons

Wink is installed by simply requiring it with composer within a Laravel project. This creates all the views, DB migrations and controllers for the back end admin side.

By default, after the composer install, Wink is pre-configured to run on a separate DB connection to the rest of site if required.

This means Wink will work with new or existing Laravel projects, and won’t interfere with your existing install.

Wink (and the Laravel framework) is lightweight and fast. Whilst purely using lines of code is not a reliable comparison in isolation, the following is still very significant and frankly quite shocking…

Laravel + Wink = 3,797 lines of PHP code (made up of 2,258 + 1,539 respectively)> Laravel + Wink = 3,797 lines of PHP code (made up of 2,258 + 1,539 respectively)
As we just said, lines of code is normally not enough to fairly compare two setups. However, when the ratio is 1 line of code in Laravel + Wink to 100 lines in Wordpress it becomes more reliable.

Wink does not currently provide front end views. That means that the front end of Wink is entirely up to the customer and designer. You can build and customise your blog page and individual post pages to suit your requirements.

Wink has meta fields available in the page editor. This allows users to easily populate custom meta data, Twitter meta data and Open Graph (og) data on their pages and posts. This improves SEO and enables the correct formatting of links shared on social networks.

There is full support for images within Wink. There’s a simple image uploader accessed via the bubble menu in the editor. By default it adds uploaded images to public/wink/images. Featured images can also be uploaded and set from the main menu in the editor.

Wink has built in support for tags and authors. Tagging your articles is important to help your website visitors find what they are looking for. Tags and author details give you your core filtering options for the blog page (filter by tag, author, date).

Non-technical reasons

One of the main reasons (possibly even ***the ***main reason) is that Wink is easy to use. You can create articles quickly, with the minimum of fuss. There are no complicated menus or settings to get in the way of creating content.

The default editor is intuitive and simple. The look and feel gives more than just a nod towards Medium. Users of Medium will find it very familiar. Users who are not familiar with Medium will still get to grips with it quickly… creating and formatting articles with ease. After all, Medium have spent many years creating an easy-to-use blogging interface so following their formula is a great idea.

Wink allows draft versions of articles . If you haven’t got time to write, edit and format your article in one go that’s fine. You needn’t write your article elsewhere then paste it into your CMS. You can start an article, do something else then come back to it later. You then can publish it when you’re ready or even schedule it for later.

As we mentioned in the technical section, Wink handles images really well. They can be added and aligned really simply whilst writing your post. You can also choose your featured image quickly and easily too.

If you have several content creators in your organisation Wink can handle that easily. Wink supports multiple authors with individual logins so you can add as many people as you like. This means you can get everyone to chip in occasionally!

Conclusion

We hope this is a useful summary of why we’re big fans of the Laravel + Wink combination.

It provides our customers with great looking, fast websites which they can quickly and easily update themselves no matter their level of technical expertise.

It’s a great (and we would argue better) alternative to more familiar tools such as WordPress.

Further reading:

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial - Datatables Individual Column Searching using Ajax

Image Upload Tutorial with Laravel

How to remove multiple keys from PHP Array?

Laravel Web Tinker

Learn how to create your first Laravel package

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial - Datatables Dropdown Filter Server-side using Ajax

How to Install Laravel Local Dev Environment On Ubuntu

Laravel Eager Loading Tutorial

PHP Interview Questions with Solutions: Prepare for PHP Interview

PHP Interview Questions with Solutions: Prepare for PHP Interview

Prepare for PHP Interviews. Set Variable With php.ini File. Logic & Output Behind PHP Code Segment. Class Concept, Error & Functions in PHP. Start PHP Now!

Description
In this course you will be introduced with some tricky questions that everyone face during their interview. In each solutions I have included some useful functions which we generally use at the time of development also. I have covered the following area in my course with Questions, Attractive Presentations and Practical Solutions that will help you to understand the logic behind PHP in a different way.

Some useful functions
PHP error types
Class concept
Access specifiers public, private and protected
Set variable with php.ini file
Operators introduced in PHP7
Logic and its output behind some code segment
Basic knowledge
PHP7, XAMPP Server, Notepad++
What will you learn
This course is build for the person who is facing interviews. Every question is well explained with the practical solution through videos. So that everybody can prepare themselves for the tricky questions asked during interviews
To continue:

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial: Build your First CRUD App with Laravel and MySQL (PHP 7.1+)

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial: Build your First CRUD App with Laravel and MySQL (PHP 7.1+)

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial: Build your First CRUD App with Laravel and MySQL (PHP 7.1+)

Originally published at techiediaries.com on 12 Mar 2019

Throughout this tutorial for beginners you'll learn to use Laravel 5.8 - the latest version of one of the most popular PHP frameworks - to create a CRUD web application with a MySQL database from scratch and step by step starting with the installation of Composer (PHP package manager) to implementing and serving your application.

Note: Laravel 5.8 is recently released and this tutorial is upgraded to the latest version.
Also read: Laravel 5.8 REST CRUD API Tutorial - Build a CRM [PART 1]: Eloquent Models and Relationships
Laravel 5.8 New Features

Let's start our tutorial by going through the most important features introduced in this version.

  • The hasOneThrough Eloquent relationship.
  • Better email validation,
  • Auto-Discovery Of Model Policies provided that the model and policy follow standard Laravel naming conventions
  • DynamoDB cache and session drivers,
  • Added support for PHPUnit 8.0 for unit testing,
  • Added support for Carbon 2.0, an easy to use PHP API extension for DateTime,
  • Added support Pheanstalk 4.0: a pure PHP 5.3+ client for the beanstalkd workqueue, etc.

The Laravel 5.8 version has also corrected numeroous bugs and introduced many improvements of the Artisan CLI.

Check out the official docs for details features of Laravel 5.8

Prerequisites

This tutorial assumes you have PHP and MySQL installed on your system. Follow the instructions for your operating system to install both of them.

You also need to be familiar with Linux/macOS bash where we'll be executing the commands in this tutorial.

Familiarly with PHP is required since Laravel is based on PHP.

For development I will be using a Ubuntu 16.04 machine so the commands in this tutorial are targeting this system but you should be able to follow this tutorial in any operating system you use.

Installing PHP 7.1

Laravel v5.8 requires PHP 7.1 or above so you need the latest version of PHP installed on your system. The process is straightforward on most systems.

On Ubuntu, you can follow these instructions.

First add the ondrej/php PPA which contains the latest version of PHP:

$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ondrej/php
$ sudo apt-get update

Next, install PHP 7.1 using the following command:

$ sudo apt-get install php7.1

If you are using Ubuntu 18.04, PHP 7.2 is included in the default Ubuntu repository for 18.04 so you should be able to install it using the following command:

$ sudo apt-get install php
This tutorial is tested with PHP 7.1 but you can also use more recent versions like PHP 7.2 or PHP 7.3

Installing the Required PHP 7.1 Modules

Laravel requires a bunch of modules. You can install them using the following command:

$ sudo apt-get install php7.1 php7.1-cli php7.1-common php7.1-json php7.1-opcache php7.1-mysql php7.1-mbstring php7.1-mcrypt php7.1-zip php7.1-fpm php7.1-xml
Installing PHP Composer

Let's start our journey by install Composer, The PHP package manager.

Navigate in your home directory, then download the installer from the official website using curl:

$ cd ~
$ curl -sS https://getcomposer.org/installer -o composer-setup.php

You can then install composer globally on your system by using the following command:

$ sudo php composer-setup.php --install-dir=/usr/local/bin --filename=composer

As of this writing Composer 1.8 will be installed on your system. You can make sure your installation works as expected by running composer in your terminal:

$ composer

You should get the following output:

   ______
  / ____/___  ____ ___  ____  ____  ________  _____
 / /   / __ \/ __ `__ \/ __ \/ __ \/ ___/ _ \/ ___/
/ /___/ /_/ / / / / / / /_/ / /_/ (__  )  __/ /
\____/\____/_/ /_/ /_/ .___/\____/____/\___/_/
                    /_/
Composer version 1.8.0 2018-12-03 10:31:16

Usage:
command [options] [arguments]

Options:
-h, --help Display this help message
-q, --quiet Do not output any message
-V, --version Display this application version
--ansi Force ANSI output
--no-ansi Disable ANSI output
-n, --no-interaction Do not ask any interactive question
--profile Display timing and memory usage information
--no-plugins Whether to disable plugins.
-d, --working-dir=WORKING-DIR If specified, use the given directory as working directory.
-v|vv|vvv, --verbose Increase the verbosity of messages: 1 for normal output, 2 for more verbose output and 3 for debug

For more information check out this tutorial.

If you've successfully installed Composer in your system, you are ready to create a Laravel 5.8 project.

Installing and Creating a Laravel 5.8 Project

In this section we'll introduce Laravel and then proceed it to install and create a Laravel 5.8 project.

About Laravel

Laravel docs describe it as:

Laravel is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. We believe development must be an enjoyable and creative experience to be truly fulfilling. Laravel attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as:
  • Simple, fast routing engine.
  • Powerful dependency injection container.
  • Multiple back-ends for session and cache storage.
  • Expressive, intuitive database ORM.
  • Database agnostic schema migrations.
  • Robust background job processing.
  • Real-time event broadcasting.
Laravel is accessible, yet powerful, providing tools needed for large, robust applications.

Generating a Laravel 5.8 project is easy and straightforward. In your terminal, run the following command:

$ composer create-project  --prefer-dist  laravel/laravel laravel-first-crud-app

This will install laravel/laravel v5.8.3.

Note: Make sure you have PHP 7.1 installed on your system. Otherwise, composer will use Laravel 5.5 for your project.

You can verify the installed version in your project using:

$ cd laravel-first-crud-app
$ php artisan -V
Laravel Framework 5.8.19
Installing the Front-End Dependencies

In your generated project, you can see that a package.json file is generated which includes many front-end libraries that can be used by your project:

  • axios,
  • bootstrap,
  • cross-env,
  • jquery,
  • laravel-mix,
  • lodash,
  • popper.js,
  • resolve-url-loader,
  • sass,
  • sass-loader,
  • vue.
Note: You can use your preferred libraries with Laravel not specifically the ones added to package.json.
The package.json file in your Laravel project includes a few packages such as vue and axios to help you get started building your JavaScript application.
It also includes bootstrap to help you get started with Bootstrap for styling your UI.
It include Laravel Mix to help you compile your SASS files to plain CSS.

You need to use npm to install the front-end dependencies:

$ npm install

After running this command a node_modules folder will be created and the dependencies will be installed into it.

Note: You need to have Node.js and npm installed on your system before you can install the front-end dependencies.
Creating a MySQL Database

Let's now create a MySQL database that we'll use to persist dat ain our Laravel application. In your terminal, run the following command to run the mysql client:

$ mysql -u root -p

When prompted, enter the password for your MySQL server when you've installed it.

Next, run the following SQL statement to create a db database:

mysql> create database db;

Open the .env file and update the credentials to access your MySQL database:

DB_CONNECTION=mysql
DB_HOST=127.0.0.1
DB_PORT=3306
DB_DATABASE=db
DB_USERNAME=root
DB_PASSWORD=******

You need to enter the database name, the username and password.

At this point, you can run the migrate command to create your database and a bunch of SQL tables needed by Laravel:

$ php artisan migrate
Note: You can run the migrate command at any other points of your development to add other SQL tables in your database or to later your database if you need to add any changes later.
Creating your First Laravel Model

Laravel uses the MVC architectural pattern to organize your application in three decoupled parts:

  • The Model which encapsulates the data access layer,
  • The View which encapsulates the representation layer,
  • Controller which encapsulates the code to control the application and communicates with the model and view layers.

Wikipedia defines MVC as:

Model–view–controller is an architectural pattern commonly used for developing user interfacesthat divides an application into three interconnected parts. This is done to separate internal representations of information from the ways information is presented to and accepted from the user.

Now, let's create our first Laravel Model. In your terminal, run the following command:

$ php artisan make:model Contact --migration

This will create a Contact model and a migration file. In the terminal, we get an output similar to:

Model created successfully.
Created Migration: 2019_01_27_193840_create_contacts_table

Open the database/migrations/xxxxxx_create_contacts_table migration file and update it accordingly:

<?php

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Illuminate\Database\Migrations\Migration;

class CreateContactsTable extends Migration
{
/**
* Run the migrations.
*
* @return void
*/
public function up()
{
Schema::create('contacts', function (Blueprint $table) {
$table->increments('id');
$table->timestamps();
$table->string('first_name');
$table->string('last_name');
$table->string('email');
$table->string('job_title');
$table->string('city');
$table->string('country');
});
}

/**
 * Reverse the migrations.
 *
 * @return void
 */
public function down()
{
    Schema::dropIfExists('contacts');
}

}

We added the first_namelast_nameemailjob_titlecity and country fields in the contacts table.

You can now create the contacts table in the database using the following command:

$ php artisan migrate

Now, let's look at our Contact model, which will be used to interact with the contacts database table. Open the app/Contact.php and update it:

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Contact extends Model
{
protected $fillable = [
'first_name',
'last_name',
'email',
'city',
'country',
'job_title'
];
}

Creating the Controller and Routes

After creating the model and migrated our database. Let's now create the controller and the routes for working with the Contact model. In your terminal, run the following command:

$ php artisan make:controller ContactController --resource
Laravel resource routing assigns the typical "CRUD" routes to a controller with a single line of code. For example, you may wish to create a controller that handles all HTTP requests for "photos" stored by your application. Using the make:controller Artisan command, we can quickly create such a controller:
This command will generate a controller at app/Http/Controllers/PhotoController.php. The controller will contain a method for each of the available resource operations.

Open the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file. This is the initial content:

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use Illuminate\Http\Request;

class ContactController extends Controller
{
/**
* Display a listing of the resource.
*
* @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
*/
public function index()
{
//
}

/**
 * Show the form for creating a new resource.
 *
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function create()
{
    //
}

/**
 * Store a newly created resource in storage.
 *
 * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function store(Request $request)
{
    //
}

/**
 * Display the specified resource.
 *
 * @param  int  $id
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function show($id)
{
    //
}

/**
 * Show the form for editing the specified resource.
 *
 * @param  int  $id
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function edit($id)
{
    //
}

/**
 * Update the specified resource in storage.
 *
 * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
 * @param  int  $id
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function update(Request $request, $id)
{
    //
}

/**
 * Remove the specified resource from storage.
 *
 * @param  int  $id
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function destroy($id)
{
    //
}

}

The ContactController class extends Controller class available from Laravel and defines a bunch of methods which will be used to do the CRUD operations against the Contact model.

You can read the role of the method on the comment above it.

Now we need to provide implementations for these methods.

But before that, let's add routing. Open the routes/web.php file and update it accordingly:

<?php
Route::get('/', function () {
return view('welcome');
});

Route::resource('contacts', 'ContactController');

Using the resource() static method of Route, you can create multiple routes to expose multiple actions on the resource.

These routes are mapped to various ContactController methods which will need to implement in the next section:

  • GET/contacts, mapped to the index() method,
  • GET /contacts/create, mapped to the create() method,
  • POST /contacts, mapped to the store() method,
  • GET /contacts/{contact}, mapped to the show() method,
  • GET /contacts/{contact}/edit, mapped to the edit() method,
  • PUT/PATCH /contacts/{contact}, mapped to the update() method,
  • DELETE /contacts/{contact}, mapped to the destroy() method.

These routes are used to serve HTML templates and also as API endpoints for working with the Contactmodel.

Note: If you want to create a controller that will only expose a RESTful API, you can use the apiResource method to exclude the routes that are used to serve the HTML templates:
Route::apiResource('contacts', 'ContactController');
Implementing the CRUD Operations

Let's now implement the controller methods alongside the views.

C: Implementing the Create Operation and Adding a Form

The ContactController includes the store() method that maps to the POST /contacts API endpoint which will be used to create a contact in the database and the create() that maps to the GET /contacts/create route which will be used to serve the HTML form used to submit the contact to POST /contacts API endpoint.

Let's implement these two methods.

Re-open the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file and start by importing the Contactmodel:

use App\Contact;

Next, locate the store() method and update it accordingly:

    public function store(Request $request)
{
$request->validate([
'first_name'=>'required',
'last_name'=>'required',
'email'=>'required'
]);

    $contact = new Contact([
        'first_name' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('first_name'),
        'last_name' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('last_name'),
        'email' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('email'),
        'job_title' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('job_title'),
        'city' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('city'),
        'country' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('country')
    ]);
    $contact-&gt;save();
    return redirect('/contacts')-&gt;with('success', 'Contact saved!');
}

Next, locate the create() method and update it:

    public function create()
{
return view('contacts.create');
}

The create() function makes use of the view() method to return the create.blade.php template which needs to be present in the resources/views folder.

Before creating the create.blade.php template we need to create a base template that will be extended by the create template and all the other templates that will create later in this tutorial.

In the resources/views folder, create a base.blade.php file:

$ cd resources/views
$ touch base.blade.php

Open the resources/views/base.blade.php file and add the following blade template:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
<title>Laravel 5.8 & MySQL CRUD Tutorial</title>
<link href="{{ asset('css/app.css') }}" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
</head>
<body>
<div class="container">
@yield('main')
</div>
<script src="{{ asset('js/app.js') }}" type="text/js"></script>
</body>
</html>

Now, let's create the create.blade.php template. First, create a contacts folder in the views folder:

$ mkdir contacts

Next, create the template

$ cd contacts
$ touch create.blade.php

Open the resources/views/contacts/create.blade.php file and add the following code:

@extends('base')

@section('main')
<div class="row">
<div class="col-sm-8 offset-sm-2">
<h1 class="display-3">Add a contact</h1>
<div>
@if ($errors->any())
<div class="alert alert-danger">
<ul>
@foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
<li>{{ $error }}</li>
@endforeach
</ul>
</div><br />
@endif
<form method="post" action="{{ route('contacts.store') }}">
@csrf
<div class="form-group">
<label for="first_name">First Name:</label>
<input type="text" class="form-control" name="first_name"/>
</div>

      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="last_name"&gt;Last Name:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="last_name"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;

      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="email"&gt;Email:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="email"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;
      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="city"&gt;City:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="city"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;
      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="country"&gt;Country:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="country"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;
      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="job_title"&gt;Job Title:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="job_title"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;                         
      &lt;button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary-outline"&gt;Add contact&lt;/button&gt;
  &lt;/form&gt;

</div>
</div>
</div>
@endsection

This is a screenshot of our create form!

Fill out the form and click on the Add contact button to create a contact in the database. You should be redirected to /contacts route which doesn't have a view associated to it yet.

R: Implementing the Read Operation and Getting Data

Next, let's implement the read operation to get and display contacts data from our MySQL database.

Go to the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file, locate the index() method and update it:

    public function index()
{
$contacts = Contact::all();

    return view('contacts.index', compact('contacts'));
}

Next, you need to create the the index template. Create a resources/views/contacts.index.blade.phpfile:

$ touch index.blade.php

Open the resources/views/contacts/index.blade.php file and add the following code:

@extends('base')

@section('main')
<div class="row">
<div class="col-sm-12">
<h1 class="display-3">Contacts</h1>
<table class="table table-striped">
<thead>
<tr>
<td>ID</td>
<td>Name</td>
<td>Email</td>
<td>Job Title</td>
<td>City</td>
<td>Country</td>
<td colspan = 2>Actions</td>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
@foreach($contacts as $contact)
<tr>
<td>{{$contact->id}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->first_name}} {{$contact->last_name}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->email}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->job_title}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->city}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->country}}</td>
<td>
<a href="{{ route('contacts.edit',$contact->id)}}" class="btn btn-primary">Edit</a>
</td>
<td>
<form action="{{ route('contacts.destroy', $contact->id)}}" method="post">
@csrf
@method('DELETE')
<button class="btn btn-danger" type="submit">Delete</button>
</form>
</td>
</tr>
@endforeach
</tbody>
</table>
<div>
</div>
@endsection

U: Implementing the Update Operation

Next, we need to implement the update operation. Go to the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file, locate the edit($id) method and update it:

    public function edit($id)
{
$contact = Contact::find($id);
return view('contacts.edit', compact('contact'));
}

Next, you need to implement the update() method:

    public function update(Request $request, $id)
{
$request->validate([
'first_name'=>'required',
'last_name'=>'required',
'email'=>'required'
]);

    $contact = Contact::find($id);
    $contact-&gt;first_name =  $request-&gt;get('first_name');
    $contact-&gt;last_name = $request-&gt;get('last_name');
    $contact-&gt;email = $request-&gt;get('email');
    $contact-&gt;job_title = $request-&gt;get('job_title');
    $contact-&gt;city = $request-&gt;get('city');
    $contact-&gt;country = $request-&gt;get('country');
    $contact-&gt;save();

    return redirect('/contacts')-&gt;with('success', 'Contact updated!');
}

Now, you need to add the edit template. Inside the resources/views/contacts/, create an edit.blade.php file:

$ touch edit.blade.php

Open the resources/views/contacts/edit.blade.php file and add this code:

@extends('base')
@section('main')
<div class="row">
<div class="col-sm-8 offset-sm-2">
<h1 class="display-3">Update a contact</h1>

    @if ($errors-&gt;any())
    &lt;div class="alert alert-danger"&gt;
        &lt;ul&gt;
            @foreach ($errors-&gt;all() as $error)
            &lt;li&gt;{{ $error }}&lt;/li&gt;
            @endforeach
        &lt;/ul&gt;
    &lt;/div&gt;
    &lt;br /&gt; 
    @endif
    &lt;form method="post" action="{{ route('contacts.update', $contact-&gt;id) }}"&gt;
        @method('PATCH') 
        @csrf
        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;

            &lt;label for="first_name"&gt;First Name:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="first_name" value={{ $contact-&gt;first_name }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;

        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="last_name"&gt;Last Name:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="last_name" value={{ $contact-&gt;last_name }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;

        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="email"&gt;Email:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="email" value={{ $contact-&gt;email }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;
        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="city"&gt;City:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="city" value={{ $contact-&gt;city }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;
        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="country"&gt;Country:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="country" value={{ $contact-&gt;country }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;
        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="job_title"&gt;Job Title:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="job_title" value={{ $contact-&gt;job_title }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;
        &lt;button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary"&gt;Update&lt;/button&gt;
    &lt;/form&gt;
&lt;/div&gt;

</div>
@endsection

U: Implementing the Delete Operation

Finally, we'll proceed to implement the delete operation. Go to the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file, locate the destroy() method and update it accordingly:

    public function destroy($id)
{
$contact = Contact::find($id);
$contact->delete();

    return redirect('/contacts')-&gt;with('success', 'Contact deleted!');
}

You can notice that when we redirect to the /contacts route in our CRUD API methods, we also pass a success message but it doesn't appear in our index template. Let's change that!

Go to the resources/views/contacts/index.blade.php file and add the following code:

<div class="col-sm-12">

@if(session()->get('success'))
<div class="alert alert-success">
{{ session()->get('success') }}
</div>
@endif
</div>

We also need to add a button to takes us to the create form. Add this code below the header:

    <div>
<a style="margin: 19px;" href="{{ route('contacts.create')}}" class="btn btn-primary">New contact</a>
</div>

This is a screenshot of the page after we created a contact:

Conclusion

We've reached the end of this tutorial. We created a CRUD application with Laravel 5.8, PHP 7.1 and MySQL.

Hope you enjoyed the tutorial and see you in the next one!


Originally published at techiediaries.com on 12 Mar 2019

=====================================

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PHP variable to JavaScript In Laravel

PHP variable to JavaScript In Laravel

In PHP, there is always a limitation on pass PHP variable to the javascript file. Many PHP developers, face this issue. But Laravel has one package which is directly set the variable in js. So, you can use this package for passing a variable from controller to javascript.

In PHP, there is always a limitation on pass PHP variable to the javascript file. Many PHP developers, face this issue. But Laravel has one package which is directly set the variable in js. So, you can use this package for passing a variable from controller to javascript.

However, we know the Laravel framework is having the largest community. Similarly, Laravel having large package base. So, sometimes it is easy to use package rather use custom code. Moreover, you can use existing packages.

Pass PHP variable to JavaScript

Many times you often find the need to pass PHP variable or string to the javascript file. But for this, you can use the below package.

Install package

Just copy below package and paste into the composer.json file.

"laracasts/utilities": "^2.1"

Or similarly from command line or terminal run command:

composer require laracasts/utilities

Provider

Further, add the Service provider into the config/app.php file. Which is used for the binding. After this, you will get Javascript facade.

'providers' => [
    '...',
    'Laracasts\Utilities\JavaScript\JavaScriptServiceProvider'
];

Publish the Configuration:

Finally, publish the config using the below command.

php artisan vendor:publish --provider="Laracasts\Utilities\JavaScript\JavaScriptServiceProvider"

Further, it will copy the javascript.js file to the config folder. There are two variable you can assign the values. Firstly, you can set bind_js_vars_to_this_view. This will set the name of the view. Basically, this is a partial view. If more than one view then you can set in array. Secondly, js_namespace is where you can define the namespace of the js variable. By default, Laracasts is the variable but you can change it to something else.

Usage in controller

Import the Dependency

You can initialize the JavaScript variable in the controller. Initialize and import into the controller.

use Javascript;

Set Variable

Now, you can define the variable into the controller using Javascript. You can set the values in the key-value pair. Assign a value to the key.

$array = [
    'key' => value_here,
];
 
JavaScript::put($array);

So, put your value into the JavaScript variable using the value of an array. Once you define into the array and assign to the variable you can access it into the js file.

Now, your controller will look like below.

<?php
namespace App\Http\Controllers;
 
use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use JavaScript;
 
class VarController extends Controller
{
 
 
    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function index()
    {
        \JavaScript::put([
            'foo' => 'bar',
            'user' => 'user',
            'time' => '2019-04-29'
        ]);
        return view('pages/home');
    }
}

Access In JS file

Now, your blade file will look like below.

@extends('layouts.default')
@section('content')
    <div style="text-align:center">
        <h1>PHP var to JavaScript</h1>
         
    </div>
     
@stop
@section('scripts')
<script src='assets/app.js'></script>
@stop

In js file, you can access the set variable into the Laracasts namespace. Which you define in the javascript.js file.

console.log(Laracasts.foo); // access foo variable
console.log(Laracasts.user);// access user variable
console.log(Laracasts.time);// access time variable

In this way, you can directly access the set variable. This will give simple access for getting value into the js file. There is a limitation for getting the value into the js file. So this package will give you direct access into js file.

In many cases, this will give you the simplest solution. Many developers have to face this problem in developement. So, this post will give some relief from this problem. Let me know if you face any issue.

Thanks For Visiting, Keep Visiting. If you liked this post, share it with all of your programming buddies!