Amazon EKS Distro: The Kubernetes Distribution Used by Amazon EKS

Amazon EKS Distro: The Kubernetes Distribution Used by Amazon EKS

Our customers have told us that they want to focus on building innovative solutions for their customers, and focus less on the heavy lifting of managing Kubernetes infrastructure. That is why Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) has been so popular; we remove the burden of managing Kubernetes while our customers glean the benefits. However, not […]

Our customers have told us that they want to focus on building innovative solutions for their customers, and focus less on the heavy lifting of managing Kubernetes infrastructure. That is why Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) has been so popular; we remove the burden of managing Kubernetes while our customers glean the benefits.

However, not all customers choose to use Amazon EKS. For example, they may have existing infrastructure investments, data residency requirements or compliance obligations that lead them to operate Kubernetes on-premises. Customers in these situations tell us that they spend a lot of effort to track updates, figure out compatible versions of Kubernetes and the complicated matrix of underlying components, test them for compatibility, and keep pace with the Kubernetes release cadence, which can be as frequent as every three to four months. If customers are not able to maintain pace for testing and qualifying new versions, they risk breaking changes, version compatibility issues, and running unsupported versions of Kubernetes lacking critical security patches.

We have learned a lot while providing Amazon EKS at AWS and have developed a deep understanding of how to deliver Kubernetes with operational security, stability, and reliability. Today we are sharing Amazon EKS Distro, which we built using that knowledge.

EKS Distro is a distribution of the same version of Kubernetes deployed by Amazon EKS, which you can use to manually create your own Kubernetes clusters anywhere you choose. EKS Distro provides the installable builds and code of open source Kubernetes used by Amazon EKS, including the dependencies and AWS-maintained patches. Using a choice of cluster creation and management tooling, you can create EKS Distro clusters in AWS on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), in other clouds, and on your on-premises hardware.

amazon elastic kubernetes service announcements aws re:invent open source

Bootstrap 5 Complete Course with Examples

Bootstrap 5 Tutorial - Bootstrap 5 Crash Course for Beginners

Nest.JS Tutorial for Beginners

Hello Vue 3: A First Look at Vue 3 and the Composition API

Building a simple Applications with Vue 3

Deno Crash Course: Explore Deno and Create a full REST API with Deno

How to Build a Real-time Chat App with Deno and WebSockets

Convert HTML to Markdown Online

HTML entity encoder decoder Online

50+ Useful Kubernetes Tools for 2020 - Part 2

Our original Kubernetes tool list was so popular that we've curated another great list of tools to help you improve your functionality with the platform.

AWS Fargate for Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service | Caylent

Easily run Kubernetes-based applications on AWS by leveraging AWS Fargate and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service together. Learn more here.

Did Google Open Sourcing Kubernetes Backfired?

With Google not owning the trademarks or control for Kubernetes, it also provided a competitive edge to AWS, Microsoft, IBM etc.

New – Amazon EMR on Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS)

Tens of thousands of customers use Amazon EMR to run big data analytics applications on frameworks such as Apache Spark, Hive, HBase, Flink, Hudi, and Presto at scale. EMR automates the provisioning and scaling of these frameworks and optimizes performance with a wide range of EC2 instance types to meet price and performance requirements. Customer […]

AWS Fargate for Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service

AWS Fargate is a native serverless offering for EKS that makes maintaining and managing Kubernetes clusters and pod easier than ever. On-demand cloud computing brings new ways to ensure scalability and efficiency. Rather than pre-allocating and managing certain server resources or having to go through the usual process of setting up a cloud cluster, apps and microservices can now rely on on-demand serverless computing blocks designed to be efficient and highly optimized.