End-to-end Testing using React, Jest, and the TestProject JavaScript OpenSDK

With a long list of end-to-end (e2e) test frameworks available to choose from, it’s hard to know which one you should be using. Cypress and Selenium are leading the market as the most widely used options, but there’s also Appium for mobile app testing, Puppeteer for automating tasks in Chrome, and Protractor for Angular and AngularJS applications, just to name a few.

Recently a newcomer has joined the pack: TestProject, a free, open-source test automation platform for e2e testing that helps simplify the web, mobile, and API testing. The TestProject SDK has language support for Java, C#, Python, and, most recently, JavaScript.

This article will show how we can use the TestProject JavaScript OpenSDK to test a React app with Jest as our test framework.

Ready to get started?

#javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

End-to-end Testing using React, Jest, and the TestProject JavaScript OpenSDK
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

End-to-End Testing With React, Jest, and the TestProject JavaScript OpenSDK

A look at the newest testing framework

With a long list of end-to-end (e2e) test frameworks available to choose from, it’s hard to know which one you should be using.  Cypress and  Selenium are leading the market as the most widely used options, but there’s also  Appium for mobile app testing,  Puppeteer for automating tasks in Chrome, and Protractor for Angular and AngularJS applications, just to name a few.

Recently, a newcomer has joined the pack:  TestProject, a free, open source test automation platform for e2e testing that helps simplify web, mobile, and API testing. The TestProject SDK has language support for Java, C#, Python, and, most recently, JavaScript.

In this article, we’ll show how we can use the  TestProject JavaScript OpenSDK to test a React app with  Jest as our test framework.

Ready to get started?

App Overview

To begin, let’s take a look at the demo app that we’ll be testing. This app is relatively straightforward: just a simple request form in which a user can enter their first name, last name, and email address.

Demo app: request form

Demo app: request form

If the form is submitted without being properly filled out, error messages are shown below each invalid input.

#react #javascript #programming #testing

E2E Testing with React, Jest, and the TestProject JavaScript OpenSDK

Who knows what the future will hold for the world of end-to-end test automation, but TestProject is certainly a platform worth keeping your eye on.

With a long list of end-to-end (e2e) test frameworks available to choose from, it’s hard to know which one you should be using.  Cypress and  Selenium are leading the market as the most widely used options, but there’s also  Appium for mobile app testing,  Puppeteer for automating tasks in Chrome, and  Protractor for Angular and AngularJS applications, just to name a few.

Recently a newcomer has joined the pack:  TestProject, a free, open-source test automation platform for e2e testing that helps simplify web, mobile, and API testing. The TestProject SDK has language support for Java, C#, Python, and, most recently, JavaScript.

In this article we’ll show how we can use the  TestProject JavaScript OpenSDK to test a React app with  Jest as our test framework.

Ready to get started?

App Overview

To begin, let’s take a look at the demo app that we’ll be testing. This app is relatively straightforward: just a simple request form in which a user can enter their first name, last name, and email address.

Demo app: request form

Demo app: request form

If the form is submitted without being properly filled out, error messages are shown below each invalid input.

#javascript #tutorial #react #jest #e2e testing #e2e

Cayla  Erdman

Cayla Erdman

1601476020

Unit Testing With Jest in Javascript,  — React

In part one of “Unit Testing with Jest in Javascript” we discussed the basics of unit testing and some of the basic ways to implement tests to a vanilla Javascript project, but what if you are using a React framework? When you want to test some of your React components using Jest unit testing, there are a few extra steps that should be taken to ensure proper testing is completed. I would suggest reading part one to the series here before continuing on so that you get the basic knowledge and learn how to set things up before moving forward with this article.

Set Up

In part one we discussed how to set your environment up for testing. The same rules apply, but you will also need to install Enzyme. Enzyme gives you the ability to simulate rendering your application, without actually having to render it. To install both Jest, Enzyme, and the Enzyme adapter for React version 16 at the same time, you can run the following code in your terminal: _npm i --save-dev enzyme enzyme-adapter-react-16._ When you run this line in the terminal you should have a file called setupTests.js that was created. You will then need to place some code in this file that will configure Enzyme to your React adapter based on which version you are using. This code, shown in the photo below, can be found in the Enzyme docs previously linked. This is a file that Enzyme will search for when running tests.

Image for post

Be sure you are importing “Adapter” for the right react version. Check docs!

Mocking Components

When unit testing in React, we want to be able to create mock data that can be used to test out components. We do not want to have to pull this data from the back end, because at that point, it would not be considered a unit test. So we get around this, by creating mock data using enzyme. Enzyme has three different rendering methods: shallow, full DOM, static render markup. Static render markup is actually imported from a third party, and full DOM requires a full DOM API to run it’s tests because it must have a browser-like environment. You can look into these two on your own, but today we will be discussing some of the capabilities provided through shallow rendering. Shallow rendering allows you to test your components as a whole and helps to ensure you are following proper separation of concerns.

#enzyme #jest #test-driven-development #javascript #react #react native

Madyson  Reilly

Madyson Reilly

1600115940

How to Test With Jest

Hi there, welcome back! Thank you for stopping by. Last month in my Getting Started with AWS article I wrote:

“_ If you are a budding developer looking to get that first opportunity, it is important to get familiar with some of the different cloud infrastructure providers out there. _”

The exact same can be said for writing tests for your code and the Testing Frameworks and libraries that help you do it. In this article, we will walk through setting up some unit tests with [jest](https://jestjs.io/) and [react-testing-librar](https://testing-library.com/docs/react-testing-library/intro)``y for some components in an existing React application.

What is Jest?

Jest is a delightful JavaScript Testing Framework with a focus on simplicity.

It works with projects using: BabelTypeScriptNodeReactAngularVue, and more!

What is React Testing Library?

The _React Testing Library_ is a very light-weight solution for testing React components. It provides light utility functions on top of _react-dom_ and _react-dom/test-utils_, in a way that encourages better testing practices. Its primary guiding principle is:

The more your tests resemble the way your software is used, the more confidence they can give you.

So rather than dealing with instances of rendered React components, your tests will work with actual DOM nodes. The utilities this library provides facilitate querying the DOM in the same way the user would.

Let’s get started!


The Application

For this example, we have a simple SPA bootstrapped using the create-react-app your-apps-name command. The app has 2 simple components, a counter with “up” and “down” buttons. Clicking them increases and decreases the count displayed on the screen. The other component is a basic form with a submit button. Filling the form and clicking submit will display the message typed in the form.

When you create projects using the[Create React App](https://create-react-app.dev/) command, you have out of the box support for React Testing Library and Jest. If you didn’t use that command, you can add them via npm like so:

// Install React Testing Library
npm install --save-dev @testing-library/react

// Install Jest
npm install --save -dev jest

The Components:

As mentioned, our first component is the Counter component.

Image for post

As you can see, it is a very simple component that manages state locally with the [useState](https://reactjs.org/docs/hooks-state.html) hook(line 5 and 6). It has a single arrow function called handleClick (line 8) that manages both button clicks with some conditional statements. It also removes the element from the screen based on a nested conditional statements(line 17).

Our second component is the Printer component.

Image for post

This component has a bit more going on. Again, we manage all our state attributes with the useState hook(lines 4 – 7). In this case, we have a handleChange arrow function (line 9) that manages input changes on the form when the user is typing in the input field. Finally, we have a handleClick arrow function (line 13) that triggers all our state changes. Also, this component disables the “Print” button if there is no data in the input field.

#unit-testing #react-testing-library #jest #react #javascript