Hollie  Ratke

Hollie Ratke

1600527600

The Novice's Guide To Side-Hustles

I don’t know about you but in my view, work culture seems to have taken a 360- degree turn since the time I got into the workforce in 2012. For years before that, I saw people stay in the same job for years.

They often left their comfort zones and hometowns to immigrate to new cities and countries in search of that one perfect opportunity — in which they then stayed all the way till retirement. Say for my father and many other relatives who stayed in the same job for more than 20 years.

Nothing wrong with that however the times have changed since then. In recent times people have started changing jobs more frequently owing to COVID more and more people, as well as, companies are looking for gig workers and contractors.

#startup-lessons #side-hustle #startup-advice #web-monetization #startup #startups #startups-top-story #entrepreneurship

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

The Novice's Guide To Side-Hustles

Austin Gerald

1640618368

Starting a business is quite an important task for the vast majority of people because it helps to get development in the future. By the way, I would also like to change the fact that recently my friend advised me to use this site https://shiftedmag.com/mistakes-of-small-it-startup/ where it is possible to find out about the most common mistakes and open an information startup. This gave me the opportunity to better understand the basics of doing business, I hope that you will do the same.

Zachary Palmer

Zachary Palmer

1555901576

CSS Flexbox Tutorial | Build a Chat Application

Creating the conversation sidebar and main chat section

In this article we are going to focus on building a basic sidebar, and the main chat window inside our chat shell. See below.

Chat shell with a fixed width sidebar and expanded chat window

This is the second article in this series. You can check out the previous article for setting up the shell OR you can just check out the chat-shell branch from the following repository.

https://github.com/lyraddigital/flexbox-chat-app.git

Open up the chat.html file. You should have the following HTML.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8" />
    <title>Chat App</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="screen" href="css/chat.css" />
</head>
<body>
    <div id="chat-container">
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Now inside of the chat-container div add the following HTML.

<div id="side-bar">
</div>
<div id="chat-window">
</div>

Now let’s also add the following CSS under the #chat-container selector in the chat.css file.

#side-bar {
    background: #0048AA;
    border-radius: 10px 0 0 10px;
}
#chat-window {
    background: #999;
    border-radius: 0 10px 10px 0;
}

Now reload the page. You should see the following:-

So what happened? Where is our sidebar and where is our chat window? I expected to see a blue side bar and a grey chat window, but it’s no where to be found. Well it’s all good. This is because we have no content inside of either element, so it can be 0 pixels wide.

Sizing Flex Items

So now that we know that our items are 0 pixels wide, let’s attempt to size them. We’ll attempt to try this first using explicit widths.

Add the following width property to the #side-bar rule, then reload the page.

width: 275px;

Hmm. Same result. It’s still a blank shell. Oh wait I have to make sure the height is 100% too. So we better do that too. Once again add the following property to the #side-bar rule, then reload the page.

height: 100%;

So now we have our sidebar that has grown to be exactly 275 pixels wide, and is 100% high. So that’s it. We’re done right? Wrong. Let me ask you a question. How big is the chat window? Let’s test that by adding some text to it. Try this yourself just add some text. You should see something similar to this.

So as you can see the chat window is only as big as the text that’s inside of it, and it is not next to the side bar. And this makes sense because up until now the chat shell is not a flex container, and just a regular block level element.

So let’s make our chat shell a flex container. Set the following display property for the #chat-window selector. Then reload the page.

display: flex;

So as you can see by the above illustration, we can see it’s now next to the side bar, and not below it. But as you can see currently it’s only as wide as the text that’s inside of it.

But we want it to take up the remaining space of the chat shell. Well we know how to do this, as we did it in the previous article. Set the flex-grow property to 1 on the #chat-window selector. Basically copy and paste the property below and reload the page.

flex-grow: 1;

So now we have the chat window taking up the remaining space of the chat shell. Next, let’s remove the background property, and also remove all text inside the chat-window div if any still exists. You should now see the result below.

But are we done? Technically yes, but before we move on, let’s improve things a little bit.

Understanding the default alignment

If you remember, before we had defined our chat shell to be a flex container, we had to make sure we set the height of the side bar to be 100%. Otherwise it was 0 pixels high, and as a result nothing was displayed. With that said, try removing the height property from the #side-bar selector and see what happens when you reload the page. Yes that’s right, it still works. The height of the sidebar is still 100% high.

So what happened here? Why do we no longer have to worry about setting the height to 100%? Well this is one of the cool things Flexbox gives you for free. By default every flex item will stretch vertically to fill in the entire height of the flex container. We can in fact change this behaviour, and we will see how this is done in a future article.

Setting the size of the side bar properly

So another feature of Flexbox is being able to set the size of a flex item by using the flex-basis property. The flex-basis property allows you to specify an initial size of a flex item, before any growing or shrinking takes place. We’ll understand more about this in an upcoming article.

For now I just want you to understand one important thing. And that is using width to specify the size of the sidebar is not a good idea. Let’s see why.

Say that potentially, if the screen is mobile we want the side bar to now appear across the top of the chat shell, acting like a top bar instead. We can do this by changing the direction flex items can flex inside a flex container. For example, add the following CSS to the #chat-container selector. Then reload the page.

flex-direction: column;

So as you can see we are back to a blank shell. So firstly let’s understand what we actually did here. By setting the flex-direction property to column, we changed the direction of how the flex items flex. By default flex items will flex from left to right. However when we set flex-direction to column, it changes this behaviour forcing flex items to flex from top to bottom instead. On top of this, when the direction of flex changes, the sizing and alignment of flex items changes as well.

When flexing from left to right, we get a height of 100% for free as already mentioned, and then we made sure the side bar was set to be 275 pixels wide, by setting the width property.

However now that we a flexing from top to bottom, the width of the flex item by default would be 100% wide, and you would need to specify the height instead. So try this. Add the following property to the #side-bar selector to set the height of the side bar. Then reload the page.

height: 275px;

Now we are seeing the side bar again, as we gave it a fixed height too. But we still have that fixed width. That’s not what we wanted. We want the side bar (ie our new top bar) here to now be 100% wide. Comment out the width for a moment and reload the page again.

So now we were able to move our side bar so it appears on top instead, acting like a top bar. Which as previously mentioned might be suited for mobile device widths. But to do this we had to swap the value of width to be the value of height. Wouldn’t it be great if this size was preserved regardless of which direction our items are flexing.

Try this, remove all widths and height properties from the #side-bar selector and write the following instead. Then reload the page.

flex-basis: 275px;

As you can see we get the same result. Now remove the flex-direction property from the #chat-container selector. Then once again reload the page.

Once again we are back to our final output. But now we also have the flexibility to easily change the side bar to be a top bar if we need to, by just changing the direction items can flow. Regardless of the direction of flex, the size of our side bar / top bar is preserved.

Conclusion

Ok so once again we didn’t build much, but we did cover a lot of concepts about Flexbox around sizing. 

#css #programming #webdev 

Hollie  Ratke

Hollie Ratke

1600527600

The Novice's Guide To Side-Hustles

I don’t know about you but in my view, work culture seems to have taken a 360- degree turn since the time I got into the workforce in 2012. For years before that, I saw people stay in the same job for years.

They often left their comfort zones and hometowns to immigrate to new cities and countries in search of that one perfect opportunity — in which they then stayed all the way till retirement. Say for my father and many other relatives who stayed in the same job for more than 20 years.

Nothing wrong with that however the times have changed since then. In recent times people have started changing jobs more frequently owing to COVID more and more people, as well as, companies are looking for gig workers and contractors.

#startup-lessons #side-hustle #startup-advice #web-monetization #startup #startups #startups-top-story #entrepreneurship

Mike doctor

Mike doctor

1624305600

The 8 Top Side Hustles for College Students (2021)

In this video, I’m going over 8 TOP side hustles for college students! If you want to learn how to make money in college, this is the right video for you. I’ll be sharing some highly profitable side hustles that work well for college students, ranging from graduation shoots, to becoming a brand ambassador, all the way to dog walking and many more. These are the best ways to make an income as a college student.
Timeline:

0:00 - Introduction
0:19 - Campus/City Tours
2:04 - Brand Ambassador
3:05 - Become a Tutor
4:35 - Youtube Channel
5:34 - Create a Blog
6:51 - Dog Walking
8:39 - Virtual Assistant
10:14 - Graduation Shoots
11:54 - Wrap Up
📺 The video in this post was made by Charlie Chang
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EdOaT7SdZ7c
🔺 DISCLAIMER: The article is for information sharing. The content of this video is solely the opinions of the speaker who is not a licensed financial advisor or registered investment advisor. Not investment advice or legal advice.
Cryptocurrency trading is VERY risky. Make sure you understand these risks and that you are responsible for what you do with your money
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Thanks for visiting and watching! Please don’t forget to leave a like, comment and share!

#bitcoin #blockchain #the 8 top side hustles for college students (2021) #the 8 top side hustles #2021

Spring: A Static Web Site Generator Written By GitHub Issues

Spring

Spring is a blog engine written by GitHub Issues, or is a simple, static web site generator. No more server and database, you can setup it in free hosting with GitHub Pages as a repository, then post the blogs in the repository Issues.

You can add some labels in your repository Issues as the blog category, and create Issues for writing blog content through Markdown.

Spring has responsive templates, looking good on mobile, tablet, and desktop.Gracefully degrading in older browsers. Compatible with Internet Explorer 10+ and all modern browsers.

Get up and running in seconds.

中文介绍

Quick start guide

For the impatient, here's how to get a Spring blog site up and running.

First of all

  • Fork the Spring repository as yours.
  • Goto your repository settings page to rename Repository Name.
  • Hosted directly on GitHub Pages from your project repository, you can take it as User or organization site or Project site(create a gh-pages branch).
  • Also, you can set up a custom domain with Pages.

Secondly

  • Open the index.html file to edit the config variables with yours below.
$.extend(spring.config, {
  // my blog title
  title: 'Spring',
  // my blog description
  desc: "A blog engine written by github issues [Fork me on GitHub](https://github.com/zhaoda/spring)",
  // my github username
  owner: 'zhaoda',
  // creator's username
  creator: 'zhaoda',
  // the repository name on github for writting issues
  repo: 'spring',
  // custom page
  pages: [
  ]
})
  • Put your domain into the CNAME file if you have.
  • Commit your change and push it.

And then

  • Goto your repository settings page to turn on the Issues feature.
  • Browser this repository's issues page, like this https://github.com/your-username/your-repo-name/issues?state=open.
  • Click the New Issue button to just write some content as a new one blog.

Finally

  • Browser this repository's GitHub Pages url, like this http://your-username.github.io/your-repo-name, you will see your Spring blog, have a test.
  • And you're done!

Custom development

Installation

  • You will need a web server installed on your system, for example, Nginx, Apache etc.
  • Configure your spring project to your local web server directory.
  • Run and browser it, like http://localhost/spring/dev.html .
  • dev.html is used to develop, index.html is used to runtime.

Folder Structure

spring/
├── css/
|    ├── boot.less  #import other less files
|    ├── github.less  #github highlight style
|    ├── home.less  #home page style
|    ├── issuelist.less #issue list widget style
|    ├── issues.less #issues page style
|    ├── labels.less #labels page style
|    ├── main.less #commo style
|    ├── markdown.less #markdown format style
|    ├── menu.less #menu panel style
|    ├── normalize.less #normalize style
|    ├── pull2refresh.less #pull2refresh widget style
|    └── side.html  #side panel style
├── dist/
|    ├── main.min.css  #css for runtime
|    └── main.min.js  #js for runtime
├── img/  #some icon, startup images
├── js/
|    ├── lib/  #some js librarys need to use
|    ├── boot.js  #boot
|    ├── home.js  #home page
|    ├── issuelist.js #issue list widget
|    ├── issues.js #issues page
|    ├── labels.js #labels page
|    ├── menu.js #menu panel
|    ├── pull2refresh.less #pull2refresh widget
|    └── side.html  #side panel
├── css/
|    ├── boot.less  #import other less files
|    ├── github.less  #github highlight style
|    ├── home.less  #home page style
|    ├── issuelist.less #issue list widget style
|    ├── issues.less #issues page style
|    ├── labels.less #labels page style
|    ├── main.less #commo style
|    ├── markdown.less #markdown format style
|    ├── menu.less #menu panel style
|    ├── normalize.less #normalize style
|    ├── pull2refresh.less #pull2refresh widget style
|    └── side.html  #side panel style
├── dev.html #used to develop
├── favicon.ico #website icon
├── Gruntfile.js #Grunt task config
├── index.html #used to runtime
└── package.json  #nodejs install config

Customization

  • Browser http://localhost/spring/dev.html, enter the development mode.
  • Changes you want to modify the source code, like css, js etc.
  • Refresh dev.html view change.

Building

  • You will need Node.js installed on your system.
  • Installation package.
bash

$ npm install

*   Run grunt task.

    ```bash
$ grunt
  • Browser http://localhost/spring/index.html, enter the runtime mode.
  • If there is no problem, commit and push the code.
  • Don't forget to merge master branch into gh-pages branch if you have.
  • And you're done! Good luck!

Report a bug

Who used

If you are using, please tell me.

Download Details:
Author: zhaoda
Source Code: https://github.com/zhaoda/spring
License: MIT License

#spring #spring-framework #spring-boot #java 

Agnes  Sauer

Agnes Sauer

1594425840

A Data Scientist’s Guide to the Side Hustle 💰

Ah, the side hustle. There’s something so enticing about having an extra revenue stream, a profitable passion project, or a back-burner bonus gig. A lot of us have at least some way of accruing extra cash on the side, even if it’s simply investing spare change. There are entire industries catering to the side-hustle: Uber / Lyft will pay you to chariot patrons during off-hours; AirBnB offers an entire network of users interested in renting your home; Instagram rewards influencers that tout goods and services to followers. What started for me as a means of saving money for college (flipping exercise equipment on Craigslist 🤸‍♂) has evolved into evangelizing data science via teaching, writing, building software, and more to generate extra income.

So, how can you monetize your data science skills to make a bit of extra cash? We’ll explore some of my favorite ways to earn some 🍞 and build data skills.

Maybe you want to generate extra income to pay for those pesky subscription services. Or maybe you plan on jetting off to Bali and embracing a more bucolic relationship with remote work. Whatever the reason, I suggest setting a tangible goal and outline the steps or micro-goals you’ll need to get there.

My goal was simple. I wanted to spend a few extra hours every week to improve my knowledge of data science, and get paid to do it. I set my goal at $50 per week, and went about recording my milestones in both revenue and data science skills.


I’ll be ranking my favorite methods for earning money in terms of…

  1. Effort: generally, how much time will I need to commit per week?
  2. Value: normalizing for effort, how much is a viable payout?
  3. Difficulty: how much domain and/or technical expertise do I need?
  4. Consistency: how frequently can I expect to be paid?

Write for Medium

“Through a combination of algorithmic and editorial curation, posts on Medium get spread around based on interest and engagement. Some get hundreds of thousands of readers — and not because they were written by famous people. Medium is not about who you are or whom you know, but about what you have to say.”

— Medium

As a reader, you’re well acquainted with Medium and the amalgam of galvanizing perspectives that exist on the platform. It seems daunting to refine your brand and push content out into the world, but it can be empowering and lucrative. After months of casual observation (and many encouraging 👏), I finally turned on the tap and started publishing content. Wielding an old MacBook and a rudimentary understanding of prose, I set out to get published in my favorite Medium publication and earn enough to cover the $50 yearly subscription fee.

If you’re unfamiliar with how publishers earn money, check out this guide outlining the Medium Partner Program. Basically, you can publish content that’s eligible for revenue commensurate with views, claps, reading time and conversions (non-members sign-up for Medium). As a ‘fresh’ perspective in the Medium ecosystem, I look to established authors like Susan Li and Cassie Kozyrkov for inspiration.

Effor

#money-management #side-hustle #data-science #writing #passive-income #data analysis