RabbitMQ Tutorial - Publisher and Consumer program with example in nodeJS

RabbitMQ Tutorial - Publisher and Consumer program with example in nodeJS

In this part of the tutorial we'll write two small programs in nodejs; a producer that sends a single message, and a consumer that receives messages and prints them out. Concentrating on this very simple thing just to get started

In this part of the tutorial we'll write two small programs in nodejs; a producer that sends a single message, and a consumer that receives messages and prints them out. Concentrating on this very simple thing just to get started. It's a "This is technical babaji" of messaging.

We'll call our message publisher (sender) publisher.js and our message consumer (receiver) subscriber.js. The publisher will connect to RabbitMQ, send a single message, then exit.

RabbitMQ is a message broker: it accepts and forwards messages. You can think about it as a post office: when you put the mail that you want posting in a post box, you can be sure that Mr. or Ms. Mailperson will eventually deliver the mail to your recipient. In this analogy, RabbitMQ is a post box, a post office and a postman.

The major difference between RabbitMQ and the post office is that it doesn't deal with paper, instead it accepts, stores and forwards binary blobs of data ‒ messages.

Producing means nothing more than sending. A program that sends messages is a producer

A queue is the name for a post box which lives inside RabbitMQ. Although messages flow through RabbitMQ and your applications, they can only be stored inside a queue. A queue is only bound by the host's memory & disk limits, it's essentially a large message buffer. Many producers can send messages that go to one queue, and many consumers can try to receive data from one queue. This is how we represent a queue

Consuming has a similar meaning to receiving. A consumer is a program that mostly waits to receive messages

Note: that the producer, consumer, and broker do not have to reside on the same host; indeed in most applications they don't. An application can be both a producer and consumer, too.

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