RabbitMQ Tutorial - Publisher and Consumer program with example in nodeJS

In this part of the tutorial we’ll write two small programs in nodejs; a producer that sends a single message, and a consumer that receives messages and prints them out. Concentrating on this very simple thing just to get started. It’s a “This is technical babaji” of messaging.

We’ll call our message publisher (sender) publisher.js and our message consumer (receiver) subscriber.js. The publisher will connect to RabbitMQ, send a single message, then exit.

RabbitMQ is a message broker: it accepts and forwards messages. You can think about it as a post office: when you put the mail that you want posting in a post box, you can be sure that Mr. or Ms. Mailperson will eventually deliver the mail to your recipient. In this analogy, RabbitMQ is a post box, a post office and a postman.

The major difference between RabbitMQ and the post office is that it doesn’t deal with paper, instead it accepts, stores and forwards binary blobs of data ‒ messages.

Producing means nothing more than sending. A program that sends messages is a producer

A queue is the name for a post box which lives inside RabbitMQ. Although messages flow through RabbitMQ and your applications, they can only be stored inside a queue. A queue is only bound by the host’s memory & disk limits, it’s essentially a large message buffer. Many producers can send messages that go to one queue, and many consumers can try to receive data from one queue. This is how we represent a queue

Consuming has a similar meaning to receiving. A consumer is a program that mostly waits to receive messages

Note: that the producer, consumer, and broker do not have to reside on the same host; indeed in most applications they don’t. An application can be both a producer and consumer, too.

#node #nodejs #javascript

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RabbitMQ Tutorial - Publisher and Consumer program with example in nodeJS

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RabbitMQ Tutorial - Publisher and Consumer program with example in nodeJS

In this part of the tutorial we’ll write two small programs in nodejs; a producer that sends a single message, and a consumer that receives messages and prints them out. Concentrating on this very simple thing just to get started. It’s a “This is technical babaji” of messaging.

We’ll call our message publisher (sender) publisher.js and our message consumer (receiver) subscriber.js. The publisher will connect to RabbitMQ, send a single message, then exit.

RabbitMQ is a message broker: it accepts and forwards messages. You can think about it as a post office: when you put the mail that you want posting in a post box, you can be sure that Mr. or Ms. Mailperson will eventually deliver the mail to your recipient. In this analogy, RabbitMQ is a post box, a post office and a postman.

The major difference between RabbitMQ and the post office is that it doesn’t deal with paper, instead it accepts, stores and forwards binary blobs of data ‒ messages.

Producing means nothing more than sending. A program that sends messages is a producer

A queue is the name for a post box which lives inside RabbitMQ. Although messages flow through RabbitMQ and your applications, they can only be stored inside a queue. A queue is only bound by the host’s memory & disk limits, it’s essentially a large message buffer. Many producers can send messages that go to one queue, and many consumers can try to receive data from one queue. This is how we represent a queue

Consuming has a similar meaning to receiving. A consumer is a program that mostly waits to receive messages

Note: that the producer, consumer, and broker do not have to reside on the same host; indeed in most applications they don’t. An application can be both a producer and consumer, too.

#node #nodejs #javascript

Willie  Beier

Willie Beier

1596728880

Tutorial: Getting Started with R and RStudio

In this tutorial we’ll learn how to begin programming with R using RStudio. We’ll install R, and RStudio RStudio, an extremely popular development environment for R. We’ll learn the key RStudio features in order to start programming in R on our own.

If you already know how to use RStudio and want to learn some tips, tricks, and shortcuts, check out this Dataquest blog post.

Table of Contents

#data science tutorials #beginner #r tutorial #r tutorials #rstats #tutorial #tutorials

Arvel  Miller

Arvel Miller

1603068240

Decoding Nodejs

The main goal of this blog is to explain the “Architecture of Nodejs” and to know how the Nodejs works behind the scenes,

Generally, most of the server-side languages, like PHP, ASP.NET, Ruby, and including Nodejs follows multi-threaded architecture. That means for each client-side request initiates a new thread or even a new process.

In Nodejs, all those requests from the clients are handled in a single-thread using shared resources concurrently as It follows the “Single-Threaded Event Loop Model”.

ARCHITECTURE OF NODEJS

What Is EVENT-LOOP?

Event-Loop programming is a flow control in an application-defined by events. The basic principle of Nodejs’s event-driven loop is implementing a central mechanism that hears for events and calls the callback function once an event is turning up.

Nodejs is an event-loop that implements a run-time environment model to achieve non-blocking asynchronous behavior runs on Google Chrome’s V8 engine.

#nodejs #nodejs-developer #nodejs-architecture #nodejs-tutorial #backend #javascript #beginners #event-loop

Jeromy  Lowe

Jeromy Lowe

1599097440

Data Visualization in R with ggplot2: A Beginner Tutorial

A famous general is thought to have said, “A good sketch is better than a long speech.” That advice may have come from the battlefield, but it’s applicable in lots of other areas — including data science. “Sketching” out our data by visualizing it using ggplot2 in R is more impactful than simply describing the trends we find.

This is why we visualize data. We visualize data because it’s easier to learn from something that we can see rather than read. And thankfully for data analysts and data scientists who use R, there’s a tidyverse package called ggplot2 that makes data visualization a snap!

In this blog post, we’ll learn how to take some data and produce a visualization using R. To work through it, it’s best if you already have an understanding of R programming syntax, but you don’t need to be an expert or have any prior experience working with ggplot2

#data science tutorials #beginner #ggplot2 #r #r tutorial #r tutorials #rstats #tutorial #tutorials