Python Tip: The Difference Between "==" and "is" (Equality vs Identity)

Python Tip: The Difference Between “==” and “is” (Equality vs Identity)

In this Python Programming Tutorial, we will be learning the difference between using “==” and the “is” keyword when doing comparisons. The difference between these is that “==” checks to see if values are equal, and the “is” keyword checks their identity, which means it’s going to check if the values are identical in terms of being the same object in memory. We’ll learn more in the video. Let’s get started…

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Python Tip: The Difference Between "==" and "is" (Equality vs Identity)

What is the difference between = (single equal to) and == (double equal to)?

What is the difference between = (single equal to) and == (double equal to)?

  • The = (single equal to) is use to assign the value on the right to a variable
    on the left.

  • The == (double equal to) is use to compare to two values.

Explained By DDSRY

#difference between #singe equal to #double equal to #python #programming #developer

Python Tip: The Difference Between "==" and "is" (Equality vs Identity)

Python Tip: The Difference Between “==” and “is” (Equality vs Identity)

In this Python Programming Tutorial, we will be learning the difference between using “==” and the “is” keyword when doing comparisons. The difference between these is that “==” checks to see if values are equal, and the “is” keyword checks their identity, which means it’s going to check if the values are identical in terms of being the same object in memory. We’ll learn more in the video. Let’s get started…

#python

Python Quick Tip: The Difference Between "==" and "is" (Equality vs Identity)

In this Python Programming Tutorial, we will be learning the difference between using “==” and the “is” keyword when doing comparisons. The difference between these is that “==” checks to see if values are equal, and the “is” keyword checks their identity, which means it’s going to check if the values are identical in terms of being the same object in memory. We’ll learn more in the video. Let’s get started…

#python

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623303480

What is the Difference Between “is” and “==” in Python

How to compare whether two variables point to the same object in memory

Python comes with two operators that can be used to check equality, namely ==(which is fairly common in most modern programming languages ) and is. It may sometimes be tricky to distinguish which of the two you should use, especially if you are not familiar with Python’s dynamic typing model.

In today’s article we are going to discuss the purpose of both == and is operators in Python when it comes to comparing two variables or objects. Additionally, we’ll go through an example to showcase when to use one over the other.

#data-science #coding #programming #python #software-development #difference between “is” and “==” in python

Ikram Mihan

Ikram Mihan

1585663749

What the difference between “==” vs. “is” in Python

In this article, I’m going to talk about the difference between == and is. I see many people who are confused about that, and I will try to make it simple. Get ready.

Everything I talk about here is valid for CPython (the most popular one).

Everything Is an Object in Python

First of all, everything is an object in Python. In Python, when you say x = 5, you basically create an integer object. I will dive into what is happening in the background in another article (byte code, Pyobject, and some other stuff).

==

I will mostly focus on is because the == operator is super simple to explain. When you say 5 == 5, it compares these two objects and says if they are equal or not.

is

This is different. When you say x = 5 and run the source code, 5 (int object) is created in memory and its memory address doesn’t change.

You can find its memory address by using the id(x) function. So, the output of id(x) is the address of the object in memory. Let’s walk through an example.

a = ['python']
b = ['python']
print(id(a))  # output is 139731532973312
print(id(b))  # output is 139731532041472

Above, two list objects are created and allocated in memory at different addresses (look at outputs) so when you say a is b, you basically say id(a) == id(b), so it will return False because they are allocated to different places in memory. Let’s walk through another example

a = ['python']
b = a
print(id(a))  # output is 140629850170880
print(id(b))  # output is 140629850170880

What happened here? Why do they have the same ID? Let me explain.

In the first line, you create a list object and a is pointing to this object. In the second line, you said b = a. This basically means, b points to what a points to.

So, in the second line, b is pointing to the same object a is pointing to. The object memory address is still the same, thus, the ID for both is the same.

Conclusion

== and is compare different things. Be careful when you use them.

Check my GitHub respiratory, star it and follow me if you like. you can find useful python codes which I update as much as I can.

Thank you!

#python #data science #devops #backend