Introduction to IdentityServer for ASP.NET Core (2019)

Create Simple Login Page using Angular 8 and HTTP Authentication

Create Simple Login Page using Angular 8 and HTTP Authentication

In this article, you'll learn how to setup a simple login page using Angular 8 and Basic HTTP authentication

In this article, you'll learn how to setup a simple login page using Angular 8 and Basic HTTP authentication

Tutorial built with Angular 8.0.2 and the Angular CLI

Angular CLI was used to generate the base project structure with the ng new command, the CLI is also used to build and serve the application. For more info about the Angular CLI see https://angular.io/cli.

Styling of the example app is all done with Bootstrap 4.3, for more info about Bootstrap see https://getbootstrap.com/docs/4.3/getting-started/introduction/.

Running the Angular 8 Basic Authentication Tutorial Example Locally
  1. Install NodeJS and NPM from https://nodejs.org/en/download/.
  2. Download or clone the tutorial project source code from https://github.com/cornflourblue/angular-8-basic-authentication-example
  3. Install all required npm packages by running npm install from the command line in the project root folder (where the package.json is located).
  4. Start the application by running npm start from the
  5. command line in the project root folder, this will build the application
  6. and automatically launch it in the browser on the URL
  7. http://localhost:4200.

NOTE: You can also run the app directly using the Angular CLI command ng serve --open. To do this first install the Angular CLI globally on your system with the command npm install -g @angular/cli.

Running the Tutorial Example with a Real Backend API

The Angular 8 basic authentication example app uses a fake / mock backend by default so it can run in the browser without a real api, to switch to a real backend api you just have to remove or comment out the line below the comment // provider used to create fake backend located in the /src/app/app.module.ts file.

Angular 8 Tutorial Project Structure

The app and code structure of the tutorial mostly follows the best practice recommendations in the official Angular Style Guide, with a few of my own tweaks here and there.

Each feature has it's own folder (home & login), other shared/common code such as services, models, helpers etc are placed in folders prefixed with an underscore _ to easily differentiate them and group them together at the top of the folder structure.

The index.ts files in each folder are barrel files that group the exported modules from a folder together so they can be imported using the folder path instead of the full module path and to enable importing multiple modules in a single import (e.g. import { AuthenticationService, UserService } from '../_services').

Path aliases @app and @environments have been configured in tsconfig.json that map to the /src/app and /src/environments directories. This allows imports to be relative to the app and environments folders by prefixing import paths with aliases instead of having to use long relative paths (e.g. import MyComponent from '../../../MyComponent').

Here are the main project files that contain the application logic, I left out some files that were generated by Angular CLI ng new command that I didn't change.

  • src
  • app
  • _helpers
  • auth.guard.ts
  • basic-auth.interceptor.ts
  • error.interceptor.ts
  • fake-backend.ts
  • index.ts
  • _models
  • user.ts
  • index.ts
  • _services
  • authentication.service.ts
  • user.service.ts
  • index.ts
  • home
  • home.component.html
  • home.component.ts
  • index.ts
  • login
  • login.component.html
  • login.component.ts
  • index.ts
  • app.component.html
  • app.component.ts
  • app.module.ts
  • app.routing.ts
  • environments
  • environment.prod.ts
  • environment.ts
  • index.html
  • main.ts
  • polyfills.ts
  • styles.less
  • package.json
  • tsconfig.json
Auth Guard

Path: /src/app/_helpers/auth.guard.ts

The auth guard is an angular route guard that's used to prevent unauthenticated users from accessing restricted routes, it does this by implementing the CanActivate interface which allows the guard to decide if a route can be activated with the canActivate() method. If the method returns true the route is activated (allowed to proceed), otherwise if the method returns false the route is blocked.

The auth guard uses the authentication service to check if the user is logged in, if they are logged in it returns true from the canActivate() method, otherwise it returns false and redirects the user to the login page.

Angular route guards are attached to routes in the router config, this auth guard is used in app.routing.ts to protect the home page route.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { Router, CanActivate, ActivatedRouteSnapshot, RouterStateSnapshot } from '@angular/router';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class AuthGuard implements CanActivate {
    constructor(
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) { }

    canActivate(route: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, state: RouterStateSnapshot) {
        const currentUser = this.authenticationService.currentUserValue;
        if (currentUser) {
            // logged in so return true
            return true;
        }

        // not logged in so redirect to login page with the return url
        this.router.navigate(['/login'], { queryParams: { returnUrl: state.url } });
        return false;
    }
}
Basic Authentication Interceptor

Path: /src/app/_helpers/basic-auth.interceptor.ts

The Basic Authentication Interceptor intercepts http requests from the application to add basic authentication credentials to the Authorization header if the user is logged in.

It's implemented using the HttpInterceptor class included in the HttpClientModule, by extending the HttpInterceptor class you can create a custom interceptor to modify http requests before they get sent to the server.

Http interceptors are added to the request pipeline in the providers section of the _app.module.ts_ file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable } from 'rxjs';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable()
export class BasicAuthInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    constructor(private authenticationService: AuthenticationService) { }

    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        // add authorization header with basic auth credentials if available
        const currentUser = this.authenticationService.currentUserValue;
        if (currentUser && currentUser.authdata) {
            request = request.clone({
                setHeaders: { 
                    Authorization: `Basic ${currentUser.authdata}`
                }
            });
        }

        return next.handle(request);
    }
}
Http Error Interceptor

Path: /src/app/_helpers/error.interceptor.ts

The Error Interceptor intercepts http responses from the api to check if there were any errors. If there is a 401 Unauthorized response the user is automatically logged out of the application, all other errors are re-thrown up to the calling service so an alert with the error can be displayed on the screen.

It's implemented using the HttpInterceptor class included in the HttpClientModule, by extending the HttpInterceptor class you can create a custom interceptor to catch all error responses from the server in a single location.

Http interceptors are added to the request pipeline in the providers section of the app.module.ts file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable, throwError } from 'rxjs';
import { catchError } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable()
export class ErrorInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    constructor(private authenticationService: AuthenticationService) { }

    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        return next.handle(request).pipe(catchError(err => {
            if (err.status === 401) {
                // auto logout if 401 response returned from api
                this.authenticationService.logout();
                location.reload(true);
            }

            const error = err.error.message || err.statusText;
            return throwError(error);
        }))
    }
}
Fake Backend Provider

Path: /src/app/_helpers/fake-backend.ts

In order to run and test the Angular application without a real backend API, the example uses a fake backend that intercepts the HTTP requests from the Angular app and send back "fake" responses. This is done by a class that implements the Angular HttpInterceptor interface, for more information on Angular HTTP Interceptors see https://angular.io/api/common/http/HttpInterceptor

The fake backend contains a handleRoute function that checks if the request matches one of the faked routes in the switch statement, at the moment this includes POST requests to the /users/authenticate route for handling authentication, and GET requests to the /users route for getting all users.

Requests to the authenticate route are handled by the authenticate() function which checks the username and password against an array of hardcoded users. If the username and password are correct then an ok response is returned with the user details, otherwise an error response is returned.

Requests to the get users route are handled by the getUsers() function which checks if the user is logged in by calling the new isLoggedIn() helper function. If the user is logged in an ok() response with the whole users array is returned, otherwise a 401 Unauthorized response is returned by calling the new unauthorized() helper function.

If the request doesn't match any of the faked routes it is passed through as a real HTTP request to the backend API.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpResponse, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor, HTTP_INTERCEPTORS } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable, of, throwError } from 'rxjs';
import { delay, mergeMap, materialize, dematerialize } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { User } from '@app/_models';

const users: User[] = [{ id: 1, username: 'test', password: 'test', firstName: 'Test', lastName: 'User' }];

@Injectable()
export class FakeBackendInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        const { url, method, headers, body } = request;

        // wrap in delayed observable to simulate server api call
        return of(null)
            .pipe(mergeMap(handleRoute))
            .pipe(materialize()) // call materialize and dematerialize to ensure delay even if an error is thrown (https://github.com/Reactive-Extensions/RxJS/issues/648)
            .pipe(delay(500))
            .pipe(dematerialize());

        function handleRoute() {
            switch (true) {
                case url.endsWith('/users/authenticate') && method === 'POST':
                    return authenticate();
                case url.endsWith('/users') && method === 'GET':
                    return getUsers();
                default:
                    // pass through any requests not handled above
                    return next.handle(request);
            }    
        }

        // route functions

        function authenticate() {
            const { username, password } = body;
            const user = users.find(x => x.username === username && x.password === password);
            if (!user) return error('Username or password is incorrect');
            return ok({
                id: user.id,
                username: user.username,
                firstName: user.firstName,
                lastName: user.lastName
            })
        }

        function getUsers() {
            if (!isLoggedIn()) return unauthorized();
            return ok(users);
        }

        // helper functions

        function ok(body?) {
            return of(new HttpResponse({ status: 200, body }))
        }

        function error(message) {
            return throwError({ error: { message } });
        }

        function unauthorized() {
            return throwError({ status: 401, error: { message: 'Unauthorised' } });
        }

        function isLoggedIn() {
            return headers.get('Authorization') === `Basic ${window.btoa('test:test')}`;
        }
    }
}

export let fakeBackendProvider = {
    // use fake backend in place of Http service for backend-less development
    provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS,
    useClass: FakeBackendInterceptor,
    multi: true
};
User Model

Path: /src/app/_models/user.ts

The user model is a small class that defines the properties of a user.

export class User {
    id: number;
    username: string;
    password: string;
    firstName: string;
    lastName: string;
    authdata?: string;
}
Authentication Service

Path: /src/app/_services/authentication.service.ts

The authentication service is used to login & logout of the Angular app, it notifies other components when the user logs in & out, and allows access the currently logged in user.

RxJS Subjects and Observables are used to store the current user object and notify other components when the user logs in and out of the app. Angular components can subscribe() to the public currentUser: Observable property to be notified of changes, and notifications are sent when the this.currentUserSubject.next() method is called in the login() and logout() methods, passing the argument to each subscriber. The RxJS BehaviorSubject is a special type of Subject that keeps hold of the current value and emits it to any new subscribers as soon as they subscribe, while regular Subjects don't store the current value and only emit values that are published after a subscription is created.

The login() method sends the user credentials to the API via an HTTP POST request for authentication. If successful the user's basic authentication data (base64 encoded username and password) is added to the user object and stored in localStorage to keep the user logged in between page refreshes. The user object is then published to all subscribers with the call to this.currentUserSubject.next(user);.

The basic auth data is used by the basic authentication interceptor above to set the authorization header of http requests made to secure api endpoints.

The constructor() of the service initialises the currentUserSubject with the currentUser object from localStorage which enables the user to stay logged in between page refreshes or after the browser is closed. The public currentUser property is then set to this.currentUserSubject.asObservable(); which allows other components to subscribe to the currentUser Observable but doesn't allow them to publish to the currentUserSubject, this is so logging in and out of the app can only be done via the authentication service.

The currentUserValue getter allows other components an easy way to get the value of the currently logged in user without having to subscribe to the currentUser Observable.

The logout() method removes the current user object from local storage and publishes null to the currentUserSubject to notify all subscribers that the user has logged out.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpClient } from '@angular/common/http';
import { BehaviorSubject, Observable } from 'rxjs';
import { map } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { environment } from '@environments/environment';
import { User } from '@app/_models';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class AuthenticationService {
    private currentUserSubject: BehaviorSubject;
    public currentUser: Observable;

    constructor(private http: HttpClient) {
        this.currentUserSubject = new BehaviorSubject(JSON.parse(localStorage.getItem('currentUser')));
        this.currentUser = this.currentUserSubject.asObservable();
    }

    public get currentUserValue(): User {
        return this.currentUserSubject.value;
    }

    login(username: string, password: string) {
        return this.http.post(`${environment.apiUrl}/users/authenticate`, { username, password })
            .pipe(map(user => {
                // store user details and basic auth credentials in local storage to keep user logged in between page refreshes
                user.authdata = window.btoa(username + ':' + password);
                localStorage.setItem('currentUser', JSON.stringify(user));
                this.currentUserSubject.next(user);
                return user;
            }));
    }

    logout() {
        // remove user from local storage to log user out
        localStorage.removeItem('currentUser');
        this.currentUserSubject.next(null);
    }
}
User Service

Path: /src/app/_services/user.service.ts

The user service contains a method for getting all users from the api, I included it to demonstrate accessing a secure api endpoint with the http authorization header set after logging in to the application, the auth header is automatically set with basic authentication credentials by the basic authentication interceptor. The secure endpoint in the example is a fake one implemented in the fake backend provider.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpClient } from '@angular/common/http';

import { environment } from '@environments/environment';
import { User } from '@app/_models';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class UserService {
    constructor(private http: HttpClient) { }

    getAll() {
        return this.http.get(`${environment.apiUrl}/users`);
    }
}
Home Component Template

Path: /src/app/home/home.component.html

The home component template contains html and angular 8 template syntax for displaying a simple welcome message and a list of users from a secure api endpoint.


    #### You're logged in with Angular 8 & Basic HTTP Authentication!!

    
        ###### Users from secure api end point

        

        
            {{user.firstName}} {{user.lastName}}
        
    

Home Component

Path: /src/app/home/home.component.ts

The home component defines an angular 8 component that gets all users from the user service and makes them available to the template via a users array property.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { first } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { User } from '@app/_models';
import { UserService } from '@app/_services';

@Component({ templateUrl: 'home.component.html' })
export class HomeComponent {
    loading = false;
    users: User[];

    constructor(private userService: UserService) { }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.loading = true;
        this.userService.getAll().pipe(first()).subscribe(users => {
            this.loading = false;
            this.users = users;
        });
    }
}
Login Component Template

Path: /src/app/login/login.component.html

The login component template contains a login form with username and password fields. It displays validation messages for invalid fields when the submit button is clicked. The form submit event is bound to the onSubmit() method of the login component.


    
        Username: test

        Password: test
    
    
        #### Angular 8 Basic Auth Login Example

        
            
                
                    Username
                    
                    
                        Username is required

                    
                
                
                    Password
                    
                    
                        Password is required

                    
                
                
                    
                    Login
                
                {{error}}

            
        
    

Login Component

Path: /src/app/login/login.component.ts

The login component uses the authentication service to login to the application. If the user is already logged in they are automatically redirected to the home page.

The loginForm: FormGroup object defines the form controls and validators, and is used to access data entered into the form. The FormGroup is part of the Angular Reactive Forms module and is bound to the login template above with the [formGroup]="loginForm" directive.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { Router, ActivatedRoute } from '@angular/router';
import { FormBuilder, FormGroup, Validators } from '@angular/forms';
import { first } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Component({ templateUrl: 'login.component.html' })
export class LoginComponent implements OnInit {
    loginForm: FormGroup;
    loading = false;
    submitted = false;
    returnUrl: string;
    error = '';

    constructor(
        private formBuilder: FormBuilder,
        private route: ActivatedRoute,
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) { 
        // redirect to home if already logged in
        if (this.authenticationService.currentUserValue) { 
            this.router.navigate(['/']);
        }
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.loginForm = this.formBuilder.group({
            username: ['', Validators.required],
            password: ['', Validators.required]
        });

        // get return url from route parameters or default to '/'
        this.returnUrl = this.route.snapshot.queryParams['returnUrl'] || '/';
    }

    // convenience getter for easy access to form fields
    get f() { return this.loginForm.controls; }

    onSubmit() {
        this.submitted = true;

        // stop here if form is invalid
        if (this.loginForm.invalid) {
            return;
        }

        this.loading = true;
        this.authenticationService.login(this.f.username.value, this.f.password.value)
            .pipe(first())
            .subscribe(
                data => {
                    this.router.navigate([this.returnUrl]);
                },
                error => {
                    this.error = error;
                    this.loading = false;
                });
    }
}
App Component Template

Path: /src/app/app.component.html

The app component template is the root component template of the application, it contains the main nav bar which is only displayed for authenticated users, and a router-outlet directive for displaying the contents of each view based on the current route / path.



    
        Home
        Logout
    




    

App Component

Path: /src/app/app.component.ts

The app component is the root component of the application, it defines the root tag of the app as `` with the selector property of the @Component() decorator.

It subscribes to the currentUser observable in the authentication service so it can reactively show/hide the main navigation bar when the user logs in/out of the application. I didn't worry about unsubscribing from the observable here because it's the root component of the application, the only time the component will be destroyed is when the application is closed which would destroy any subscriptions as well.

The app component contains a logout() method which is called from the logout link in the main nav bar above to log the user out and redirect them to the login page.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { Router } from '@angular/router';

import { AuthenticationService } from './_services';
import { User } from './_models';

@Component({ selector: 'app', templateUrl: 'app.component.html' })
export class AppComponent {
    currentUser: User;

    constructor(
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) {
        this.authenticationService.currentUser.subscribe(x => this.currentUser = x);
    }

    logout() {
        this.authenticationService.logout();
        this.router.navigate(['/login']);
    }
}
App Module

Path: /src/app/app.module.ts

The app module defines the root module of the application along with metadata about the module. For more info about angular 8 modules check out this page on the official docs site.

This is where the fake backend provider is added to the application, to switch to a real backend simply remove the providers located below the comment // provider used to create fake backend.

import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { ReactiveFormsModule } from '@angular/forms';
import { HttpClientModule, HTTP_INTERCEPTORS } from '@angular/common/http';

// used to create fake backend
import { fakeBackendProvider } from './_helpers';

import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
import { appRoutingModule } from './app.routing';

import { BasicAuthInterceptor, ErrorInterceptor } from './_helpers';
import { HomeComponent } from './home';
import { LoginComponent } from './login';

@NgModule({
    imports: [
        BrowserModule,
        ReactiveFormsModule,
        HttpClientModule,
        appRoutingModule
    ],
    declarations: [
        AppComponent,
        HomeComponent,
        LoginComponent
    ],
    providers: [
        { provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS, useClass: BasicAuthInterceptor, multi: true },
        { provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS, useClass: ErrorInterceptor, multi: true },

        // provider used to create fake backend
        fakeBackendProvider
    ],
    bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }
App Routing Module

Path: /src/app/app.routing.ts

Routing for the Angular app is configured as an array of Routes, each component is mapped to a path so the Angular Router knows which component to display based on the URL in the browser address bar. The home route is secured by passing the AuthGuard to the canActivate property of the route.

The Routes array is passed to the RouterModule.forRoot() method which creates a routing module with all of the app routes configured, and also includes all of the Angular Router providers and directives such as the `` directive. For more information on Angular Routing and Navigation see https://angular.io/guide/router.

import { Routes, RouterModule } from '@angular/router';

import { HomeComponent } from './home';
import { LoginComponent } from './login';
import { AuthGuard } from './_helpers';

const routes: Routes = [
    { path: '', component: HomeComponent, canActivate: [AuthGuard] },
    { path: 'login', component: LoginComponent },

    // otherwise redirect to home
    { path: '**', redirectTo: '' }
];

export const appRoutingModule = RouterModule.forRoot(routes);
Production Environment Config

Path: /src/environments/environment.prod.ts

The production environment config contains variables required to run the application in production. This enables you to build the application with a different configuration for each different environment (e.g. production & development) without updating the app code.

When you build the application for production with the command ng build --prod, the output environment.ts is replaced with environment.prod.ts.

export const environment = {
    production: true,
    apiUrl: 'http://localhost:4000'
};
Development Environment Config

Path: /src/environments/environment.ts

The development environment config contains variables required to run the application in development.

Environment config is accessed by importing the environment object into any Angular service of component with the line import { environment } from '@environments/environment' and accessing properties on the environment object, see the user service for an example.

export const environment = {
    production: false,
    apiUrl: 'http://localhost:4000'
};
Main Index Html File

Path: /src/index.html

The main index.html file is the initial page loaded by the browser that kicks everything off. The Angular CLI (with Webpack under the hood) bundles all of the compiled javascript files together and injects them into the body of the index.html page so the scripts can be loaded and executed by the browser.




    
    Angular 8 - Basic HTTP Authentication Tutorial & Example
    

    
    


    Loading...


Main (Bootstrap) File

Path: /src/main.ts

The main file is the entry point used by angular to launch and bootstrap the application.

import { enableProdMode } from '@angular/core';
import { platformBrowserDynamic } from '@angular/platform-browser-dynamic';

import { AppModule } from './app/app.module';
import { environment } from './environments/environment';

if (environment.production) {
    enableProdMode();
}

platformBrowserDynamic().bootstrapModule(AppModule)
    .catch(err => console.error(err));
Polyfills

Path: /src/polyfills.ts

Some features used by Angular 8 are not yet supported natively by all major browsers, polyfills are used to add support for features where necessary so your Angular 8 application works across all major browsers.

This file is generated by the Angular CLI when creating a new project with the ng new command, I've excluded the comments in the file for brevity.

import 'zone.js/dist/zone';
Global LESS/CSS Styles

Path: /src/styles.less

The global styles file contains LESS/CSS styles that are applied globally throughout the application.

/* You can add global styles to this file, and also import other style files */
a { cursor: pointer }
npm package.json

Path: /package.json

The package.json file contains project configuration information including package dependencies which get installed when you run npm install. Full documentation is available on the npm docs website.

{
    "name": "angular-8-basic-authentication-example",
    "version": "1.0.0",
    "scripts": {
        "ng": "ng",
        "start": "ng serve --open",
        "build": "ng build",
        "test": "ng test",
        "lint": "ng lint",
        "e2e": "ng e2e"
    },
    "private": true,
    "dependencies": {
        "@angular/animations": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/common": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/compiler": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/core": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/forms": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/platform-browser": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/router": "~8.0.1",
        "rxjs": "~6.4.0",
        "tslib": "^1.9.0",
        "zone.js": "~0.9.1"
    },
    "devDependencies": {
        "@angular-devkit/build-angular": "~0.800.0",
        "@angular/cli": "~8.0.3",
        "@angular/compiler-cli": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/language-service": "~8.0.1",
        "@types/node": "~8.9.4",
        "@types/jasmine": "~3.3.8",
        "@types/jasminewd2": "~2.0.3",
        "codelyzer": "^5.0.0",
        "jasmine-core": "~3.4.0",
        "jasmine-spec-reporter": "~4.2.1",
        "karma": "~4.1.0",
        "karma-chrome-launcher": "~2.2.0",
        "karma-coverage-istanbul-reporter": "~2.0.1",
        "karma-jasmine": "~2.0.1",
        "karma-jasmine-html-reporter": "^1.4.0",
        "protractor": "~5.4.0",
        "ts-node": "~7.0.0",
        "tslint": "~5.15.0",
        "typescript": "~3.4.3"
    }
}
TypeScript tsconfig.json

Path: /tsconfig.json

The tsconfig.json file configures how the TypeScript compiler will convert TypeScript into JavaScript that is understood by the browser. More information is available on the TypeScript docs.

Most of the file is unchanged from when it was generated by the Angular CLI, only the paths property has been added to map @app and @environments to the /src/app and /src/environments directories. This allows imports to be relative to the app and environments folders by prefixing import paths with aliases instead of having to use long relative paths (e.g. import MyComponent from '../../../MyComponent').

{
    "compileOnSave": false,
    "compilerOptions": {
        "baseUrl": "./",
        "outDir": "./dist/out-tsc",
        "sourceMap": true,
        "declaration": false,
        "downlevelIteration": true,
        "emitDecoratorMetadata": true,
        "experimentalDecorators": true,
        "module": "esnext",
        "moduleResolution": "node",
        "importHelpers": true,
        "target": "es2015",
        "typeRoots": [
            "node_modules/@types"
        ],
        "lib": [
            "es2018",
            "dom"
        ],
        "paths": {
            "@app/*": ["src/app/*"],
            "@environments/*": ["src/environments/*"]
        }
    }
}

The tutorial code is available on GitHub

Securing RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB

Securing RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB

A comprehensive step by step tutorial on securing or authentication RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB

A comprehensive step by step tutorial on securing or authentication RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB. Previously, we have shown you how to securing Spring Boot, MVC and MongoDB web application. In this tutorial, the secure endpoint will restrict the access from an unauthorized request. Every request to secure endpoint should bring authorization token with it. Of course, there will be an endpoint for login which will get authorization token after successful login.

Table of Contents:

The following software, tools, and frameworks are required for this tutorial:

We assume that you already installed all required software, tools, and frameworks. So, we will not cover how to install that software, tools, and frameworks.

1. Generate a New Spring Boot Gradle Project

To create or generate a new Spring Boot Application or Project, simply go to Spring Initializer. Fill all required fields as below then click on Generate Project button.

The project will automatically be downloaded as a Zip file. Next, extract the zipped project to your java projects folder. On the project folder root, you will find build.gradle file for register dependencies, initially it looks like this.

buildscript {
    ext {
        springBootVersion = '2.1.2.RELEASE'
    }
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:${springBootVersion}")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'org.springframework.boot'
apply plugin: 'io.spring.dependency-management'

group = 'com.djamware'
version = '0.0.1-SNAPSHOT'
sourceCompatibility = '1.8'

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    implementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-data-mongodb'
    implementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-security'
    implementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web'
    testImplementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-test'
    testImplementation 'org.springframework.security:spring-security-test'
}

Now, you can work with the source code of this Spring Boot Project using your own IDE or Text Editor. We are using Spring Tool Suite (STS). In STS, import the extracted zipped file as Existing Gradle Project.

Next, we have to add the JWT library to the build.gradle as the dependency. Open and edit build.gradle then add this line to dependencies after other implementation.

implementation 'io.jsonwebtoken:jjwt:0.9.1'

Next, compile the Gradle Project by type this command from Terminal or CMD.

./gradlew compile

Or you can compile directly from STS by right-clicking the project name then choose Gradle -> Refresh Gradle Project. Next, open and edit src/main/resources/application.properties then add these lines.

spring.data.mongodb.database=springmongodb
spring.data.mongodb.host=localhost
spring.data.mongodb.port=27017

2. Create Product, User and Role Model or Entity Classes

We will be creating all required models or entities for products, user and role. In STS, right-click the project name -> New -> Class. Fill the package with com.djamware.SecurityRest.models, the name with Product, and leave other fields and checkbox as default then click Finish Button.

Next, open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/models/Product.java then add this annotation above the class name that will point to MongoDB collection.

@Document(collection = "products")

Inside Product class, add these variables.

@Id
String id;
String prodName;
String prodDesc;
Double prodPrice;
String prodImage;

Add constructors after the variable or fields.

public Product() {
}

public Product(String prodName, String prodDesc, Double prodPrice, String prodImage) {
    super();
    this.prodName = prodName;
    this.prodDesc = prodDesc;
    this.prodPrice = prodPrice;
    this.prodImage = prodImage;
}

Generate or create Getter and Setter for each field.

public String getId() {
    return id;
}

public void setId(String id) {
    this.id = id;
}

public String getProdName() {
    return prodName;
}

public void setProdName(String prodName) {
    this.prodName = prodName;
}

public String getProdDesc() {
    return prodDesc;
}

public void setProdDesc(String prodDesc) {
    this.prodDesc = prodDesc;
}

public Double getProdPrice() {
    return prodPrice;
}

public void setProdPrice(Double prodPrice) {
    this.prodPrice = prodPrice;
}

public String getProdImage() {
    return prodImage;
}

public void setProdImage(String prodImage) {
    this.prodImage = prodImage;
}

Using STS you can organize imports automatically from the menu Source -> Organize Imports then you can see the imports after the package name.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.models;

import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.Document;

You can do the same way as the above step for User and Role class. Here’s the User class looks like.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.models;

import java.util.Set;

import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.IndexDirection;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.Indexed;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.DBRef;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.Document;

@Document(collection = "users")
public class User {

    @Id
    private String id;
    @Indexed(unique = true, direction = IndexDirection.DESCENDING, dropDups = true)
    private String email;
    private String password;
    private String fullname;
    private boolean enabled;
    @DBRef
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private Set<Role> roles;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getId() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setId(String id) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.id = id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getEmail() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setEmail(String email) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.email = email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getPassword() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setPassword(String password) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.password = password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getFullname() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return fullname;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setFullname(String fullname) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.fullname = fullname;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public boolean isEnabled() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return enabled;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setEnabled(boolean enabled) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.enabled = enabled;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public Set<Role> getRoles() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return roles;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setRoles(Set<Role> roles) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.roles = roles;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

}

And the Role class will be like this.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.models;

import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.IndexDirection;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.Indexed;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.Document;

@Document(collection = "roles")
public class Role {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Id
&nbsp; &nbsp; private String id;
&nbsp; &nbsp; @Indexed(unique = true, direction = IndexDirection.DESCENDING, dropDups = true)

&nbsp; &nbsp; private String role;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getId() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setId(String id) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.id = id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getRole() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return role;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setRole(String role) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.role = role;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

}

3. Create Product, User and Role Repository Interfaces

Next steps to create Product, User, and Role Repository Interfaces. From the STS, right-click the project name -> New -> Interface then fill all required fields and checkboxes as below before click Finish button.

Next, open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/repositories/ProductRepository.java then add extends to MongoDB CRUD Repository.

public interface ProductRepository extends CrudRepository<Product, String> {

}

Inside the class name add this method.

@Override
void delete(Product deleted);

Organize all required imports.

import org.springframework.data.repository.CrudRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Product;

The same way can be applied to User and Role repositories. So, the User Repository Interface will look like this.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories;

import org.springframework.data.mongodb.repository.MongoRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.User;

public interface UserRepository extends MongoRepository<User, String> {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;User findByEmail(String email);
}

And the Role Repository Interface will look like this.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories;

import org.springframework.data.mongodb.repository.MongoRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Role;

public interface RoleRepository extends MongoRepository<Role, String> {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Role findByRole(String role);
}

4. Create a Custom User Details Service

To implements authentication using existing User and Role from MongoDB, we have to create a custom user details service. From the STS, right-click the project name -> New -> Class File then fill all required fields and checkboxes as below before clicking the finish button.

Next, open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/services/CustomUserDetailsService.java then give an annotation above the class name and implement the Spring Security User Details Service.

@Service
public class CustomUserDetailsService implements UserDetailsService {
}

Next, inject all required beans at the first line of the class bracket.

@Autowired
private UserRepository userRepository;

@Autowired
private RoleRepository roleRepository;

@Autowired
private PasswordEncoder bCryptPasswordEncoder;

Add a method to find a user by email field.

public User findUserByEmail(String email) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return userRepository.findByEmail(email);
}

Add a method to save a new user.

public void saveUser(User user) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; user.setPassword(bCryptPasswordEncoder.encode(user.getPassword()));
&nbsp; &nbsp; user.setEnabled(true);
&nbsp; &nbsp; Role userRole = roleRepository.findByRole("ADMIN");
&nbsp; &nbsp; user.setRoles(new HashSet<>(Arrays.asList(userRole)));
&nbsp; &nbsp; userRepository.save(user);
}

Override the Spring Security User Details to load User by email.

@Override
public UserDetails loadUserByUsername(String email) throws UsernameNotFoundException {

&nbsp; &nbsp; User user = userRepository.findByEmail(email);
&nbsp; &nbsp; if(user != null) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; List<GrantedAuthority> authorities = getUserAuthority(user.getRoles());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return buildUserForAuthentication(user, authorities);
&nbsp; &nbsp; } else {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; throw new UsernameNotFoundException("username not found");
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Add a method to get a set of Roles that related to a user.

private List<GrantedAuthority> getUserAuthority(Set<Role> userRoles) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; Set<GrantedAuthority> roles = new HashSet<>();
&nbsp; &nbsp; userRoles.forEach((role) -> {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; roles.add(new SimpleGrantedAuthority(role.getRole()));
&nbsp; &nbsp; });

&nbsp; &nbsp; List<GrantedAuthority> grantedAuthorities = new ArrayList<>(roles);
&nbsp; &nbsp; return grantedAuthorities;
}

Add a method for authentication purpose.

private UserDetails buildUserForAuthentication(User user, List<GrantedAuthority> authorities) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return new org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.User(user.getEmail(), user.getPassword(), authorities);
}

5. Configure Spring Boot Security Rest

Now, the main purpose of this tutorial is configuring Spring Security Rest. First, we have to create a bean for JWT token generation and validation. Right-click the project name -> New -> Class File. Fill the package name as com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs and the Class name as JwtTokenProvider then click the Finish button. Next, open and edit that newly created class file then give it an annotation above the class name.

@Component
public class JwtTokenProvider {
}

Add variables and injected bean inside the class bracket at the top lines.

@Value("${security.jwt.token.secret-key:secret}")
private String secretKey = "secret";

@Value("${security.jwt.token.expire-length:3600000}")
private long validityInMilliseconds = 3600000; // 1h

@Autowired
private CustomUserDetailsService userDetailsService;

Add a method for initialization.

@PostConstruct
protected void init() {
&nbsp; &nbsp; secretKey = Base64.getEncoder().encodeToString(secretKey.getBytes());
}

Add a method to create a JWT token.

public String createToken(String username, Set<Role> set) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; Claims claims = Jwts.claims().setSubject(username);
&nbsp; &nbsp; claims.put("roles", set);
&nbsp; &nbsp; Date now = new Date();
&nbsp; &nbsp; Date validity = new Date(now.getTime() + validityInMilliseconds);
&nbsp; &nbsp; return Jwts.builder()//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .setClaims(claims)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .setIssuedAt(now)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .setExpiration(validity)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .signWith(SignatureAlgorithm.HS256, secretKey)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .compact();
}

Add a method to load User by username.

public Authentication getAuthentication(String token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; UserDetails userDetails = this.userDetailsService.loadUserByUsername(getUsername(token));
&nbsp; &nbsp; return new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(userDetails, "", userDetails.getAuthorities());
}

Add a method to get the username by JWT token.

public String getUsername(String token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return Jwts.parser().setSigningKey(secretKey).parseClaimsJws(token).getBody().getSubject();
}

Add a method to resolve JWT token from request headers of Authorization that has a Bearer prefix.

public String resolveToken(HttpServletRequest req) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; String bearerToken = req.getHeader("Authorization");
&nbsp; &nbsp; if (bearerToken != null && bearerToken.startsWith("Bearer ")) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return bearerToken.substring(7, bearerToken.length());
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; return null;
}

Add a method to validate a JWT token.

public boolean validateToken(String token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; try {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Jws<Claims> claims = Jwts.parser().setSigningKey(secretKey).parseClaimsJws(token);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (claims.getBody().getExpiration().before(new Date())) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return false;
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return true;
&nbsp; &nbsp; } catch (JwtException | IllegalArgumentException e) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; throw new JwtException("Expired or invalid JWT token");
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Finally, organize imports like below.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs;

import java.util.Base64;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.Set;

import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Value;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken;
import org.springframework.security.core.Authentication;
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UserDetails;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Role;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.services.CustomUserDetailsService;

import io.jsonwebtoken.Claims;
import io.jsonwebtoken.Jws;
import io.jsonwebtoken.JwtException;
import io.jsonwebtoken.Jwts;
import io.jsonwebtoken.SignatureAlgorithm;

Next, create a JWT filter class with the name JwtTokenFilter in configs package that extends Spring GenericFilterBean. Replace all Java codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs;

import java.io.IOException;

import javax.servlet.FilterChain;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.ServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.ServletResponse;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;

import org.springframework.security.core.Authentication;
import org.springframework.security.core.context.SecurityContextHolder;
import org.springframework.web.filter.GenericFilterBean;

public class JwtTokenFilter extends GenericFilterBean {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

&nbsp; &nbsp; public JwtTokenFilter(JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; this.jwtTokenProvider = jwtTokenProvider;
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @Override
&nbsp; &nbsp; public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain filterChain)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; throws IOException, ServletException {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; String token = jwtTokenProvider.resolveToken((HttpServletRequest) req);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (token != null && jwtTokenProvider.validateToken(token)) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Authentication auth = token != null ? jwtTokenProvider.getAuthentication(token) : null;
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; SecurityContextHolder.getContext().setAuthentication(auth);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; filterChain.doFilter(req, res);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Next, create a class with the name JwtConfigurer for JWT configuration in configs package then replace all codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs;

import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.SecurityConfigurerAdapter;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.builders.HttpSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.web.DefaultSecurityFilterChain;
import org.springframework.security.web.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter;

public class JwtConfigurer extends SecurityConfigurerAdapter<DefaultSecurityFilterChain, HttpSecurity> {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

&nbsp; &nbsp; public JwtConfigurer(JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; this.jwtTokenProvider = jwtTokenProvider;
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @Override
&nbsp; &nbsp; public void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; JwtTokenFilter customFilter = new JwtTokenFilter(jwtTokenProvider);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; http.addFilterBefore(customFilter, UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter.class);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Finally, we have to configure the Spring Security by creating a Java class file inside configs package with the name WebSecurityConfig. Give annotations to this class and extends Spring WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter.

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
}

Inject JWT token provider inside this class.

@Autowired
JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

Add an override method to configure Authentication Manager Builder.

@Override
protected void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;UserDetailsService userDetailsService = mongoUserDetails();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;auth.userDetailsService(userDetailsService).passwordEncoder(bCryptPasswordEncoder());

}

Next, add an override method to configure Spring Security Http Security.

@Override
protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;http.httpBasic().disable().csrf().disable().sessionManagement()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS).and().authorizeRequests()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.antMatchers("/api/auth/login").permitAll().antMatchers("/api/auth/register").permitAll()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.antMatchers("/api/products/**").hasAuthority("ADMIN").anyRequest().authenticated().and().csrf()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.disable().exceptionHandling().authenticationEntryPoint(unauthorizedEntryPoint()).and()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.apply(new JwtConfigurer(jwtTokenProvider));
}

Next, declare all required beans for this configuration.

@Bean
public PasswordEncoder bCryptPasswordEncoder() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return new BCryptPasswordEncoder();
}

@Bean
@Override
public AuthenticationManager authenticationManagerBean() throws Exception {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return super.authenticationManagerBean();
}

@Bean
public AuthenticationEntryPoint unauthorizedEntryPoint() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return (request, response, authException) -> response.sendError(HttpServletResponse.SC_UNAUTHORIZED,
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;"Unauthorized");
}

@Bean
public UserDetailsService mongoUserDetails() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return new CustomUserDetailsService();
}

6. Create Product and Authentication Controllers

Now it’s time for REST API endpoint. All RESTful API will be created from each controller. Product controller will handle CRUD endpoint of product and Authentication controller will handle login and register endpoint. Right-click project name -> New -> Class then fill the package with com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers and the class name as ProductController. Open and edit the newly created class file then replace all codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers;

import java.util.Optional;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Product;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories.ProductRepository;

@RestController
public class ProductController {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp; &nbsp; ProductRepository productRepository;

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.GET, value="/api/products")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public Iterable<Product> product() {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return productRepository.findAll();
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.POST, value="/api/products")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public String save(@RequestBody Product product) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; productRepository.save(product);

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return product.getId();
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.GET, value="/api/products/{id}")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public Optional<Product> show(@PathVariable String id) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return productRepository.findById(id);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.PUT, value="/api/products/{id}")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public Product update(@PathVariable String id, @RequestBody Product product) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Optional<Product> prod = productRepository.findById(id);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdName() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdName(product.getProdName());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdDesc() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdDesc(product.getProdDesc());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdPrice() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdPrice(product.getProdPrice());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdImage() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdImage(product.getProdImage());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; productRepository.save(prod.get());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return prod.get();
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.DELETE, value="/api/products/{id}")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public String delete(@PathVariable String id) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Optional<Product> product = productRepository.findById(id);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; productRepository.delete(product.get());

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return "product deleted";
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

For login, we need to create a POJO to mapping required fields of User. Create a new class file with the name AuthBody inside controllers package then replace all Java codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers;

public class AuthBody {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private String email;
&nbsp; &nbsp; private String password;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getEmail() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setEmail(String email) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.email = email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getPassword() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setPassword(String password) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.password = password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

}

Finally, create a controller for authentication with the name AuthController inside the controllers’ package. Open and edit that newly created file then replace all Java codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers;

import static org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity.ok;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.AuthenticationManager;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.BadCredentialsException;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken;
import org.springframework.security.core.AuthenticationException;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PostMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs.JwtTokenProvider;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.User;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories.UserRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.services.CustomUserDetailsService;

@RestController
@RequestMapping("/api/auth")
public class AuthController {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;AuthenticationManager authenticationManager;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;UserRepository users;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private CustomUserDetailsService userService;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@PostMapping("/login")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public ResponseEntity login(@RequestBody AuthBody data) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;try {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;String username = data.getEmail();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;authenticationManager.authenticate(new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(username, data.getPassword()));
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;String token = jwtTokenProvider.createToken(username, this.users.findByEmail(username).getRoles());
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Map<Object, Object> model = new HashMap<>();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;model.put("username", username);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;model.put("token", token);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return ok(model);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;} catch (AuthenticationException e) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;throw new BadCredentialsException("Invalid email/password supplied");
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@PostMapping("/register")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public ResponseEntity register(@RequestBody User user) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;User userExists = userService.findUserByEmail(user.getEmail());
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;if (userExists != null) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;throw new BadCredentialsException("User with username: " + user.getEmail() + " already exists");
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;userService.saveUser(user);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Map<Object, Object> model = new HashMap<>();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;model.put("message", "User registered successfully");
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return ok(model);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
}

7. Run and Test Spring Boot Security Rest using Postman

Before run and test the application, we have to populate a Role data first. Open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/SecurityRestApplication.java then add these lines of codes inside the initialization method.

@Bean
CommandLineRunner init(RoleRepository roleRepository) {

&nbsp; &nbsp; return args -> {

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Role adminRole = roleRepository.findByRole("ADMIN");
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (adminRole == null) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Role newAdminRole = new Role();
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; newAdminRole.setRole("ADMIN");
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; roleRepository.save(newAdminRole);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; };

}

Next, make sure you have run the MongoDB server on your local machine then run the Gradle application using this command.

./gradlew bootRun

Or in STS just right-click the project name -> Run As -> Spring Boot App. Next, open the Postman application then change the method to GET and address to localhost:8080/api/products then click Send button.

You will see this response in the bottom panel of Postman.

{
&nbsp; &nbsp; "timestamp": "2019-03-07T13:16:34.935+0000",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "status": 401,
&nbsp; &nbsp; "error": "Unauthorized",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "message": "Unauthorized",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "path": "/api/products"
}

Next, change the method to POST then address to localhost:8080/api/auth/register then fill the body with raw data as below image then click Send button.

You will get the response in the bottom panel of Postman.

{
&nbsp; &nbsp; "message": "User registered successfully"
}

Next, change the address to localhost:8080/api/auth/login and change the body as below then click Send button.

{ "email":"[email&nbsp;protected]", "password": "q1w2we3r4" }

You will see this response in the bottom panel of Postman.

{
&nbsp; &nbsp; "username": "[email&nbsp;protected]",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "token": "eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWIiOiJpbmZvQGRqYW13YXJlLmNvbSIsInJvbGVzIjpbeyJpZCI6IjVjODBjNjIzYjIwMTkxNGIyYTY5N2U4ZCIsInJvbGUiOiJBRE1JTiJ9XSwiaWF0IjoxNTUxOTY0OTc3LCJleHAiOjE1NTE5Njg1Nzd9.j5CHZ_LCmeQtdxQeH9eluxVXcOsHPWV1p8WnBn0CULo"
}

Copy the token then back to the GET product. Add a header with the name Authorization and the value that paste from a token that gets by login with additional Bearer prefix (with space) as below.

Bearer eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWIiOiJpbmZvQGRqYW13YXJlLmNvbSIsInJvbGVzIjpbeyJpZCI6IjVjODBjNjIzYjIwMTkxNGIyYTY5N2U4ZCIsInJvbGUiOiJBRE1JTiJ9XSwiaWF0IjoxNTUxOTY0OTc3LCJleHAiOjE1NTE5Njg1Nzd9.j5CHZ_LCmeQtdxQeH9eluxVXcOsHPWV1p8WnBn0CULo

You should see this response after clicking the Send button.

[
&nbsp; &nbsp; {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "id": "5c80dc6cb20191520567b68a",
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodName": "Dummy Product 1",
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodDesc": "The Fresh Dummy Product in The world part 1",
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodPrice": 100,
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodImage": "https://dummyimage.com/600x400/000/fff"
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
]

You can test the POST product with the token in headers using the same way.

That it’s, the Securing RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB tutorial. You can get the full source code from our GitHub.

Learn More

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Creating RESTful APIs with NodeJS and MongoDB Tutorial

MongoDB with Python Crash Course - Tutorial for Beginners

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Angular 8 - JWT Authentication Example & Tutorial

Angular 8 - JWT Authentication Example & Tutorial

A Custom JWT Authentication Example built with Angular 8 and the Angular CLI

Angular CLI was used to generate the base project structure with the ng new command, the CLI is also used to build and serve the application. For more info about the Angular CLI see https://angular.io/cli.

Styling of the example app is all done with Bootstrap 4.3, for more info about Bootstrap see https://getbootstrap.com/docs/4.3/getting-started/introduction/.

Running the Angular 8 JWT Login Tutorial Example Locally
  1. Install NodeJS and NPM from https://nodejs.org/en/download/.
  2. Download or clone the tutorial project source code from https://github.com/cornflourblue/angular-8-jwt-authentication-example
  3. Install all required npm packages by running npm install from the command line in the project root folder (where the package.json is located).
  4. Start the application by running npm start from the
  5. command line in the project root folder, this will build the application
  6. and automatically launch it in the browser on the URL
  7. http://localhost:4200.

NOTE: You can also run the app directly using the Angular CLI command ng serve --open. To do this first install the Angular CLI globally on your system with the command npm install -g @angular/cli.

Running the Tutorial Example with a Real Backend API

The Angular 8 JWT example app uses a fake / mock backend by default so it can run in the browser without a real api, to switch to a real backend api you just have to remove or comment out the line below the comment // provider used to create fake backend located in the /src/app/app.module.ts file.

You can build your own backend api or start with one of the below options:

Angular 8 Tutorial Project Structure

The app and code structure of the tutorial mostly follows the best practice recommendations in the official Angular Style Guide, with a few of my own tweaks here and there.

Each feature has it's own folder (home & login), other shared/common code such as services, models, helpers etc are placed in folders prefixed with an underscore _ to easily differentiate them and group them together at the top of the folder structure.

The index.ts files in each folder are barrel files that group the exported modules from a folder together so they can be imported using the folder path instead of the full module path and to enable importing multiple modules in a single import (e.g. import { AuthenticationService, UserService } from '../_services').

Path aliases @app and @environments have been configured in tsconfig.json that map to the /src/app and /src/environments directories. This allows imports to be relative to the app and environments folders by prefixing import paths with aliases instead of having to use long relative paths (e.g. import MyComponent from '../../../MyComponent').

Here are the main project files that contain the application logic, I left out some files that were generated by Angular CLI ng new command that I didn't change.

  • src
  • app
  • _helpers
  • auth.guard.ts
  • error.interceptor.ts
  • fake-backend.ts
  • jwt.interceptor.ts
  • index.ts
  • _models
  • user.ts
  • index.ts
  • _services
  • authentication.service.ts
  • user.service.ts
  • index.ts
  • home
  • home.component.html
  • home.component.ts
  • index.ts
  • login
  • login.component.html
  • login.component.ts
  • index.ts
  • app.component.html
  • app.component.ts
  • app.module.ts
  • app.routing.ts
  • environments
  • environment.prod.ts
  • environment.ts
  • index.html
  • main.ts
  • polyfills.ts
  • styles.less
  • package.json
  • tsconfig.json
Auth Guard

Path: /src/app/_helpers/auth.guard.ts

The auth guard is an angular route guard that's used to prevent unauthenticated users from accessing restricted routes, it does this by implementing the CanActivate interface which allows the guard to decide if a route can be activated with the canActivate() method. If the method returns true the route is activated (allowed to proceed), otherwise if the method returns false the route is blocked.

The auth guard uses the authentication service to check if the user is logged in, if they are logged in it returns true from the canActivate() method, otherwise it returns false and redirects the user to the login page.

Angular route guards are attached to routes in the router config, this auth guard is used in app.routing.ts to protect the home page route.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { Router, CanActivate, ActivatedRouteSnapshot, RouterStateSnapshot } from '@angular/router';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class AuthGuard implements CanActivate {
    constructor(
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) { }

    canActivate(route: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, state: RouterStateSnapshot) {
        const currentUser = this.authenticationService.currentUserValue;
        if (currentUser) {
            // logged in so return true
            return true;
        }

        // not logged in so redirect to login page with the return url
        this.router.navigate(['/login'], { queryParams: { returnUrl: state.url } });
        return false;
    }
}
Http Error Interceptor

Path: /src/app/_helpers/error.interceptor.ts

The Error Interceptor intercepts http responses from the api to check if there were any errors. If there is a 401 Unauthorized response the user is automatically logged out of the application, all other errors are re-thrown up to the calling service so an alert with the error can be displayed on the screen.

It's implemented using the HttpInterceptor class included in the HttpClientModule, by extending the HttpInterceptor class you can create a custom interceptor to catch all error responses from the server in a single location.

Http interceptors are added to the request pipeline in the providers section of the app.module.ts file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable, throwError } from 'rxjs';
import { catchError } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable()
export class ErrorInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    constructor(private authenticationService: AuthenticationService) { }

    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        return next.handle(request).pipe(catchError(err => {
            if (err.status === 401) {
                // auto logout if 401 response returned from api
                this.authenticationService.logout();
                location.reload(true);
            }

            const error = err.error.message || err.statusText;
            return throwError(error);
        }))
    }
}
Fake Backend Provider

Path: /src/app/_helpers/fake-backend.ts

In order to run and test the Angular application without a real backend API, the example uses a fake backend that intercepts the HTTP requests from the Angular app and send back "fake" responses. This is done by a class that implements the Angular HttpInterceptor interface, for more information on Angular HTTP Interceptors see https://angular.io/api/common/http/HttpInterceptor or this article.

The fake backend contains a handleRoute function that checks if the request matches one of the faked routes in the switch statement, at the moment this includes POST requests to the /users/authenticate route for handling authentication, and GET requests to the /users route for getting all users.

Requests to the authenticate route are handled by the authenticate() function which checks the username and password against an array of hardcoded users. If the username and password are correct then an ok response is returned with the user details and a fake jwt token, otherwise an error response is returned.

Requests to the get users route are handled by the getUsers() function which checks if the user is logged in by calling the new isLoggedIn() helper function. If the user is logged in an ok() response with the whole users array is returned, otherwise a 401 Unauthorized response is returned by calling the new unauthorized() helper function.

If the request doesn't match any of the faked routes it is passed through as a real HTTP request to the backend API.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpResponse, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor, HTTP_INTERCEPTORS } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable, of, throwError } from 'rxjs';
import { delay, mergeMap, materialize, dematerialize } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { User } from '@app/_models';

const users: User[] = [{ id: 1, username: 'test', password: 'test', firstName: 'Test', lastName: 'User' }];

@Injectable()
export class FakeBackendInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        const { url, method, headers, body } = request;

        // wrap in delayed observable to simulate server api call
        return of(null)
            .pipe(mergeMap(handleRoute))
            .pipe(materialize()) // call materialize and dematerialize to ensure delay even if an error is thrown (https://github.com/Reactive-Extensions/RxJS/issues/648)
            .pipe(delay(500))
            .pipe(dematerialize());

        function handleRoute() {
            switch (true) {
                case url.endsWith('/users/authenticate') && method === 'POST':
                    return authenticate();
                case url.endsWith('/users') && method === 'GET':
                    return getUsers();
                default:
                    // pass through any requests not handled above
                    return next.handle(request);
            }    
        }

        // route functions

        function authenticate() {
            const { username, password } = body;
            const user = users.find(x => x.username === username && x.password === password);
            if (!user) return error('Username or password is incorrect');
            return ok({
                id: user.id,
                username: user.username,
                firstName: user.firstName,
                lastName: user.lastName,
                token: 'fake-jwt-token'
            })
        }

        function getUsers() {
            if (!isLoggedIn()) return unauthorized();
            return ok(users);
        }

        // helper functions

        function ok(body?) {
            return of(new HttpResponse({ status: 200, body }))
        }

        function error(message) {
            return throwError({ error: { message } });
        }

        function unauthorized() {
            return throwError({ status: 401, error: { message: 'Unauthorised' } });
        }

        function isLoggedIn() {
            return headers.get('Authorization') === 'Bearer fake-jwt-token';
        }
    }
}

export let fakeBackendProvider = {
    // use fake backend in place of Http service for backend-less development
    provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS,
    useClass: FakeBackendInterceptor,
    multi: true
};
JWT Interceptor

Path: /src/app/_helpers/jwt.interceptor.ts

The JWT Interceptor intercepts http requests from the application to add a JWT auth token to the Authorization header if the user is logged in.

It's implemented using the HttpInterceptor class included in the HttpClientModule, by extending the HttpInterceptor class you can create a custom interceptor to modify http requests before they get sent to the server.

Http interceptors are added to the request pipeline in the providers section of the app.module.ts file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable } from 'rxjs';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable()
export class JwtInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    constructor(private authenticationService: AuthenticationService) { }

    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        // add authorization header with jwt token if available
        let currentUser = this.authenticationService.currentUserValue;
        if (currentUser && currentUser.token) {
            request = request.clone({
                setHeaders: {
                    Authorization: `Bearer ${currentUser.token}`
                }
            });
        }

        return next.handle(request);
    }
}
User Model

Path: /src/app/_models/user.ts

The user model is a small class that defines the properties of a user.

export class User {
    id: number;
    username: string;
    password: string;
    firstName: string;
    lastName: string;
    token?: string;
}
Authentication Service

Path: /src/app/_services/authentication.service.ts

The authentication service is used to login & logout of the Angular app, it notifies other components when the user logs in & out, and allows access the currently logged in user.

RxJS Subjects and Observables are used to store the current user object and notify other components when the user logs in and out of the app. Angular components can subscribe() to the public currentUser: Observable property to be notified of changes, and notifications are sent when the this.currentUserSubject.next() method is called in the login() and logout() methods, passing the argument to each subscriber. The RxJS BehaviorSubject is a special type of Subject that keeps hold of the current value and emits it to any new subscribers as soon as they subscribe, while regular Subjects don't store the current value and only emit values that are published after a subscription is created.

The login() method sends the user credentials to the API via an HTTP POST request for authentication. If successful the user object including a JWT auth token are stored in localStorage to keep the user logged in between page refreshes. The user object is then published to all subscribers with the call to this.currentUserSubject.next(user);.

The constructor() of the service initialises the currentUserSubject with the currentUser object from localStorage which enables the user to stay logged in between page refreshes or after the browser is closed. The public currentUser property is then set to this.currentUserSubject.asObservable(); which allows other components to subscribe to the currentUser Observable but doesn't allow them to publish to the currentUserSubject, this is so logging in and out of the app can only be done via the authentication service.

The currentUserValue getter allows other components an easy way to get the value of the currently logged in user without having to subscribe to the currentUser Observable.

The logout() method removes the current user object from local storage and publishes null to the currentUserSubject to notify all subscribers that the user has logged out.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpClient } from '@angular/common/http';
import { BehaviorSubject, Observable } from 'rxjs';
import { map } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { environment } from '@environments/environment';
import { User } from '@app/_models';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class AuthenticationService {
    private currentUserSubject: BehaviorSubject;
    public currentUser: Observable;

    constructor(private http: HttpClient) {
        this.currentUserSubject = new BehaviorSubject(JSON.parse(localStorage.getItem('currentUser')));
        this.currentUser = this.currentUserSubject.asObservable();
    }

    public get currentUserValue(): User {
        return this.currentUserSubject.value;
    }

    login(username: string, password: string) {
        return this.http.post(`${environment.apiUrl}/users/authenticate`, { username, password })
            .pipe(map(user => {
                // store user details and jwt token in local storage to keep user logged in between page refreshes
                localStorage.setItem('currentUser', JSON.stringify(user));
                this.currentUserSubject.next(user);
                return user;
            }));
    }

    logout() {
        // remove user from local storage to log user out
        localStorage.removeItem('currentUser');
        this.currentUserSubject.next(null);
    }
}
User Service

Path: /src/app/_services/user.service.ts

The user service contains a method for getting all users from the api, I included it to demonstrate accessing a secure api endpoint with the http authorization header set after logging in to the application, the auth header is set with a JWT token with the JWT Interceptor above. The secure endpoint in the example is a fake one implemented in the fake backend provider above.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpClient } from '@angular/common/http';

import { environment } from '@environments/environment';
import { User } from '@app/_models';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class UserService {
    constructor(private http: HttpClient) { }

    getAll() {
        return this.http.get(`${environment.apiUrl}/users`);
    }
}
Home Component Template

Path: /src/app/home/home.component.html

The home component template contains html and angular 8 template syntax for displaying a simple welcome message and a list of users from a secure api endpoint.


    #### You're logged in with Angular 8 & JWT!!

    
        ###### Users from secure api end point

        

        
            {{user.firstName}} {{user.lastName}}
        
    

Home Component

Path: /src/app/home/home.component.ts

The home component defines an angular 8 component that gets all users from the user service and makes them available to the template via a users array property.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { first } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { User } from '@app/_models';
import { UserService, AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Component({ templateUrl: 'home.component.html' })
export class HomeComponent {
    loading = false;
    users: User[];

    constructor(private userService: UserService) { }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.loading = true;
        this.userService.getAll().pipe(first()).subscribe(users => {
            this.loading = false;
            this.users = users;
        });
    }
}
Login Component Template

Path: /src/app/login/login.component.html

The login component template contains a login form with username and password fields. It displays validation messages for invalid fields when the submit button is clicked. The form submit event is bound to the onSubmit() method of the login component.


    
        Username: test

        Password: test
    
    
        #### Angular 8 JWT Login Example

        
            
                
                    Username
                    
                    
                        Username is required

                    
                
                
                    Password
                    
                    
                        Password is required

                    
                
                
                    
                    Login
                
                {{error}}

            
        
    

Login Component

Path: /src/app/login/login.component.ts

The login component uses the authentication service to login to the application. If the user is already logged in they are automatically redirected to the home page.

The loginForm: FormGroup object defines the form controls and validators, and is used to access data entered into the form. The FormGroup is part of the Angular Reactive Forms module and is bound to the login template above with the [formGroup]="loginForm" directive.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { Router, ActivatedRoute } from '@angular/router';
import { FormBuilder, FormGroup, Validators } from '@angular/forms';
import { first } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Component({ templateUrl: 'login.component.html' })
export class LoginComponent implements OnInit {
    loginForm: FormGroup;
    loading = false;
    submitted = false;
    returnUrl: string;
    error = '';

    constructor(
        private formBuilder: FormBuilder,
        private route: ActivatedRoute,
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) { 
        // redirect to home if already logged in
        if (this.authenticationService.currentUserValue) { 
            this.router.navigate(['/']);
        }
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.loginForm = this.formBuilder.group({
            username: ['', Validators.required],
            password: ['', Validators.required]
        });

        // get return url from route parameters or default to '/'
        this.returnUrl = this.route.snapshot.queryParams['returnUrl'] || '/';
    }

    // convenience getter for easy access to form fields
    get f() { return this.loginForm.controls; }

    onSubmit() {
        this.submitted = true;

        // stop here if form is invalid
        if (this.loginForm.invalid) {
            return;
        }

        this.loading = true;
        this.authenticationService.login(this.f.username.value, this.f.password.value)
            .pipe(first())
            .subscribe(
                data => {
                    this.router.navigate([this.returnUrl]);
                },
                error => {
                    this.error = error;
                    this.loading = false;
                });
    }
}
App Component Template

Path: /src/app/app.component.html

The app component template is the root component template of the application, it contains the main nav bar which is only displayed for authenticated users, and a router-outlet directive for displaying the contents of each view based on the current route / path.



    
        Home
        Logout
    




    

App Component

Path: /src/app/app.component.ts

The app component is the root component of the application, it defines the root tag of the app as `` with the selector property of the @Component() decorator.

It subscribes to the currentUser observable in the authentication service so it can reactively show/hide the main navigation bar when the user logs in/out of the application. I didn't worry about unsubscribing from the observable here because it's the root component of the application, the only time the component will be destroyed is when the application is closed which would destroy any subscriptions as well.

The app component contains a logout() method which is called from the logout link in the main nav bar above to log the user out and redirect them to the login page.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { Router } from '@angular/router';

import { AuthenticationService } from './_services';
import { User } from './_models';

@Component({ selector: 'app', templateUrl: 'app.component.html' })
export class AppComponent {
    currentUser: User;

    constructor(
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) {
        this.authenticationService.currentUser.subscribe(x => this.currentUser = x);
    }

    logout() {
        this.authenticationService.logout();
        this.router.navigate(['/login']);
    }
}
App Module

Path: /src/app/app.module.ts

The app module defines the root module of the application along with metadata about the module. For more info about angular 8 modules check out this page on the official docs site.

This is where the fake backend provider is added to the application, to switch to a real backend simply remove the providers located below the comment // provider used to create fake backend.

import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { ReactiveFormsModule } from '@angular/forms';
import { HttpClientModule, HTTP_INTERCEPTORS } from '@angular/common/http';

// used to create fake backend
import { fakeBackendProvider } from './_helpers';

import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
import { appRoutingModule } from './app.routing';

import { JwtInterceptor, ErrorInterceptor } from './_helpers';
import { HomeComponent } from './home';
import { LoginComponent } from './login';

@NgModule({
    imports: [
        BrowserModule,
        ReactiveFormsModule,
        HttpClientModule,
        appRoutingModule
    ],
    declarations: [
        AppComponent,
        HomeComponent,
        LoginComponent
    ],
    providers: [
        { provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS, useClass: JwtInterceptor, multi: true },
        { provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS, useClass: ErrorInterceptor, multi: true },

        // provider used to create fake backend
        fakeBackendProvider
    ],
    bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }
App Routing Module

Path: /src/app/app.routing.ts

Routing for the Angular app is configured as an array of Routes, each component is mapped to a path so the Angular Router knows which component to display based on the URL in the browser address bar. The home route is secured by passing the AuthGuard to the canActivate property of the route.

The Routes array is passed to the RouterModule.forRoot() method which creates a routing module with all of the app routes configured, and also includes all of the Angular Router providers and directives such as the `` directive. For more information on Angular Routing and Navigation see https://angular.io/guide/router.

import { Routes, RouterModule } from '@angular/router';

import { HomeComponent } from './home';
import { LoginComponent } from './login';
import { AuthGuard } from './_helpers';

const routes: Routes = [
    { path: '', component: HomeComponent, canActivate: [AuthGuard] },
    { path: 'login', component: LoginComponent },

    // otherwise redirect to home
    { path: '**', redirectTo: '' }
];

export const appRoutingModule = RouterModule.forRoot(routes);
Production Environment Config

Path: /src/environments/environment.prod.ts

The production environment config contains variables required to run the application in production. This enables you to build the application with a different configuration for each different environment (e.g. production & development) without updating the app code.

When you build the application for production with the command ng build --prod, the output environment.ts is replaced with environment.prod.ts.

export const environment = {
    production: true,
    apiUrl: 'http://localhost:4000'
};
Development Environment Config

Path: /src/environments/environment.ts

The development environment config contains variables required to run the application in development.

Environment config is accessed by importing the environment object into any Angular service of component with the line import { environment } from '@environments/environment' and accessing properties on the environment object, see the user service for an example.

export const environment = {
    production: false,
    apiUrl: 'http://localhost:4000'
};
Main Index Html File

Path: /src/index.html

The main index.html file is the initial page loaded by the browser that kicks everything off. The Angular CLI (with Webpack under the hood) bundles all of the compiled javascript files together and injects them into the body of the index.html page so the scripts can be loaded and executed by the browser.




    
    Angular 8 - JWT Authentication Tutorial & Example
    

    
    


    Loading...


Main (Bootstrap) File

Path: /src/main.ts

The main file is the entry point used by angular to launch and bootstrap the application.

import { enableProdMode } from '@angular/core';
import { platformBrowserDynamic } from '@angular/platform-browser-dynamic';

import { AppModule } from './app/app.module';
import { environment } from './environments/environment';

if (environment.production) {
    enableProdMode();
}

platformBrowserDynamic().bootstrapModule(AppModule)
    .catch(err => console.error(err));
Polyfills

Path: /src/polyfills.ts

Some features used by Angular 8 are not yet supported natively by all major browsers, polyfills are used to add support for features where necessary so your Angular 8 application works across all major browsers.

This file is generated by the Angular CLI when creating a new project with the ng new command, I've excluded the comments in the file for brevity.

import 'zone.js/dist/zone';
Global LESS/CSS Styles

Path: /src/styles.less

The global styles file contains LESS/CSS styles that are applied globally throughout the application.

/* You can add global styles to this file, and also import other style files */
a { cursor: pointer }
npm package.json

Path: /package.json

The package.json file contains project configuration information including package dependencies which get installed when you run npm install. Full documentation is available on the npm docs website.

{
    "name": "angular-8-jwt-authentication-example",
    "version": "1.0.0",
    "scripts": {
        "ng": "ng",
        "start": "ng serve --open",
        "build": "ng build",
        "test": "ng test",
        "lint": "ng lint",
        "e2e": "ng e2e"
    },
    "private": true,
    "dependencies": {
        "@angular/animations": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/common": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/compiler": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/core": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/forms": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/platform-browser": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/router": "~8.0.1",
        "rxjs": "~6.4.0",
        "tslib": "^1.9.0",
        "zone.js": "~0.9.1"
    },
    "devDependencies": {
        "@angular-devkit/build-angular": "~0.800.0",
        "@angular/cli": "~8.0.3",
        "@angular/compiler-cli": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/language-service": "~8.0.1",
        "@types/node": "~8.9.4",
        "@types/jasmine": "~3.3.8",
        "@types/jasminewd2": "~2.0.3",
        "codelyzer": "^5.0.0",
        "jasmine-core": "~3.4.0",
        "jasmine-spec-reporter": "~4.2.1",
        "karma": "~4.1.0",
        "karma-chrome-launcher": "~2.2.0",
        "karma-coverage-istanbul-reporter": "~2.0.1",
        "karma-jasmine": "~2.0.1",
        "karma-jasmine-html-reporter": "^1.4.0",
        "protractor": "~5.4.0",
        "ts-node": "~7.0.0",
        "tslint": "~5.15.0",
        "typescript": "~3.4.3"
    }
}
TypeScript tsconfig.json

Path: /tsconfig.json

The tsconfig.json file configures how the TypeScript compiler will convert TypeScript into JavaScript that is understood by the browser. More information is available on the TypeScript docs.

Most of the file is unchanged from when it was generated by the Angular CLI, only the paths property has been added to map @app and @environments to the /src/app and /src/environments directories. This allows imports to be relative to the app and environments folders by prefixing import paths with aliases instead of having to use long relative paths (e.g. import MyComponent from '../../../MyComponent').

{
    "compileOnSave": false,
    "compilerOptions": {
        "baseUrl": "./",
        "outDir": "./dist/out-tsc",
        "sourceMap": true,
        "declaration": false,
        "downlevelIteration": true,
        "emitDecoratorMetadata": true,
        "experimentalDecorators": true,
        "module": "esnext",
        "moduleResolution": "node",
        "importHelpers": true,
        "target": "es2015",
        "typeRoots": [
            "node_modules/@types"
        ],
        "lib": [
            "es2018",
            "dom"
        ],
        "paths": {
            "@app/*": ["src/app/*"],
            "@environments/*": ["src/environments/*"]
        }
    }
}

The tutorial code is available on GitHub at https://github.com/cornflourblue/angular-8-jwt-authentication-example.

Angular 8 JWT User Authentication Tutorial

Angular 8 JWT User Authentication Tutorial

In this step-by-step Angular 8/9 tutorial, we are going to understand how to build a secure user authentication system using JSON web tokens (JWT) and RESTful Auth APIs built with express, node and mongoDB.

**Welcome, fellas! Today, In this step-by-step Angular 8/9 tutorial, we are going to understand how to build a secure user authentication system using JSON web tokens (JWT) and RESTful Auth APIs built with express, node and mongoDB.

What is JWT (JSON Web Token)?

JWT refers to JSON Web token. It’s a token in string form validated and generated by a web server. This string-based token helps in communicating between the client and the server.

Let’s understand how does the JWT help in transferring the data securely between the client and the server.

User information is sent to the client like username and password using an HTTP POST request to the webserver. Web server identifies the user information and creates a token and send it back to the client. Client store that token into local storage or a session and also set it to the header. On the next HTTP call, that token is verified by the server, and web server returns the response to the client.

Angular 8/9 MEAN Stack User Authentication Work Flow
  • User can sign-in
  • User can register or sign-up
  • Store user data on MongoDB database.
  • Creating Angular service to handle user auth API.
  • Hide certain menu item based on authentication state
  • Restrict user to access user profile page when the user is not logged-in.
  • Store JWT token in local storage to manage the user session in Angular 8/9
  • Store password in mongoDB Database using the password hash method with bcryptjs.
  • Generate a JSON web token when a user logs in and store that token in a authorization header using HttpInterceptor class.

Click below to get the full code of this tutorial on GitHub.

Git Repo

Table of contents

  1. Set up Angular Project
  2. Clone Node Js Token-Based Auth REST API from GitHub
  3. Setting up HttpClient
  4. Creating Angular User Authentication Service
  5. Set JWT Token with Angular 8 HttpInterceptor
  6. Protect Routes with CanActivate
  7. Implement Reactive Forms
  8. Implementing User Registration in MEAN Stack App
  9. Handling MEAN Stack Login with Angular
  10. Fetch User Profile in Angular Auth App
  11. Conclusion
Set up Angular Project

Let’s get started by installing the basic Angular app, enter the following command in your terminal:

ng new angular-meanstack-authentication

# ? Would you like to add Angular routing? Yes
# ? Which stylesheet format would you like to use? CSS

Next, head over to the Angular user authentication project folder:

cd angular-meanstack-authentication

To make things simpler create a separate front-end and backend (server) in Angular app. Our Angular 8/9 user auth app will have signin, signup and user-profile pages.

Create specific components folder in src/app/components in Angular app and create the following components in it.

ng g c components/signin

ng g c components/signup

ng g c components/user-profile

Next, install Bootstrap 4.

npm install bootstrap

Add the Bootstrap 4 stylesheet path in angular.json file.

"styles": [
          "node_modules/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css",
          "src/styles.css"
         ]

Start your Angular app.

ng serve --open

Clone Node Js Token-Based Auth REST API from GitHub

Run the following command to clone Node.js token-based auth REST API from GitHub in your Angular’s root folder.

git clone https://github.com/SinghDigamber/node-token-based-authentication.git

Get inside the server folder:

cd node-token-based-authentication

Next, install npm packages to set up and start the Node server:

Run npm install to install required packages

Open other terminal run mongod

Next, install the nodemon NPM package for development purpose with --save-dev attribute, it helps in starting the node server when any change occurs in the server files.

npm install nodemon --save-dev

Open terminal run nodemon

Following auth APIs we are going to use in this tutorial.

Open API URL on http://localhost:4000/api

Setting up HttpClient

To handle REST APIs via HTTP requests in our Angular user authentication app. We need to import Angular HttpClient service in the auth module.

Import HttpClientModule service in app.module.ts file.

import { HttpClientModule } from '@angular/common/http';

@NgModule({
  imports: [
    HttpClientModule
   ]
})
Creating Angular User Authentication Service

Now create Angular auth service and user class, these files will handle all the JWT user authentication related APIs in our project.

Inside the shared folder create shared/user.ts file and include the following code inside of it.

export class User {
    _id: String;
    name: String;
    email: String;
    password: String;
}

Next, run below command to create user auth service.

ng g s shared/auth

Add the following code in the shared/auth.service.ts file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { User } from './user';
import { Observable, throwError } from 'rxjs';
import { catchError, map } from 'rxjs/operators';
import { HttpClient, HttpHeaders, HttpErrorResponse } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Router } from '@angular/router';

@Injectable({
  providedIn: 'root'
})

export class AuthService {
  endpoint: string = 'http://localhost:4000/api';
  headers = new HttpHeaders().set('Content-Type', 'application/json');
  currentUser = {};

  constructor(
    private http: HttpClient,
    public router: Router
  ) {
  }

  // Sign-up
  signUp(user: User): Observable<any> {
    let api = `${this.endpoint}/register-user`;
    return this.http.post(api, user)
      .pipe(
        catchError(this.handleError)
      )
  }

  // Sign-in
  signIn(user: User) {
    return this.http.post<any>(`${this.endpoint}/signin`, user)
      .subscribe((res: any) => {
        localStorage.setItem('access_token', res.token)
        this.getUserProfile(res._id).subscribe((res) => {
          this.currentUser = res;
          this.router.navigate(['user-profile/' + res.msg._id]);
        })
      })
  }

  getToken() {
    return localStorage.getItem('access_token');
  }

  get isLoggedIn(): boolean {
    let authToken = localStorage.getItem('access_token');
    return (authToken !== null) ? true : false;
  }

  doLogout() {
    let removeToken = localStorage.removeItem('access_token');
    if (removeToken == null) {
      this.router.navigate(['log-in']);
    }
  }

  // User profile
  getUserProfile(id): Observable<any> {
    let api = `${this.endpoint}/user-profile/${id}`;
    return this.http.get(api, { headers: this.headers }).pipe(
      map((res: Response) => {
        return res || {}
      }),
      catchError(this.handleError)
    )
  }

  // Error 
  handleError(error: HttpErrorResponse) {
    let msg = '';
    if (error.error instanceof ErrorEvent) {
      // client-side error
      msg = error.error.message;
    } else {
      // server-side error
      msg = `Error Code: ${error.status}\nMessage: ${error.message}`;
    }
    return throwError(msg);
  }
}
  • The signUp() method stores the user name, email and password in mongoDB database.
  • By taking the help of bcryptjs, we are storing the password securely in the database.
  • The signin() method allows the user to access in the app using JSON web token generated by node server.
  • We are getting JWT token from the API response and storing in the local storage, then in the getToken() method, we are accessing the token via local storage getItem() method.
  • The isLoggedIn method returns true if the user is logged in else returns false.
Set JWT Token with Angular 8 HttpInterceptor

In this part of the tutorial, we are going to set the JSON web token in the header using Angular 8/9 HttpInterceptor. To set the authorization header, first create the authconfig.interceptor.ts file in the shared folder.

import { Injectable } from "@angular/core";
import { HttpInterceptor, HttpRequest, HttpHandler } from "@angular/common/http";
import { AuthService } from "./auth.service";

@Injectable()

export class AuthInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    constructor(private authService: AuthService) { }

    intercept(req: HttpRequest<any>, next: HttpHandler) {
        const authToken = this.authService.getToken();
        req = req.clone({
            setHeaders: {
                Authorization: "Bearer " + authToken
            }
        });
        return next.handle(req);
    }
}

Import the AuthService in and inject inside the constructor. In the intercept(){…} method call the getToken() method to get the JWT token then within the req.clone method set the Authorization header and call teh next.handle() method.

import { HttpClientModule, HTTP_INTERCEPTORS } from '@angular/common/http';
import { AuthInterceptor } from './shared/authconfig.interceptor';

@NgModule({
  declarations: [...],
  imports: [HttpClientModule],
  providers: [
    {
      provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS,
      useClass: AuthInterceptor,
      multi: true
    }
  ],
  bootstrap: [...]
})

export class AppModule { }

Next, import the HTTP_INTERCEPTORS in the app.module.ts file and set the HTTP_INTERCEPTORS along with AuthInterceptor in providers:[...] array.

Protect Routes with CanActivate

Run following command to set up CanActivate interface class, It stops visitors to access certain urls in the Angular app. In our case we only want logged-in users to access the /user-profile URL.

ng g guard shared/auth

Next, add the following code in the auth.guard.ts file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { ActivatedRouteSnapshot, RouterStateSnapshot, 
UrlTree, CanActivate, Router } from '@angular/router';
import { Observable } from 'rxjs';
import { AuthService } from './../shared/auth.service';

@Injectable({
  providedIn: 'root'
})
export class AuthGuard implements CanActivate {

  constructor(
    public authService: AuthService,
    public router: Router
  ) { }

  canActivate(
    next: ActivatedRouteSnapshot,
    state: RouterStateSnapshot): Observable<boolean> | Promise<boolean> | boolean {
    if (this.authService.isLoggedIn !== true) {
      window.alert("Access not allowed!");
      this.router.navigate(['log-in'])
    }
    return true;
  }
}

Then, go to app-routing.module.ts file and import the AuthGuard interface class and inject the AuthGuard in the route as given below.

import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { Routes, RouterModule } from '@angular/router';

import { SigninComponent } from './components/signin/signin.component';
import { SignupComponent } from './components/signup/signup.component';
import { UserProfileComponent } from './components/user-profile/user-profile.component';

import { AuthGuard } from "./shared/auth.guard";

const routes: Routes = [
  { path: '', redirectTo: '/log-in', pathMatch: 'full' },
  { path: 'log-in', component: SigninComponent },
  { path: 'sign-up', component: SignupComponent },
  { path: 'user-profile/:id', component: UserProfileComponent, canActivate: [AuthGuard] }
];

@NgModule({
  imports: [RouterModule.forRoot(routes)],
  exports: [RouterModule]
})

export class AppRoutingModule { }
Implement Reactive Forms

Import ReactiveFormsModule and FormsModule in app.module.ts file and also declare in imports: […] array. Check out more about Reactive forms in Angular 8/9

import { ReactiveFormsModule, FormsModule } from '@angular/forms';

@NgModule({
  imports: [
    ReactiveFormsModule,
    FormsModule
  ],
})

export class AppModule { }
Implementing User Registration in MEAN Stack App

Now, implement user registration in MEAN stack auth app using Node API. Go to components/signup.component.ts file and add the following code.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { FormBuilder, FormGroup } from "@angular/forms";
import { AuthService } from './../../shared/auth.service';
import { Router } from '@angular/router';

@Component({
  selector: 'app-signup',
  templateUrl: './signup.component.html',
  styleUrls: ['./signup.component.css']
})

export class SignupComponent implements OnInit {
  signupForm: FormGroup;

  constructor(
    public fb: FormBuilder,
    public authService: AuthService,
    public router: Router
  ) {
    this.signupForm = this.fb.group({
      name: [''],
      email: [''],
      mobile: [''],
      password: ['']
    })
  }

  ngOnInit() { }

  registerUser() {
    this.authService.signUp(this.signupForm.value).subscribe((res) => {
      if (res.result) {
        this.signupForm.reset()
        this.router.navigate(['log-in']);
      }
    })
  }
}

Go to components/signup.component.html file and add the following code inside of it.

<div class="auth-wrapper">
    <form class="form-signin" [formGroup]="signupForm" (ngSubmit)="registerUser()">
        <h3 class="h3 mb-3 font-weight-normal text-center">Please sign up</h3>
        <div class="form-group">
            <label>Name</label>
            <input type="text" class="form-control" formControlName="name" placeholder="Enter name" required>
        </div>
        <div class="form-group">
            <label>Email address</label>
            <input type="email" class="form-control" formControlName="email" placeholder="Enter email" required>
        </div>
        <div class="form-group">
            <label>Password</label>
            <input type="password" class="form-control" formControlName="password" placeholder="Password" required>
        </div>
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-block btn-primary">Sign up</button>
    </form>
</div>

Call the signUp() method to register the user via the registerUser() method. On successful user registration redirect user to the log-in page.

User Registration in MEAN Stack App

Handling MEAN Stack Login with Angular

In this step, we will implement MEAN stack login in an Angular 8/9 app. Go to components/signin.component.ts file and add the following code.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { FormBuilder, FormGroup } from "@angular/forms";
import { AuthService } from './../../shared/auth.service';
import { Router } from '@angular/router';

@Component({
  selector: 'app-signin',
  templateUrl: './signin.component.html',
  styleUrls: ['./signin.component.css']
})

export class SigninComponent implements OnInit {
  signinForm: FormGroup;

  constructor(
    public fb: FormBuilder,
    public authService: AuthService,
    public router: Router
  ) {
    this.signinForm = this.fb.group({
      email: [''],
      password: ['']
    })
  }

  ngOnInit() { }

  loginUser() {
    this.authService.signIn(this.signinForm.value)
  }
}

Head over to components/signin.component.html file and add the following code inside of it.

<div class="auth-wrapper">
    <form class="form-signin" [formGroup]="signinForm" (ngSubmit)="loginUser()">
        <h3 class="h3 mb-3 font-weight-normal text-center">Please sign in</h3>
        <div class="form-group">
            <label>Email</label>
            <input type="email" class="form-control" formControlName="email" placeholder="Enter email" required>
        </div>
        <div class="form-group">
            <label>Password</label>
            <input type="password" class="form-control" formControlName="password" placeholder="Password">
        </div>
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-block btn-primary">Sign in</button>
    </form>
</div>

Enter the user email and password, we are setting up Authorization: Bearer token in the header when the user successfully logged-in.

Angular 8 MEAN Stack Login

Fetch User Profile in Angular Auth App

Now, we will fetch the user data when the user is successfully logged in. In server/ /middlewares/auth.js file we have set the jwt.verify() method. This method checks the API request and does not render the user data if found invalid token or JWT secret.

For example try to access the /user-profile/_id Angular URL without providing the invalid token. You will find out that server doesn’t render the user data.

Get into the components/user-profile.component.ts file and include the following code inside of it.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { ActivatedRoute } from '@angular/router';
import { AuthService } from './../../shared/auth.service';

@Component({
  selector: 'app-user-profile',
  templateUrl: './user-profile.component.html',
  styleUrls: ['./user-profile.component.css']
})

export class UserProfileComponent implements OnInit {
  currentUser: Object = {};

  constructor(
    public authService: AuthService,
    private actRoute: ActivatedRoute
  ) {
    let id = this.actRoute.snapshot.paramMap.get('id');
    this.authService.getUserProfile(id).subscribe(res => {
      this.currentUser = res.msg;
    })
  }

  ngOnInit() { }
}

Get into the components/user-profile.component.html file and include the following code inside of it.

<div class="container">
    <div class="row">
        <div class="inner-main">
            <h2 class="mb-4">User Profile</h2>
            <p><strong>Name:</strong> {{this.currentUser.name}}</p>
            <p><strong>Email:</strong> {{this.currentUser.email}}</p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

MEAN Auth User Profile

Adding Logout in MEAN App

In this step, we will add the logout, hiding and showing nav items in our MEAN stack user authentication app.

Go to app/app.component.ts file and add the following code inside of it.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { AuthService } from './shared/auth.service';

@Component({
  selector: 'app-root',
  templateUrl: './app.component.html',
  styleUrls: ['./app.component.css']
})

export class AppComponent {

  constructor(public authService: AuthService) { }

  logout() {
    this.authService.doLogout()
  }
}

Go to app/app.component.html file and add the following code inside of it.

<div
  class="d-flex flex-column flex-md-row align-items-center p-3 px-md-4 mb-3 bg-white border-bottom shadow-sm fixed-top">
  <h5 class="my-0 mr-md-auto font-weight-normal">Angular Mean Auth</h5>
  <nav class="my-2 my-md-0 mr-md-3">
    <a *ngIf="this.authService.isLoggedIn" class="p-2 text-dark">User Profile</a>
    <a *ngIf="!this.authService.isLoggedIn" class="p-2 text-dark" routerLinkActive="active" routerLink="/log-in">Sign
      in</a>
  </nav>
  <a *ngIf="!this.authService.isLoggedIn" class="btn btn-outline-primary" routerLinkActive="active"
    routerLinkActive="active" routerLink="/sign-up">Sign up</a>
  <button (click)="logout()" *ngIf="this.authService.isLoggedIn" type="button" class="btn btn-danger">Logout</button>
</div>

<router-outlet></router-outlet>

Conclusion

Finally, we completed the Angular 8 JWT User Authentication Tutorial. In this tutorial, we have learned how to implement JWT user authentication in Angular 8/9 application.

AWS Certified Solution Architect Associate

AWS Certified Solution Architect Associate

This course will help you in the final preparation steps for your AWS Certified Solution Architect Associate - Certification Exam.

In this course , we will go through the different concepts that get asked in the exam and map them to the different domain objectives for the exam.

This is good revision guide before you attempt the certification exam

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