Vern  Greenholt

Vern Greenholt

1593371251

Using Bitbucket for WordPress Continuous Deployment

If you are anything like me, you spent the first leg of your WordPress development years “cowboy coding”—that is, making changes wildly on live sites, urgently testing and firing them up with FTP, often resulting in 500 Internal Server Error messages and sitewide breaks all visible to your esteemed visitors.

While this was absolutely thrilling as adrenaline pumped through your fingers, pounding in that forgotten semicolon, on sites with more than 0 visitors (who actually noticed the downtime) this would start to become a problem. If a tree falls and no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? Depends on the theory of humanity to which you subscribe.

However, if a site crashes and someone is there to see it, they will certainly make a sound.

WordPress Continuous Deployment Done Wrong

Enter staging sites, duplicate WordPress installations (at least in theory) where changes could be made, then made again on the live site once all was confirmed working. While this quieted down visitors, it started to cause us developers to make some noise. Suddenly, we needed to keep track of two sites, ensure that the code is manually synced between them, and test everything again to make sure it is working on the live site. Long, messy lists of “make sure to change this on live” and “make sure to toggle this on the staging site before copying the code over” were nerve-wracking, to say the least. Backups of this system were a nightmare as well—a slew of folders named “my-theme-staging-1” and “my-theme-live-before-menu-restyle-3” and so on. There had to be a better way, and there was.

There was Git, which gives perfect source control and other features to developers. Using version control for WordPress installations instantly expedited and cleaned up development, as hours were no longer spent backing up in a per-developer system but actually on coding. Changes were saved and I could finally add meaningful messages to my work, worlds of difference from “my-theme-4-v2.”

While the codebase was a lot cleaner, the issue still remained of actual deployments and ensuring the site in question was using the latest code—enter opportunity-for-human-error. Still relying on manual FTP uploads overwriting the previous code didn’t feel great. While other CI/CD services existed, many of them came with a substantial price tag and large amount of setup—server refiguring, relying on yet another service for even the simplest website, learning the other service’s whole “way of doing things” and all the idiosyncrasies that come with it.

While similar setups to this tutorial can be done with GitHub/GitLab and other services, I had put my eggs in the Atlassian basket early on due to their free private repositories (which has only been a recent offering from GitHub). When Bitbucket introduced their Pipelines and Deployments services, it allowed new code to automatically deploy to staging or production sites (or any other site in-between) without reuploading via FTP or using an external service. Devs could now use all of the values of source control in their WordPress development and instantly send those changes to the appropriate destinations with no additional clicks or keystrokes, with the status of everything all visible via one dashboard. This ensures everything stays in sync and, at a glance, lets you know exactly what code each site is running. Plus, the pricing for Bitbucket’s build minutes is incredibly affordable—with 50 minutes free per month and an option for a “Free with Overages” plan.

It took a bit of startup time to work out how to best use branches and other features of source control in this new model and the particulars of the Bitbucket Pipelines setup. Here’s the process I use for starting new WordPress projects. I won’t go into all of the nitty-gritty on setting up git and WordPress installation since great resources for that are just a Google search away. In the end, the content flow will be something like this:

Wordpress Bitbucket screenshot 1

The Alexa Green WordPress Depoyment Routine

The steps outlined here should be performed as needed:

On the Client’s Server

Set up a domain for the live site (e.g., clientsite.com) and subdomain for staging (e.g., staging.clientsite.com).

Install WordPress on both the live site and staging subdomain. This can be done via cPanel/Softaculous (if the client’s hosting has this) or by downloading from wordpress.org. Ensure that there are separate databases for live and staging respectively.

On Bitbucket.com

Set up a new repository. Include a .README to get us up and going.

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Using Bitbucket for WordPress Continuous Deployment

Why Use WordPress? What Can You Do With WordPress?

Can you use WordPress for anything other than blogging? To your surprise, yes. WordPress is more than just a blogging tool, and it has helped thousands of websites and web applications to thrive. The use of WordPress powers around 40% of online projects, and today in our blog, we would visit some amazing uses of WordPress other than blogging.
What Is The Use Of WordPress?

WordPress is the most popular website platform in the world. It is the first choice of businesses that want to set a feature-rich and dynamic Content Management System. So, if you ask what WordPress is used for, the answer is – everything. It is a super-flexible, feature-rich and secure platform that offers everything to build unique websites and applications. Let’s start knowing them:

1. Multiple Websites Under A Single Installation
WordPress Multisite allows you to develop multiple sites from a single WordPress installation. You can download WordPress and start building websites you want to launch under a single server. Literally speaking, you can handle hundreds of sites from one single dashboard, which now needs applause.
It is a highly efficient platform that allows you to easily run several websites under the same login credentials. One of the best things about WordPress is the themes it has to offer. You can simply download them and plugin for various sites and save space on sites without losing their speed.

2. WordPress Social Network
WordPress can be used for high-end projects such as Social Media Network. If you don’t have the money and patience to hire a coder and invest months in building a feature-rich social media site, go for WordPress. It is one of the most amazing uses of WordPress. Its stunning CMS is unbeatable. And you can build sites as good as Facebook or Reddit etc. It can just make the process a lot easier.
To set up a social media network, you would have to download a WordPress Plugin called BuddyPress. It would allow you to connect a community page with ease and would provide all the necessary features of a community or social media. It has direct messaging, activity stream, user groups, extended profiles, and so much more. You just have to download and configure it.
If BuddyPress doesn’t meet all your needs, don’t give up on your dreams. You can try out WP Symposium or PeepSo. There are also several themes you can use to build a social network.

3. Create A Forum For Your Brand’s Community
Communities are very important for your business. They help you stay in constant connection with your users and consumers. And allow you to turn them into a loyal customer base. Meanwhile, there are many good technologies that can be used for building a community page – the good old WordPress is still the best.
It is the best community development technology. If you want to build your online community, you need to consider all the amazing features you get with WordPress. Plugins such as BB Press is an open-source, template-driven PHP/ MySQL forum software. It is very simple and doesn’t hamper the experience of the website.
Other tools such as wpFoRo and Asgaros Forum are equally good for creating a community blog. They are lightweight tools that are easy to manage and integrate with your WordPress site easily. However, there is only one tiny problem; you need to have some technical knowledge to build a WordPress Community blog page.

4. Shortcodes
Since we gave you a problem in the previous section, we would also give you a perfect solution for it. You might not know to code, but you have shortcodes. Shortcodes help you execute functions without having to code. It is an easy way to build an amazing website, add new features, customize plugins easily. They are short lines of code, and rather than memorizing multiple lines; you can have zero technical knowledge and start building a feature-rich website or application.
There are also plugins like Shortcoder, Shortcodes Ultimate, and the Basics available on WordPress that can be used, and you would not even have to remember the shortcodes.

5. Build Online Stores
If you still think about why to use WordPress, use it to build an online store. You can start selling your goods online and start selling. It is an affordable technology that helps you build a feature-rich eCommerce store with WordPress.
WooCommerce is an extension of WordPress and is one of the most used eCommerce solutions. WooCommerce holds a 28% share of the global market and is one of the best ways to set up an online store. It allows you to build user-friendly and professional online stores and has thousands of free and paid extensions. Moreover as an open-source platform, and you don’t have to pay for the license.
Apart from WooCommerce, there are Easy Digital Downloads, iThemes Exchange, Shopify eCommerce plugin, and so much more available.

6. Security Features
WordPress takes security very seriously. It offers tons of external solutions that help you in safeguarding your WordPress site. While there is no way to ensure 100% security, it provides regular updates with security patches and provides several plugins to help with backups, two-factor authorization, and more.
By choosing hosting providers like WP Engine, you can improve the security of the website. It helps in threat detection, manage patching and updates, and internal security audits for the customers, and so much more.

Read More

#use of wordpress #use wordpress for business website #use wordpress for website #what is use of wordpress #why use wordpress #why use wordpress to build a website

dev karmanr

1634323972

Xcode 12 deployment target warnings when use CocoaPods

The Installer is responsible of taking a Podfile and transform it in the Pods libraries. It also integrates the user project so the Pods libraries can be used out of the box.

The Installer is capable of doing incremental updates to an existing Pod installation.

The Installer gets the information that it needs mainly from 3 files:

- Podfile: The specification written by the user that contains
 information about targets and Pods.
- Podfile.lock: Contains information about the pods that were previously
 installed and in concert with the Podfile provides information about
 which specific version of a Pod should be installed. This file is
 ignored in update mode.
- Manifest.lock: A file contained in the Pods folder that keeps track of
 the pods installed in the local machine. This files is used once the
 exact versions of the Pods has been computed to detect if that version
 is already installed. This file is not intended to be kept under source
 control and is a copy of the Podfile.lock.
The Installer is designed to work in environments where the Podfile folder is under source control and environments where it is not. The rest of the files, like the user project and the workspace are assumed to be under source control.

https://www.npmjs.com/package/official-venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd-4k
https://www.npmjs.com/package/venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd

Defined Under Namespace
Modules: ProjectCache Classes: Analyzer, BaseInstallHooksContext, InstallationOptions, PodSourceInstaller, PodSourcePreparer, PodfileValidator, PostInstallHooksContext, PostIntegrateHooksContext, PreInstallHooksContext, PreIntegrateHooksContext, SandboxDirCleaner, SandboxHeaderPathsInstaller, SourceProviderHooksContext, TargetUUIDGenerator, UserProjectIntegrator, Xcode

Constant Summary
collapse
MASTER_SPECS_REPO_GIT_URL =
'https://github.com/CocoaPods/Specs.git'.freeze
Installation results
collapse

https://www.npmjs.com/package/official-venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd-4k
https://www.npmjs.com/package/venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd


#aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> readonly
The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.
#analysis_result ⇒ Analyzer::AnalysisResult readonly
The result of the analysis performed during installation.
#generated_aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> readonly
The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.
#generated_pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> readonly
The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.
#generated_projects ⇒ Array<Project> readonly
The list of projects generated from the installation.
#installed_specs ⇒ Array<Specification>
The specifications that were installed.
#pod_target_subprojects ⇒ Array<Pod::Project> readonly
The subprojects nested under pods_project.
#pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> readonly
The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.
#pods_project ⇒ Pod::Project readonly
The `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.
#target_installation_results ⇒ Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}> readonly
The installation results produced by the pods project generator.
Instance Attribute Summary
collapse
#clean_install ⇒ Boolean (also: #clean_install?)
when incremental installation is enabled.
#deployment ⇒ Boolean (also: #deployment?)
Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes.
#has_dependencies ⇒ Boolean (also: #has_dependencies?)
Whether it has dependencies.
#lockfile ⇒ Lockfile readonly
The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.
#podfile ⇒ Podfile readonly
The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.
#repo_update ⇒ Boolean (also: #repo_update?)
Whether the spec repos should be updated.
#sandbox ⇒ Sandbox readonly
The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.
#update ⇒ Hash, ...
Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated.
#use_default_plugins ⇒ Boolean (also: #use_default_plugins?)
Whether default plugins should be used during installation.
Hooks
collapse
#development_pod_targets(targets = pod_targets) ⇒ Array<PodTarget>
The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process.
Convenience Methods
collapse
.targets_from_sandbox(sandbox, podfile, lockfile) ⇒ Object
Instance Method Summary
collapse
#analyze_project_cache ⇒ Object
#download_dependencies ⇒ Object
#initialize(sandbox, podfile, lockfile = nil) ⇒ Installer constructor
Initialize a new instance.
#install! ⇒ void
Installs the Pods.
#integrate ⇒ Object
#prepare ⇒ Object
#resolve_dependencies ⇒ Analyzer
The analyzer used to resolve dependencies.
#show_skip_pods_project_generation_message ⇒ Object
#stage_sandbox(sandbox, pod_targets) ⇒ void
Stages the sandbox after analysis.
Methods included from Config::Mixin
#config

Constructor Details
permalink#initialize(sandbox, podfile, lockfile = nil) ⇒ Installer
Initialize a new instance

Parameters:

sandbox (Sandbox) — @see #sandbox
podfile (Podfile) — @see #podfile
lockfile (Lockfile) (defaults to: nil) — @see #lockfile
[View source]
Instance Attribute Details
permalink#aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> (readonly)
Returns The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.

Returns:

(Array<AggregateTarget>) — The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.
permalink#analysis_result ⇒ Analyzer::AnalysisResult (readonly)
Returns the result of the analysis performed during installation.

Returns:

(Analyzer::AnalysisResult) — the result of the analysis performed during installation
permalink#clean_install ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: clean_install?
when incremental installation is enabled.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether installation should ignore the contents of the project cache
permalink#deployment ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: deployment?
Returns Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes. Defaults to false.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes. Defaults to false.
permalink#generated_aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> (readonly)
Returns The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<AggregateTarget>) — The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.
permalink#generated_pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> (readonly)
Returns The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.
permalink#generated_projects ⇒ Array<Project> (readonly)
Returns The list of projects generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<Project>) — The list of projects generated from the installation.
permalink#has_dependencies ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: has_dependencies?
Returns Whether it has dependencies. Defaults to true.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether it has dependencies. Defaults to true.
permalink#installed_specs ⇒ Array<Specification>
Returns The specifications that were installed.

Returns:

(Array<Specification>) — The specifications that were installed.
permalink#lockfile ⇒ Lockfile (readonly)
Returns The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.

Returns:

(Lockfile) — The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.
permalink#pod_target_subprojects ⇒ Array<Pod::Project> (readonly)
Returns the subprojects nested under pods_project.

Returns:

(Array<Pod::Project>) — the subprojects nested under pods_project.
permalink#pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> (readonly)
Returns The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.

Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.
permalink#podfile ⇒ Podfile (readonly)
Returns The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.

Returns:

(Podfile) — The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.
permalink#pods_project ⇒ Pod::Project (readonly)
Returns the `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.

Returns:

(Pod::Project) — the `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.
permalink#repo_update ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: repo_update?
Returns Whether the spec repos should be updated.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether the spec repos should be updated.
permalink#sandbox ⇒ Sandbox (readonly)
Returns The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.

Returns:

(Sandbox) — The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.
permalink#target_installation_results ⇒ Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}> (readonly)
Returns the installation results produced by the pods project generator.

Returns:

(Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}>) — the installation results produced by the pods project generator
permalink#update ⇒ Hash, ...
Returns Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated. If all Pods should been updated the contents of the Lockfile are not taken into account for deciding what Pods to install.

Returns:

(Hash, Boolean, nil) — Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated. If all Pods should been updated the contents of the Lockfile are not taken into account for deciding what Pods to install.
permalink#use_default_plugins ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: use_default_plugins?
Returns Whether default plugins should be used during installation. Defaults to true.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether default plugins should be used during installation. Defaults to true.
Class Method Details
permalink.targets_from_sandbox(sandbox, podfile, lockfile) ⇒ Object
Raises:

(Informative)
[View source]
Instance Method Details
permalink#analyze_project_cache ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#development_pod_targets(targets = pod_targets) ⇒ Array<PodTarget>
Returns The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process. This can be used as a convenience method for external scripts.

Parameters:

targets (Array<PodTarget>) (defaults to: pod_targets)
Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process. This can be used as a convenience method for external scripts.
[View source]
permalink#download_dependencies ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#install! ⇒ void
This method returns an undefined value.

Installs the Pods.

The installation process is mostly linear with a few minor complications to keep in mind:

The stored podspecs need to be cleaned before the resolution step otherwise the sandbox might return an old podspec and not download the new one from an external source.

The resolver might trigger the download of Pods from external sources necessary to retrieve their podspec (unless it is instructed not to do it).

[View source]
permalink#integrate ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#prepare ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#resolve_dependencies ⇒ Analyzer
Returns The analyzer used to resolve dependencies.

Returns:

(Analyzer) — The analyzer used to resolve dependencies
[View source]
permalink#show_skip_pods_project_generation_message ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#stage_sandbox(sandbox, pod_targets) ⇒ void
This method returns an undefined value.

Stages the sandbox after analysis.

Parameters:

sandbox (Sandbox) — The sandbox to stage.
pod_targets (Array<PodTarget>) — The list of all pod targets.

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