Reuben  Deckow

Reuben Deckow

1629838020

Explore Docker Container’s File System

When it comes to exploring a Docker container’s file system, it can be in two ways - interactive and non-interactive. In short, interactive exploration of a Docker container’s file system can be done by accessing the file system through the bash of the container. While on the other hand, non-interactive exploration relates to studying the filesystem without entering the container environment either through tar files or copying the filesystem of the container.

Let’s try to discuss both these ways in this article.

#docker 

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Explore Docker Container’s File System
Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1602317778

Ever Wondered Why We Use Containers In DevOps?

At some point we’ve all said the words, “But it works on my machine.” It usually happens during testing or when you’re trying to get a new project set up. Sometimes it happens when you pull down changes from an updated branch.

Every machine has different underlying states depending on the operating system, other installed programs, and permissions. Getting a project to run locally could take hours or even days because of weird system issues.

The worst part is that this can also happen in production. If the server is configured differently than what you’re running locally, your changes might not work as you expect and cause problems for users. There’s a way around all of these common issues using containers.

What is a container

A container is a piece of software that packages code and its dependencies so that the application can run in any computing environment. They basically create a little unit that you can put on any operating system and reliably and consistently run the application. You don’t have to worry about any of those underlying system issues creeping in later.

Although containers were already used in Linux for years, they became more popular in recent years. Most of the time when people are talking about containers, they’re referring to Docker containers. These containers are built from images that include all of the dependencies needed to run an application.

When you think of containers, virtual machines might also come to mind. They are very similar, but the big difference is that containers virtualize the operating system instead of the hardware. That’s what makes them so easy to run on all of the operating systems consistently.

What containers have to do with DevOps

Since we know how odd happenings occur when you move code from one computing environment to another, this is also a common issue with moving code to the different environments in our DevOps process. You don’t want to have to deal with system differences between staging and production. That would require more work than it should.

Once you have an artifact built, you should be able to use it in any environment from local to production. That’s the reason we use containers in DevOps. It’s also invaluable when you’re working with microservices. Docker containers used with something like Kubernetes will make it easier for you to handle larger systems with more moving pieces.

#devops #containers #containers-devops #devops-containers #devops-tools #devops-docker #docker #docker-image

Haylie  Conn

Haylie Conn

1623747973

Implementing Non-Trivial Containerized Systems: Picking Components

We’ll use Icecast, Liquidsoap, youtube-dl, and FFmpeg as the base components for creating our radio station.

So, you want to start a radio station, eh?

This is the first part of a multi-part series on designing and building non-trivial containerized solutions. We’re making a radio station using off-the-shelf components and some home-spun software, all on top of Docker, Docker Compose, and eventually, Kubernetes.
In this part, we’re going to explore how the different parts of the system interface with one another, to set the stage for our next post, where we Dockerize everything!

I first met Icecast (https://icecast.org/) when I worked at a web-hosting startup around the turn of the millennium. One night, one of my co-workers and I had the crazy idea to load a bunch of audio files on the networked file server and stream them to our workstations. We could listen to music while we worked 90+ hours a week. Strange times. After realizing it wasn’t as simple as exporting .ogg files over HTTP, we found Icecast (and its pal, Ices2) and built a rudimentary, local-network broadcast radio station.

#open source #cloud #tutorial #docker #containers #docker containers #docker container

Iliana  Welch

Iliana Welch

1597368540

Docker Tutorial for Beginners 8 - Build and Run C++ Applications in a Docker Container

Docker is an open platform that allows use package, develop, run, and ship software applications in different environments using containers.
In this course We will learn How to Write Dockerfiles, Working with the Docker Toolbox, How to Work with the Docker Machine, How to Use Docker Compose to fire up multiple containers, How to Work with Docker Kinematic, Push images to Docker Hub, Pull images from a Docker Registery, Push stacks of servers to Docker Hub.
How to install Docker on Mac.

#docker tutorial #c++ #docker container #docker #docker hub #devopstools

Iliana  Welch

Iliana Welch

1595249460

Docker Explained: Docker Architecture | Docker Registries

Following the second video about Docker basics, in this video, I explain Docker architecture and explain the different building blocks of the docker engine; docker client, API, Docker Daemon. I also explain what a docker registry is and I finish the video with a demo explaining and illustrating how to use Docker hub

In this video lesson you will learn:

  • What is Docker Host
  • What is Docker Engine
  • Learn about Docker Architecture
  • Learn about Docker client and Docker Daemon
  • Docker Hub and Registries
  • Simple demo to understand using images from registries

#docker #docker hub #docker host #docker engine #docker architecture #api

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1620633584

System Databases in SQL Server

Introduction

In SSMS, we many of may noticed System Databases under the Database Folder. But how many of us knows its purpose?. In this article lets discuss about the System Databases in SQL Server.

System Database

Fig. 1 System Databases

There are five system databases, these databases are created while installing SQL Server.

  • Master
  • Model
  • MSDB
  • Tempdb
  • Resource
Master
  • This database contains all the System level Information in SQL Server. The Information in form of Meta data.
  • Because of this master database, we are able to access the SQL Server (On premise SQL Server)
Model
  • This database is used as a template for new databases.
  • Whenever a new database is created, initially a copy of model database is what created as new database.
MSDB
  • This database is where a service called SQL Server Agent stores its data.
  • SQL server Agent is in charge of automation, which includes entities such as jobs, schedules, and alerts.
TempDB
  • The Tempdb is where SQL Server stores temporary data such as work tables, sort space, row versioning information and etc.
  • User can create their own version of temporary tables and those are stored in Tempdb.
  • But this database is destroyed and recreated every time when we restart the instance of SQL Server.
Resource
  • The resource database is a hidden, read only database that holds the definitions of all system objects.
  • When we query system object in a database, they appear to reside in the sys schema of the local database, but in actually their definitions reside in the resource db.

#sql server #master system database #model system database #msdb system database #sql server system databases #ssms #system database #system databases in sql server #tempdb system database