ERIC  MACUS

ERIC MACUS

1647540000

Substrate Knowledge Map For Hackathon Participants

Substrate Knowledge Map for Hackathon Participants

The Substrate Knowledge Map provides information that you—as a Substrate hackathon participant—need to know to develop a non-trivial application for your hackathon submission.

The map covers 6 main sections:

  1. Introduction
  2. Basics
  3. Preliminaries
  4. Runtime Development
  5. Polkadot JS API
  6. Smart Contracts

Each section contains basic information on each topic, with links to additional documentation for you to dig deeper. Within each section, you'll find a mix of quizzes and labs to test your knowledge as your progress through the map. The goal of the labs and quizzes is to help you consolidate what you've learned and put it to practice with some hands-on activities.

Introduction

One question we often get is why learn the Substrate framework when we can write smart contracts to build decentralized applications?

The short answer is that using the Substrate framework and writing smart contracts are two different approaches.

Smart contract development

Traditional smart contract platforms allow users to publish additional logic on top of some core blockchain logic. Since smart contract logic can be published by anyone, including malicious actors and inexperienced developers, there are a number of intentional safeguards and restrictions built around these public smart contract platforms. For example:

Fees: Smart contract developers must ensure that contract users are charged for the computation and storage they impose on the computers running their contract. With fees, block creators are protected from abuse of the network.

Sandboxed: A contract is not able to modify core blockchain storage or storage items of other contracts directly. Its power is limited to only modifying its own state, and the ability to make outside calls to other contracts or runtime functions.

Reversion: Contracts can be prone to undesirable situations that lead to logical errors when wanting to revert or upgrade them. Developers need to learn additional patterns such as splitting their contract's logic and data to ensure seamless upgrades.

These safeguards and restrictions make running smart contracts slower and more costly. However, it's important to consider the different developer audiences for contract development versus Substrate runtime development.

Building decentralized applications with smart contracts allows your community to extend and develop on top of your runtime logic without worrying about proposals, runtime upgrades, and so on. You can also use smart contracts as a testing ground for future runtime changes, but done in an isolated way that protects your network from any errors the changes might introduce.

In summary, smart contract development:

  • Is inherently safer to the network.
  • Provides economic incentives and transaction fee mechanisms that can't be directly controlled by the smart contract author.
  • Provides computational overhead to support graceful logical failures.
  • Has a low barrier to entry for developers and enables a faster pace of community interaction.

Substrate runtime development

Unlike traditional smart contract development, Substrate runtime development offers none of the network protections or safeguards. Instead, as a runtime developer, you have total control over how the blockchain behaves. However, this level of control also means that there is a higher barrier to entry.

Substrate is a framework for building blockchains, which almost makes comparing it to smart contract development like comparing apples and oranges. With the Substrate framework, developers can build smart contracts but that is only a fraction of using Substrate to its full potential.

With Substrate, you have full control over the underlying logic that your network's nodes will run. You also have full access for modifying and controlling each and every storage item across your runtime modules. As you progress through this map, you'll discover concepts and techniques that will help you to unlock the potential of the Substrate framework, giving you the freedom to build the blockchain that best suits the needs of your application.

You'll also discover how you can upgrade the Substrate runtime with a single transaction instead of having to organize a community hard-fork. Upgradeability is one of the primary design features of the Substrate framework.

In summary, runtime development:

  • Provides low level access to your entire blockchain.
  • Removes the overhead of built-in safety for performance.
  • Has a higher barrier of entry for developers.
  • Provides flexibility to customize full-stack application logic.

To learn more about using smart contracts within Substrate, refer to the Smart Contract - Overview page as well as the Polkadot Builders Guide.

Navigating the documentation

If you need any community support, please join the following channels based on the area where you need help:

Alternatively, also look for support on Stackoverflow where questions are tagged with "substrate" or on the Parity Subport repo.

Use the following links to explore the sites and resources available on each:

Substrate Developer Hub has the most comprehensive all-round coverage about Substrate, from a "big picture" explanation of architecture to specific technical concepts. The site also provides tutorials to guide you as your learn the Substrate framework and the API reference documentation. You should check this site first if you want to look up information about Substrate runtime development. The site consists of:

Knowledge Base: Explaining the foundational concepts of building blockchain runtimes using Substrate.

Tutorials: Hand-on tutorials for developers to follow. The first SIX tutorials show the fundamentals in Substrate and are recommended for every Substrate learner to go through.

How-to Guides: These resources are like the O'Reilly cookbook series written in a task-oriented way for readers to get the job done. Some examples of the topics overed include:

  • Setting up proper weight functions for extrinsic calls.
  • Using off-chain workers to fetch HTTP requests.
  • Writing tests for your pallets It can also be read from

API docs: Substrate API reference documentation.

Substrate Node Template provides a light weight, minimal Substrate blockchain node that you can set up as a local development environment.

Substrate Front-end template provides a front-end interface built with React using Polkadot-JS API to connect to any Substrate node. Developers are encouraged to start new Substrate projects based on these templates.

If you face any technical difficulties and need support, feel free to join the Substrate Technical matrix channel and ask your questions there.

Additional resources

Polkadot Wiki documents the specific behavior and mechanisms of the Polkadot network. The Polkadot network allows multiple blockchains to connect and pass messages to each other. On the wiki, you can learn about how Polkadot—built using Substrate—is customized to support inter-blockchain message passing.

Polkadot JS API doc: documents how to use the Polkadot-JS API. This JavaScript-based API allows developers to build custom front-ends for their blockchains and applications. Polkadot JS API provides a way to connect to Substrate-based blockchains to query runtime metadata and send transactions.

Quiz #1

👉 Submit your answers to Quiz #1

Basics

Set up your local development environment

Here you will set up your local machine to install the Rust compiler—ensuring that you have both stable and nightly versions installed. Both stable and nightly versions are required because currently a Substrate runtime is compiled to a native binary using the stable Rust compiler, then compiled to a WebAssembly (WASM) binary, which only the nightly Rust compiler can do.

Also refer to:

Lab #1

👉 Complete Lab #1: Run a Substrate node

Interact with a Substrate network using Polkadot-JS apps

Polkadot JS Apps is the canonical front-end to interact with any Substrate-based chain.

You can configure whichever endpoint you want it to connected to, even to your localhost running node. Refer to the following two diagrams.

  1. Click on the top left side showing your currently connected network:

assets/01-polkadot-app-endpoint.png

  1. Scroll to the bottom of the menu, open DEVELOPMENT, and choose either Local Node or Custom to specify your own endpoint.

assets/02-polkadot-app-select-endpoint.png

Quiz #2

👉 Complete Quiz #2

Lab #2

👉 Complete Lab #2: Using Polkadot-JS Apps

Notes: If you are connecting Apps to a custom chain (or your locally-running node), you may need to specify your chain's custom data types in JSON under Settings > Developer.

Polkadot-JS Apps only receives a series of bytes from the blockchain. It is up to the developer to tell it how to decode and interpret these custom data type. To learn more on this, refer to:

You will also need to create an account. To do so, follow these steps on account generation. You'll learn that you can also use the Polkadot-JS Browser Plugin (a Metamask-like browser extension to manage your Substrate accounts) and it will automatically be imported into Polkadot-JS Apps.

Notes: When you run a Substrate chain in development mode (with the --dev flag), well-known accounts (Alice, Bob, Charlie, etc.) are always created for you.

Lab #3

👉 Complete Lab #3: Create an Account

Preliminaries

You need to know some Rust programming concepts and have a good understanding on how blockchain technology works in order to make the most of developing with Substrate. The following resources will help you brush up in these areas.

Rust

You will need familiarize yourself with Rust to understand how Substrate is built and how to make the most of its capabilities.

If you are new to Rust, or need a brush up on your Rust knowledge, please refer to The Rust Book. You could still continue learning about Substrate without knowing Rust, but we recommend you come back to this section whenever in doubt about what any of the Rust syntax you're looking at means. Here are the parts of the Rust book we recommend you familiarize yourself with:

  • ch 1 - 10: These chapters cover the foundational knowledge of programming in Rust
  • ch 13: On iterators and closures
  • ch 18 - 19: On advanced traits and advanced types. Learn a bit about macros as well. You will not necessarily be writing your own macros, but you'll be using a lot of Substrate and FRAME's built-in macros to write your blockchain runtime.

How blockchains work

Given that you'll be writing a blockchain runtime, you need to know what a blockchain is, and how it works. The **Web3 Blockchain Fundamental MOOC Youtube video series provides a good basis for understanding key blockchain concepts and how blockchains work.

The lectures we recommend you watch are: lectures 1 - 7 and lecture 10. That's 8 lectures, or about 4 hours of video.

Quiz #3

👉 Complete Quiz #3

Substrate runtime development

High level architecture

To know more about the high level architecture of Substrate, please go through the Knowledge Base articles on Getting Started: Overview and Getting Started: Architecture.

In this document, we assume you will develop a Substrate runtime with FRAME (v2). This is what a Substrate node consists of.

assets/03-substrate-architecture.png

Each node has many components that manage things like the transaction queue, communicating over a P2P network, reaching consensus on the state of the blockchain, and the chain's actual runtime logic (aka the blockchain runtime). Each aspect of the node is interesting in its own right, and the runtime is particularly interesting because it contains the business logic (aka "state transition function") that codifies the chain's functionality. The runtime contains a collection of pallets that are configured to work together.

On the node level, Substrate leverages libp2p for the p2p networking layer and puts the transaction pool, consensus mechanism, and underlying data storage (a key-value database) on the node level. These components all work "under the hood", and in this knowledge map we won't cover them in detail except for mentioning their existence.

Quiz #4

👉 Complete Quiz #4

Runtime development topics

In our Developer Hub, we have a thorough coverage on various subjects you need to know to develop with Substrate. So here we just list out the key topics and reference back to Developer Hub. Please go through the following key concepts and the directed resources to know the fundamentals of runtime development.

Key Concept: Runtime, this is where the blockchain state transition function (the blockchain application-specific logic) is defined. It is about composing multiple pallets (can be understood as Rust modules) together in the runtime and hooking them up together.

Runtime Development: Execution, this article describes how a block is produced, and how transactions are selected and executed to reach the next "stage" in the blockchain.

Runtime Develpment: Pallets, this article describes what the basic structure of a Substrate pallet is consists of.

Runtime Development: FRAME, this article gives a high level overview of the system pallets Substrate already implements to help you quickly develop as a runtime engineer. Have a quick skim so you have a basic idea of the different pallets Substrate is made of.

Lab #4

👉 Complete Lab #4: Adding a Pallet into a Runtime

Runtime Development: Storage, this article describes how data is stored on-chain and how you could access them.

Runtime Development: Events & Errors, this page describe how external parties know what has happened in the blockchain, via the emitted events and errors when executing transactions.

Notes: All of the above concepts we leverage on the #[pallet::*] macro to define them in the code. If you are interested to learn more about what other types of pallet macros exist go to the FRAME macro API documentation and this doc on some frequently used Substrate macros.

Lab #5

👉 Complete Lab #5: Building a Proof-of-Existence dApp

Lab #6

👉 Complete Lab #6: Building a Substrate Kitties dApp

Quiz #5

👉 Complete Quiz #5

Polkadot JS API

Polkadot JS API is the javascript API for Substrate. By using it you can build a javascript front end or utility and interact with any Substrate-based blockchain.

The Substrate Front-end Template is an example of using Polkadot JS API in a React front-end.

  • Runtime Development: Metadata, this article describes the API allowing external parties to query what API is open for the chain. Polkadot JS API makes use of a chain's metadata to know what queries and functions are available from a chain to call.

Lab #7

👉 Complete Lab #7: Using Polkadot-JS API

Quiz #6

👉 Complete Quiz #6: Using Polkadot-JS API

Smart contracts

Learn about the difference between smart contract development vs Substrate runtime development, and when to use each here.

In Substrate, you can program smart contracts using ink!.

Quiz #7

👉 Complete Quiz #7: Using ink!

What we do not cover

A lot 😄

On-chain runtime upgrades. We have a tutorial on On-chain (forkless) Runtime Upgrade. This tutorial introduces how to perform and schedule a runtime upgrade as an on-chain transaction.

About transaction weight and fee, and benchmarking your runtime to determine the proper transaction cost.

Off-chain Features

There are certain limits to on-chain logic. For instance, computation cannot be too intensive that it affects the block output time, and computation must be deterministic. This means that computation that relies on external data fetching cannot be done on-chain. In Substrate, developers can run these types of computation off-chain and have the result sent back on-chain via extrinsics.

Tightly- and Loosely-coupled pallets, calling one pallet's functions from another pallet via trait specification.

Blockchain Consensus Mechansim, and a guide on customizing it to proof-of-work here.

Parachains: one key feature of Substrate is the capability of becoming a parachain for relay chains like Polkadot. You can develop your own application-specific logic in your chain and rely on the validator community of the relay chain to secure your network, instead of building another validator community yourself. Learn more with the following resources:

Terms clarification

  • Substrate: the blockchain development framework built for writing highly customized, domain-specific blockchains.
  • Polkadot: Polkadot is the relay chain blockchain, built with Substrate.
  • Kusama: Kusama is Polkadot's canary network, used to launch features before these features are launched on Polkadot. You could view it as a beta-network with real economic value where the state of the blockchain is never reset.
  • Web 3.0: is the decentralized internet ecosystem that, instead of apps being centrally stored in a few servers and managed by a sovereign party, it is an open, trustless, and permissionless network when apps are not controlled by a centralized entity.
  • Web3 Foundation: A foundation setup to support the development of decentralized web software protocols. Learn more about what they do on thier website.

Others


Author: substrate-developer-hub
Source Code: https://github.com/substrate-developer-hub/hackathon-knowledge-map
License: 

#blockchain #substrate 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Substrate Knowledge Map For Hackathon Participants
Trevor  Russel

Trevor Russel

1618115820

New Hackathon For Data Scientists — Workation Price Prediction Challenge

MachineHack, in association with Analytics India Magazine, has come up with yet another hackathon for the machine learning community — the Workation Price Prediction Challenge.

In the light of the new normal, different websites have started providing packages to work from different locations. The concept of workation — a portmanteau of work and vacation– is gaining currency. However, it is challenging to find a good place with all the amenities, including high-speed internet and a comfortable stay within the budget.

Thus, to solve the real-world problem of finding the best deals for workations, MachineHack is challenging the machine learning community to build a model for predicting the price per person for workation trips.

To facilitate this, MachineHack has collected workation packages in and around India — starting from Kashmir to Kanyakumari and from Gujarat to Assam. The data has more than 18000+ rows of different packages with details like start location, hotel type, cost per person, destination, itinerary, and many more. Using this dataset, along with the knowledge of machine learning, deep learning, and model building, the participants need to create a model that can efficiently and accurately predict a workation trip’s expense.

#data science hackathon #hackathon #hackathon for data scientists #machine learning hackathon #ml hackathon #predicting workation price #workation price prediction challenge

ERIC  MACUS

ERIC MACUS

1647540000

Substrate Knowledge Map For Hackathon Participants

Substrate Knowledge Map for Hackathon Participants

The Substrate Knowledge Map provides information that you—as a Substrate hackathon participant—need to know to develop a non-trivial application for your hackathon submission.

The map covers 6 main sections:

  1. Introduction
  2. Basics
  3. Preliminaries
  4. Runtime Development
  5. Polkadot JS API
  6. Smart Contracts

Each section contains basic information on each topic, with links to additional documentation for you to dig deeper. Within each section, you'll find a mix of quizzes and labs to test your knowledge as your progress through the map. The goal of the labs and quizzes is to help you consolidate what you've learned and put it to practice with some hands-on activities.

Introduction

One question we often get is why learn the Substrate framework when we can write smart contracts to build decentralized applications?

The short answer is that using the Substrate framework and writing smart contracts are two different approaches.

Smart contract development

Traditional smart contract platforms allow users to publish additional logic on top of some core blockchain logic. Since smart contract logic can be published by anyone, including malicious actors and inexperienced developers, there are a number of intentional safeguards and restrictions built around these public smart contract platforms. For example:

Fees: Smart contract developers must ensure that contract users are charged for the computation and storage they impose on the computers running their contract. With fees, block creators are protected from abuse of the network.

Sandboxed: A contract is not able to modify core blockchain storage or storage items of other contracts directly. Its power is limited to only modifying its own state, and the ability to make outside calls to other contracts or runtime functions.

Reversion: Contracts can be prone to undesirable situations that lead to logical errors when wanting to revert or upgrade them. Developers need to learn additional patterns such as splitting their contract's logic and data to ensure seamless upgrades.

These safeguards and restrictions make running smart contracts slower and more costly. However, it's important to consider the different developer audiences for contract development versus Substrate runtime development.

Building decentralized applications with smart contracts allows your community to extend and develop on top of your runtime logic without worrying about proposals, runtime upgrades, and so on. You can also use smart contracts as a testing ground for future runtime changes, but done in an isolated way that protects your network from any errors the changes might introduce.

In summary, smart contract development:

  • Is inherently safer to the network.
  • Provides economic incentives and transaction fee mechanisms that can't be directly controlled by the smart contract author.
  • Provides computational overhead to support graceful logical failures.
  • Has a low barrier to entry for developers and enables a faster pace of community interaction.

Substrate runtime development

Unlike traditional smart contract development, Substrate runtime development offers none of the network protections or safeguards. Instead, as a runtime developer, you have total control over how the blockchain behaves. However, this level of control also means that there is a higher barrier to entry.

Substrate is a framework for building blockchains, which almost makes comparing it to smart contract development like comparing apples and oranges. With the Substrate framework, developers can build smart contracts but that is only a fraction of using Substrate to its full potential.

With Substrate, you have full control over the underlying logic that your network's nodes will run. You also have full access for modifying and controlling each and every storage item across your runtime modules. As you progress through this map, you'll discover concepts and techniques that will help you to unlock the potential of the Substrate framework, giving you the freedom to build the blockchain that best suits the needs of your application.

You'll also discover how you can upgrade the Substrate runtime with a single transaction instead of having to organize a community hard-fork. Upgradeability is one of the primary design features of the Substrate framework.

In summary, runtime development:

  • Provides low level access to your entire blockchain.
  • Removes the overhead of built-in safety for performance.
  • Has a higher barrier of entry for developers.
  • Provides flexibility to customize full-stack application logic.

To learn more about using smart contracts within Substrate, refer to the Smart Contract - Overview page as well as the Polkadot Builders Guide.

Navigating the documentation

If you need any community support, please join the following channels based on the area where you need help:

Alternatively, also look for support on Stackoverflow where questions are tagged with "substrate" or on the Parity Subport repo.

Use the following links to explore the sites and resources available on each:

Substrate Developer Hub has the most comprehensive all-round coverage about Substrate, from a "big picture" explanation of architecture to specific technical concepts. The site also provides tutorials to guide you as your learn the Substrate framework and the API reference documentation. You should check this site first if you want to look up information about Substrate runtime development. The site consists of:

Knowledge Base: Explaining the foundational concepts of building blockchain runtimes using Substrate.

Tutorials: Hand-on tutorials for developers to follow. The first SIX tutorials show the fundamentals in Substrate and are recommended for every Substrate learner to go through.

How-to Guides: These resources are like the O'Reilly cookbook series written in a task-oriented way for readers to get the job done. Some examples of the topics overed include:

  • Setting up proper weight functions for extrinsic calls.
  • Using off-chain workers to fetch HTTP requests.
  • Writing tests for your pallets It can also be read from

API docs: Substrate API reference documentation.

Substrate Node Template provides a light weight, minimal Substrate blockchain node that you can set up as a local development environment.

Substrate Front-end template provides a front-end interface built with React using Polkadot-JS API to connect to any Substrate node. Developers are encouraged to start new Substrate projects based on these templates.

If you face any technical difficulties and need support, feel free to join the Substrate Technical matrix channel and ask your questions there.

Additional resources

Polkadot Wiki documents the specific behavior and mechanisms of the Polkadot network. The Polkadot network allows multiple blockchains to connect and pass messages to each other. On the wiki, you can learn about how Polkadot—built using Substrate—is customized to support inter-blockchain message passing.

Polkadot JS API doc: documents how to use the Polkadot-JS API. This JavaScript-based API allows developers to build custom front-ends for their blockchains and applications. Polkadot JS API provides a way to connect to Substrate-based blockchains to query runtime metadata and send transactions.

Quiz #1

👉 Submit your answers to Quiz #1

Basics

Set up your local development environment

Here you will set up your local machine to install the Rust compiler—ensuring that you have both stable and nightly versions installed. Both stable and nightly versions are required because currently a Substrate runtime is compiled to a native binary using the stable Rust compiler, then compiled to a WebAssembly (WASM) binary, which only the nightly Rust compiler can do.

Also refer to:

Lab #1

👉 Complete Lab #1: Run a Substrate node

Interact with a Substrate network using Polkadot-JS apps

Polkadot JS Apps is the canonical front-end to interact with any Substrate-based chain.

You can configure whichever endpoint you want it to connected to, even to your localhost running node. Refer to the following two diagrams.

  1. Click on the top left side showing your currently connected network:

assets/01-polkadot-app-endpoint.png

  1. Scroll to the bottom of the menu, open DEVELOPMENT, and choose either Local Node or Custom to specify your own endpoint.

assets/02-polkadot-app-select-endpoint.png

Quiz #2

👉 Complete Quiz #2

Lab #2

👉 Complete Lab #2: Using Polkadot-JS Apps

Notes: If you are connecting Apps to a custom chain (or your locally-running node), you may need to specify your chain's custom data types in JSON under Settings > Developer.

Polkadot-JS Apps only receives a series of bytes from the blockchain. It is up to the developer to tell it how to decode and interpret these custom data type. To learn more on this, refer to:

You will also need to create an account. To do so, follow these steps on account generation. You'll learn that you can also use the Polkadot-JS Browser Plugin (a Metamask-like browser extension to manage your Substrate accounts) and it will automatically be imported into Polkadot-JS Apps.

Notes: When you run a Substrate chain in development mode (with the --dev flag), well-known accounts (Alice, Bob, Charlie, etc.) are always created for you.

Lab #3

👉 Complete Lab #3: Create an Account

Preliminaries

You need to know some Rust programming concepts and have a good understanding on how blockchain technology works in order to make the most of developing with Substrate. The following resources will help you brush up in these areas.

Rust

You will need familiarize yourself with Rust to understand how Substrate is built and how to make the most of its capabilities.

If you are new to Rust, or need a brush up on your Rust knowledge, please refer to The Rust Book. You could still continue learning about Substrate without knowing Rust, but we recommend you come back to this section whenever in doubt about what any of the Rust syntax you're looking at means. Here are the parts of the Rust book we recommend you familiarize yourself with:

  • ch 1 - 10: These chapters cover the foundational knowledge of programming in Rust
  • ch 13: On iterators and closures
  • ch 18 - 19: On advanced traits and advanced types. Learn a bit about macros as well. You will not necessarily be writing your own macros, but you'll be using a lot of Substrate and FRAME's built-in macros to write your blockchain runtime.

How blockchains work

Given that you'll be writing a blockchain runtime, you need to know what a blockchain is, and how it works. The **Web3 Blockchain Fundamental MOOC Youtube video series provides a good basis for understanding key blockchain concepts and how blockchains work.

The lectures we recommend you watch are: lectures 1 - 7 and lecture 10. That's 8 lectures, or about 4 hours of video.

Quiz #3

👉 Complete Quiz #3

Substrate runtime development

High level architecture

To know more about the high level architecture of Substrate, please go through the Knowledge Base articles on Getting Started: Overview and Getting Started: Architecture.

In this document, we assume you will develop a Substrate runtime with FRAME (v2). This is what a Substrate node consists of.

assets/03-substrate-architecture.png

Each node has many components that manage things like the transaction queue, communicating over a P2P network, reaching consensus on the state of the blockchain, and the chain's actual runtime logic (aka the blockchain runtime). Each aspect of the node is interesting in its own right, and the runtime is particularly interesting because it contains the business logic (aka "state transition function") that codifies the chain's functionality. The runtime contains a collection of pallets that are configured to work together.

On the node level, Substrate leverages libp2p for the p2p networking layer and puts the transaction pool, consensus mechanism, and underlying data storage (a key-value database) on the node level. These components all work "under the hood", and in this knowledge map we won't cover them in detail except for mentioning their existence.

Quiz #4

👉 Complete Quiz #4

Runtime development topics

In our Developer Hub, we have a thorough coverage on various subjects you need to know to develop with Substrate. So here we just list out the key topics and reference back to Developer Hub. Please go through the following key concepts and the directed resources to know the fundamentals of runtime development.

Key Concept: Runtime, this is where the blockchain state transition function (the blockchain application-specific logic) is defined. It is about composing multiple pallets (can be understood as Rust modules) together in the runtime and hooking them up together.

Runtime Development: Execution, this article describes how a block is produced, and how transactions are selected and executed to reach the next "stage" in the blockchain.

Runtime Develpment: Pallets, this article describes what the basic structure of a Substrate pallet is consists of.

Runtime Development: FRAME, this article gives a high level overview of the system pallets Substrate already implements to help you quickly develop as a runtime engineer. Have a quick skim so you have a basic idea of the different pallets Substrate is made of.

Lab #4

👉 Complete Lab #4: Adding a Pallet into a Runtime

Runtime Development: Storage, this article describes how data is stored on-chain and how you could access them.

Runtime Development: Events & Errors, this page describe how external parties know what has happened in the blockchain, via the emitted events and errors when executing transactions.

Notes: All of the above concepts we leverage on the #[pallet::*] macro to define them in the code. If you are interested to learn more about what other types of pallet macros exist go to the FRAME macro API documentation and this doc on some frequently used Substrate macros.

Lab #5

👉 Complete Lab #5: Building a Proof-of-Existence dApp

Lab #6

👉 Complete Lab #6: Building a Substrate Kitties dApp

Quiz #5

👉 Complete Quiz #5

Polkadot JS API

Polkadot JS API is the javascript API for Substrate. By using it you can build a javascript front end or utility and interact with any Substrate-based blockchain.

The Substrate Front-end Template is an example of using Polkadot JS API in a React front-end.

  • Runtime Development: Metadata, this article describes the API allowing external parties to query what API is open for the chain. Polkadot JS API makes use of a chain's metadata to know what queries and functions are available from a chain to call.

Lab #7

👉 Complete Lab #7: Using Polkadot-JS API

Quiz #6

👉 Complete Quiz #6: Using Polkadot-JS API

Smart contracts

Learn about the difference between smart contract development vs Substrate runtime development, and when to use each here.

In Substrate, you can program smart contracts using ink!.

Quiz #7

👉 Complete Quiz #7: Using ink!

What we do not cover

A lot 😄

On-chain runtime upgrades. We have a tutorial on On-chain (forkless) Runtime Upgrade. This tutorial introduces how to perform and schedule a runtime upgrade as an on-chain transaction.

About transaction weight and fee, and benchmarking your runtime to determine the proper transaction cost.

Off-chain Features

There are certain limits to on-chain logic. For instance, computation cannot be too intensive that it affects the block output time, and computation must be deterministic. This means that computation that relies on external data fetching cannot be done on-chain. In Substrate, developers can run these types of computation off-chain and have the result sent back on-chain via extrinsics.

Tightly- and Loosely-coupled pallets, calling one pallet's functions from another pallet via trait specification.

Blockchain Consensus Mechansim, and a guide on customizing it to proof-of-work here.

Parachains: one key feature of Substrate is the capability of becoming a parachain for relay chains like Polkadot. You can develop your own application-specific logic in your chain and rely on the validator community of the relay chain to secure your network, instead of building another validator community yourself. Learn more with the following resources:

Terms clarification

  • Substrate: the blockchain development framework built for writing highly customized, domain-specific blockchains.
  • Polkadot: Polkadot is the relay chain blockchain, built with Substrate.
  • Kusama: Kusama is Polkadot's canary network, used to launch features before these features are launched on Polkadot. You could view it as a beta-network with real economic value where the state of the blockchain is never reset.
  • Web 3.0: is the decentralized internet ecosystem that, instead of apps being centrally stored in a few servers and managed by a sovereign party, it is an open, trustless, and permissionless network when apps are not controlled by a centralized entity.
  • Web3 Foundation: A foundation setup to support the development of decentralized web software protocols. Learn more about what they do on thier website.

Others


Author: substrate-developer-hub
Source Code: https://github.com/substrate-developer-hub/hackathon-knowledge-map
License: 

#blockchain #substrate 

Edna  Bernhard

Edna Bernhard

1596855420

Melanoma Tumor Size Prediction: Weekend Hackathon

MachineHack welcomes all Data Science and Machine Learning enthusiasts to another exciting weekend hackathon. This weekend, participants must use their data science skills to predict the melanoma tumor size based on a number of factors.

#featured #datascience hackathons #hackathon #machine learning hackathon #machine learning hackathons

sarika Inogic

1623221809

Maplytics - Dynamics 365 CRM and Bing Maps Integration

Maplytics™ is an advanced mapping and data visualization tool for Microsoft Dynamics 365 CRM. It provides Territory Management, Appointment Planning, Routing, Radius Search and much more with support for PowerApps (CDS). Maplytics supports all Dynamics 365 deployment models for Dynamics CRM 2011 and above as well as native Dynamics 365 App for Phones and Tablets.
Below are the features you can avail with Maplytics
• Sales Territory Management: Geographically manage and align sales territories, perform binary operations on shapes, regions or territories on map. Assign multiple territories to a record.
• Auto Scheduling: Create an automated optimized schedule for multiple days on field including routes to follow each day based on details entered by user and also create activities for the same
• Check-In/Check-Out: Enable Check-In/Check-Out for field reps on site of visit with the option of Geofencing
• PCF control: User can add components on fields or grids within Dynamics CRM to view the respective records on the map within the record form or the entity grid
• Overlay: View records, shape files and existing territories together on map. View Census Data as existing Overlay feature.
• Proximity Search: Search records for a location based on radius or time with shortest travel and line of sight distance.
• Route Optimization: Optimize routes, find nearby records along the route and points of interest like Coffee Shops, Gas station, etc.
• Customizable Pushpins & Tooltip Cards: Plot desired icons for pushpins for seamless visual analysis. Call to action buttons on Tooltip cards for quick actions.
• Security template: System admin and Maplytics admin can provide selective access of actions to users
• Marketing Management: Create geographically targeted Marketing Lists for personalized and relevant promotions, marketing campaigns and events
• Mass Actions: Add to Route, Save Data, Schedule Appointments, Send Emails and more for records plotted on map
• Summary Card: Get aggregated information for enclosed area on map for quick analysis
• Layer Menu/Download Map: Show/hide layers plotted on map to toggle between them and Download the map as image visible on screen
• Mobility: Use native Dynamics 365 App for Phones and Tablets to get locational insights
• Heat Map Visualization: Analyze density of CRM data on map for insights through pie/column charts
• Real-Time Tracking: Managers can now track the location of Field Service Reps when on field in real time within Dynamics 365 Field service.
• Land Area Mapping: Define the area of land as agricultural, residential, commercial properties and visualize the same on the map.
• Territory Assignment Rule: Maplytics Admins and Managers can create simple/advanced rules based on which territories will be assigned to the records as per the required conditions.

#maps #bing #maps #map #dyynamics #65crm

Pioneer Challenge: Overview

The Terminal hasn’t changed much since the 1980s. Every other aspect of your workflow is radically different. Especially in the last decade, we’ve seen companies transform industries with the advent of collaborative software: Figma (collaborative design), Github (collaborate code), G Suite (collaborative Word and Excel) and more.

We expect real-time collaboration to dominate future markets as the pandemic runs its course and forces people and businesses online en masse. An entire frontier is now wide open to ambitious engineers.

What, then, is next? We believe Terminal.app is ripe for innovation.

What would this look like in multiplayer mode, built for teams? Surely there’s an easier way to manage SSHing to AWS/GCP. How about chat, CMD+R across the team, and other plum integrations (Stack Overflow, Ruby docs, GPT-3)?

At the very least, reimagining the engineer’s command center is an interesting experiment. And if successful, your work has the potential to fundamentally change the work of every developer on the planet.

We’re excited to announce our second Pioneer Challenge:** Build a New Terminal.**

How It Works

This challenge has three distinct parts. Here’s an overview:

**Phase 1: The Hackathon. **A 48-hour hackathon anyone can join, starting August 7th.

5 winners are selected from the hackathon and are incorporated for free into companies, if they’d like. No equity is exchanged. (All participants receive free Repl.it credits.)

**Phase 2: The Prototype Month. **The 5 companies spend a month building out their prototype. Weekly progress videos are shared on Frontier.

**Phase 3: The Championship. **After a month, the winning team is selected both by popular vote and our team. The winner is awarded Pioneer Gold: $20,000 in exchange for 5% of the company.

To get started, register with your name and past projects here.

Scouting

If you refer the winning team to us, we’ll grant you 0.5% equity in the company. You’ll need them to register with a unique link you can generate for yourself here.

There might be extreme circumstances where we can’t grant you the equity (depending on the country you’re in, for example). We’ll attempt to exhaust all reasonable legal options to make good on this.

**Apply now: **https://pioneer.app/challenge

#hackathon #terminal #investment #coding #remote #events #hackathon-participation #hackathons