YiXu Zhang

YiXu Zhang

1602295064

Using WebXR With Babylon.js

In this overview of WebXR technologies and the Babylon.js framework, we’ll embark on a journey through the past, present, and future of mixed reality both on the web and on immersive headsets. We’ll inspect the underpinnings of WebXR and the most important aspects of the WebXR Device API before turning our attention to Babylon.js, a framework for building immersive applications in JavaScript for web, mobile, and headset. This tutorial is geared toward web and JavaScript developers who build web applications but are looking to dip their toes into immersive experiences.

Immersive experiences, especially those governed by mixed reality (XR), which encompasses both augmented and virtual reality, are quickly gaining new attention among developers and architects interested in reaching users and customers in novel ways. For many years, the lack of adoption of mixed reality experiences came down to hardware — too expensive and unwieldy — and software — too complex and finicky to use.

But the Coronavirus pandemic may be scrambling all of those old calculations by encouraging the sorts of experiences that are mostly limited to the gaming world, which is seeing immense growth in playing time during the current crisis. The math behind three-dimensional spaces can also present barriers to developers, but fortunately, you need only a little vector geometry and matrix math to succeed with XR experiences, not a college course in linear algebra and multivariate calculus.

Though browser support for WebXR is widening, building immersive experiences into browsers or headsets can be complicated due to shifting specifications and APIs as well as rapidly evolving frameworks and best practices. But incorporating immersion into your next web application can also introduce new dimensionality and richness to your user experience — all without the need to learn a new programming language.

  • What Is WebXR?
    • The WebXR Specification And Browser Support
    • Field Of View (FOV) And Degrees of Freedom (DoF)
    • WebXR Session Modes
  • Setting A Scene With WebXR And Babylon.js
    • Introducing Babylon.js
    • Lights, Camera, Action!
      • A Quick Aside On WebXR Geometry
      • Cameras
      • Lights
      • Light Sources
      • Light Parameters
    • Taking Shape: Set And Parametric Shapes
    • Putting It All Together: Rendering The Scene
    • Next Steps: Supporting And Managing User Input
  • Debugging, Extending, And Bundling Babylon.js
    • Debugging Babylon.js With The Inspector
    • Integrating And Bundling Babylon.js With Other JavaScript
  • Immersing Yourself In WebXR

What Is WebXR?

Simply put, WebXR is the grouping of standards responsible for supporting rendered three-dimensional scenes in virtual and augmented reality, both experiential realms known together as mixed reality (XR). Virtual reality (VR), which presents a fully immersive world whose physical elements are entirely drawn by a device, differs considerably from augmented reality (AR), which instead superimposes graphical elements onto real-world surroundings.

WebXR-compatible devices run the gamut from immersive 3D headsets with built-in motion and orientation tracking and names like Vive, Oculus, and Hololens to eyeglasses with graphics placed over real-world images and smartphones that display the world — and additional elements — on their native cameras.

The WebXR Specification And Browser Support

The WebXR Device API is the primary conduit by which developers can interact with immersive headsets, AR eyeglasses, and AR-enabled smartphones. It includes capabilities for developers to discover compatible output devices, render a three-dimensional scene to the device at the correct frame rate, mirror the output to a two-dimensional display (such as a 2D web browser), and create vectors that capture the movements of input controls.

Currently a working draft, the WebXR specification is a combination of the foregoing WebVR API, which was designed solely for virtual reality use cases, and the all-new WebXR Augmented Reality Module, which remains highly experimental. WebVR, formerly the predominant and recommended approach for virtual reality experiences, is now superseded by WebXR, and many frameworks and libraries offer migration strategies between WebVR and the newer WebXR specification.

Though WebXR is now witnessing adoption across the industry, browser support remains spotty, and it’s not yet guaranteed that a mixed reality application built according to the WebXR specification will work off the shelf in production.

Chrome 79, Edge 79, Chrome for Android 79, and Samsung Internet 11.2 all offer full WebXR support. But for unsupported browsers like Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, Safari, or certain mobile browsers (Android webview, Firefox for Android, Opera for Android, and Safari on iOS), there’s a WebXR Polyfill available thanks to WebXR community members that implements the WebXR Device API in JavaScript so that developers can write applications according to the latest state of the specification. On Firefox for web and Firefox for Android, you can enable the experimental feature flag by navigating to about:config and setting dom.vr.webxr.enabled to true in your browser’s advanced settings.

Installing the WebXR API Emulator on Chrome or Firefox on a personal computer will introduce additional tools to help you with debugging and testing.

The WebXR Device API depends on WebGL (Web Graphics Library), the rendering engine that supports three-dimensional graphics, and therefore employs many WebGL concepts when it performs the rendering, lighting, and texturing needed for a scene. Though the deepest reaches of WebGL are well beyond the scope of this article, those already familiar with WebGL will benefit from existing expertise.

Several open-source JavaScript frameworks are available to interact with WebGL and WebXR, namely Three.js and Babylon.js. A-Frame, a browser-based, markup-focused approach to WebXR, is built on top of Three.js. In this tutorial, we spotlight Babylon.js, which has gained attention as of late due to its large API surface area and relative stability. But these aren’t like the JavaScript libraries and frameworks we use to build two-dimensional web applications; instead, they play in the sandbox of three-dimensional spaces.

Field Of View (FOV) And Degrees of Freedom (DoF)

In this article, we’ll focus on building a simple immersive experience with limited input and a static object, which means our need for deep knowledge about WebGL is minimal. But there are critical WebXR concepts outside of WebGL that are fundamental not to three-dimensional graphics themselves but how to interact with three-dimensional spaces. Because WebXR is rooted in a viewer’s experience, everything revolves around the immersive headset or viewport the user faces.

All headsets and smartphones have a camera serving as the user’s viewport into an immersive experience. Every camera has a certain field of view (FOV) that encompasses the extent of the viewer’s surroundings that is visible at any given time in a device. A single human eye has an FOV of 135º, while two human eyes, with overlapping FOVs, have a combined FOV of 220º wide. According to MDN, most headsets range between 90º to 150º in their field of view.

The virtual or augmented world seen through the camera’s field of view can be adjusted through movement, which occurs along degrees of freedom whenever a device is shifted in certain ways while the user remains stationary. Rotational movement occurs along three degrees of freedom (3DoF), which is a baseline for most basic immersive headsets:

  • Pitch is movement incurred by looking up and down. In pitch, the user’s head pivots on the x-axis, which extends horizontally across the viewport.
  • Yaw is movement incurred by looking left and right. In yaw, the user’s head pivots on the y-axis, which extends vertically across the viewport.
  • Roll is movement incurred by tilting left and right. In roll, the user’s head pivots on the z-axis, which extends forward into the viewport and into the horizon.

A diagram showing three degrees of freedom in rotational movement, with yaw, pitch, and roll.

Rotational movement occurs along three degrees of freedom (3DoF): pitch (pivoting on the x-axis), yaw (pivoting on the y-axis), and roll (pivoting on the z-axis). (Large preview)

Though three degrees of freedom are sufficient for simpler immersive experiences, users typically wish to move through space rather than merely changing their perspective on it. For this, we need six degrees of freedom (6DoF), whose latter three degrees define translational movement through space — forward and reverse, left and right, up and down — to pitch, yaw, and roll. In short, 6DoF includes not just pivoting along the x-, y-, and z-axes but also moving along them. Due to the frequent requirement of external sensors to detect translational movement, only high-end headsets support all six degrees.

A diagram showing six degrees of freedom in rotational and translational movement.

Rotational and translational movement occur along six degrees of freedom (6DoF). (Large preview)

WebXR Session Modes

With WebXR superseding the foregoing WebVR specification, it now provides one API as a single source of truth for both augmented and virtual reality. Each WebXR application begins by kicking off a session, which represents an immersive experience in progress. For virtual reality, WebXR makes available two session modes: inline, which deposits a rendered scene into a browser document, and immersive-vr, which depends on a headset. For augmented reality, because rendering is only possible into smartphone cameras and transparent glasses or goggles instead of browsers, immersive-ar is the only available mode.

Because many of us don’t have an immersive headset handy at home, and because the WebXR Augmented Reality Module remains in heavy development, we’ll focus our attention on an immersive VR experience that can be rendered into a browser canvas.

Setting A Scene With WebXR And Babylon.js

In this section, we’ll learn how to create and render a WebXR scene with Babylon.js, the surroundings of our environment and the setting of our experience, before turning any attention to actions like user input or motion. Babylon.js is a free and open-source web rendering engine based on WebGL that includes support for WebXR and cross-platform applications in the form of Babylon Native. Babylon.js offers a slew of additional features, including a low-code Node Material Editor for shader creation, and deep integration with WebXR features like session and input management. The Babylon.js website also provides playground and sandbox environments.

Though selecting between Babylon.js and Three.js comes down to developer preference, Three.js focuses on extensibility over comprehensiveness, with a host of interchangeable modules that add supplemental functionality. Babylon.js, meanwhile, provides a more full-featured suite that may prove overkill for smaller projects but does offer the needed surface area for many implementations.

Introducing Babylon.js

Though you can handle all of the interactions with the WebXR Device API yourself, Babylon.js provides an optional Default Experience Helper that can set up and shut down sessions on your behalf. The Default WebXR experience helper also includes input controls and other features, as well as a rudimentary HTML button to enter the immersive experience. To experiment with the default experience helper, let’s write an HTML page that provides a canvas for XR display and serves the Babylon.js source from a CDN. You can find this HTML page at the GitHub repository for this tutorial on the main branch.

Open index.html in your preferred code editor and in a browser. For this first portion of the tutorial, we’ll inspect the file instead of adding code. In a WebXR-enabled browser like Chrome or Firefox (with the WebXR feature flag enabled in the case of Firefox), you’ll see a canvas containing the initial Babylon.js playground — a “Hello World” of sorts — and you can drag your mouse on the screen to reorient yourself. The screenshot below depicts this initial state.

A screenshot showing the initial state of the Babylon.js default playground.

The initial state of the Babylon.js default playground. (Large preview)

First, we’ll embed the latest versions of Babylon.js from the Babylon CDN as well as other helpful dependencies. We’ll also add some styles for our scene canvas element in <body>, which is where our immersive experience will render.

<!-- babylon-webxr/index.html -->
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Babylon WebXR Demo</title>

    <!-- Embed latest version of Babylon.js. -->
    <script src="https://cdn.babylonjs.com/babylon.js"></script>

    <!-- Embed Babylon loader scripts for .gltf and other filetypes. -->
    <script src="https://cdn.babylonjs.com/loaders/babylonjs.loaders.min.js"></script>

    <!-- Embed pep.js for consistent cross-browser pointer events. -->
    <script src="https://code.jquery.com/pep/0.4.3/pep.js"></script>

    <style>
      html, body {
        overflow: hidden;
        width: 100%;
        height: 100%;
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
        box-sizing: border-box;
      }
      #render-canvas {
        width: 100%;
        height: 100%;
        touch-action: none;
      }
    </style>
  </head>

  <body>
    <canvas id="render-canvas"></canvas>

Now it’s time for our Babylon.js implementation. Inside a <script> element just before the terminal </body> tag, we start by identifying our canvas element to Babylon.js during the instantiation of a new Babylon engine with default configuration.

<!-- Our Babylon.js implementation. -->
<script>
  // Identify canvas element to script.
  const canvas = document.getElementById('render-canvas');

  // Initialize Babylon.js variables.
  let engine,
      scene,
      sceneToRender;
  const createDefaultEngine = function () {
    return new BABYLON.Engine(canvas, true, {
      preserveDrawingBuffer: true,
      stencil: true
    });
  };

#javascript #babylon #webxr #programming #developer

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Using WebXR With Babylon.js

NBB: Ad-hoc CLJS Scripting on Node.js

Nbb

Not babashka. Node.js babashka!?

Ad-hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Status

Experimental. Please report issues here.

Goals and features

Nbb's main goal is to make it easy to get started with ad hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Additional goals and features are:

  • Fast startup without relying on a custom version of Node.js.
  • Small artifact (current size is around 1.2MB).
  • First class macros.
  • Support building small TUI apps using Reagent.
  • Complement babashka with libraries from the Node.js ecosystem.

Requirements

Nbb requires Node.js v12 or newer.

How does this tool work?

CLJS code is evaluated through SCI, the same interpreter that powers babashka. Because SCI works with advanced compilation, the bundle size, especially when combined with other dependencies, is smaller than what you get with self-hosted CLJS. That makes startup faster. The trade-off is that execution is less performant and that only a subset of CLJS is available (e.g. no deftype, yet).

Usage

Install nbb from NPM:

$ npm install nbb -g

Omit -g for a local install.

Try out an expression:

$ nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6

And then install some other NPM libraries to use in the script. E.g.:

$ npm install csv-parse shelljs zx

Create a script which uses the NPM libraries:

(ns script
  (:require ["csv-parse/lib/sync$default" :as csv-parse]
            ["fs" :as fs]
            ["path" :as path]
            ["shelljs$default" :as sh]
            ["term-size$default" :as term-size]
            ["zx$default" :as zx]
            ["zx$fs" :as zxfs]
            [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn (path/resolve "."))

(prn (term-size))

(println (count (str (fs/readFileSync *file*))))

(prn (sh/ls "."))

(prn (csv-parse "foo,bar"))

(prn (zxfs/existsSync *file*))

(zx/$ #js ["ls"])

Call the script:

$ nbb script.cljs
"/private/tmp/test-script"
#js {:columns 216, :rows 47}
510
#js ["node_modules" "package-lock.json" "package.json" "script.cljs"]
#js [#js ["foo" "bar"]]
true
$ ls
node_modules
package-lock.json
package.json
script.cljs

Macros

Nbb has first class support for macros: you can define them right inside your .cljs file, like you are used to from JVM Clojure. Consider the plet macro to make working with promises more palatable:

(defmacro plet
  [bindings & body]
  (let [binding-pairs (reverse (partition 2 bindings))
        body (cons 'do body)]
    (reduce (fn [body [sym expr]]
              (let [expr (list '.resolve 'js/Promise expr)]
                (list '.then expr (list 'clojure.core/fn (vector sym)
                                        body))))
            body
            binding-pairs)))

Using this macro we can look async code more like sync code. Consider this puppeteer example:

(-> (.launch puppeteer)
      (.then (fn [browser]
               (-> (.newPage browser)
                   (.then (fn [page]
                            (-> (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
                                (.then #(.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"}))
                                (.catch #(js/console.log %))
                                (.then #(.close browser)))))))))

Using plet this becomes:

(plet [browser (.launch puppeteer)
       page (.newPage browser)
       _ (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
       _ (-> (.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"})
             (.catch #(js/console.log %)))]
      (.close browser))

See the puppeteer example for the full code.

Since v0.0.36, nbb includes promesa which is a library to deal with promises. The above plet macro is similar to promesa.core/let.

Startup time

$ time nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6
nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'   0.17s  user 0.02s system 109% cpu 0.168 total

The baseline startup time for a script is about 170ms seconds on my laptop. When invoked via npx this adds another 300ms or so, so for faster startup, either use a globally installed nbb or use $(npm bin)/nbb script.cljs to bypass npx.

Dependencies

NPM dependencies

Nbb does not depend on any NPM dependencies. All NPM libraries loaded by a script are resolved relative to that script. When using the Reagent module, React is resolved in the same way as any other NPM library.

Classpath

To load .cljs files from local paths or dependencies, you can use the --classpath argument. The current dir is added to the classpath automatically. So if there is a file foo/bar.cljs relative to your current dir, then you can load it via (:require [foo.bar :as fb]). Note that nbb uses the same naming conventions for namespaces and directories as other Clojure tools: foo-bar in the namespace name becomes foo_bar in the directory name.

To load dependencies from the Clojure ecosystem, you can use the Clojure CLI or babashka to download them and produce a classpath:

$ classpath="$(clojure -A:nbb -Spath -Sdeps '{:aliases {:nbb {:replace-deps {com.github.seancorfield/honeysql {:git/tag "v2.0.0-rc5" :git/sha "01c3a55"}}}}}')"

and then feed it to the --classpath argument:

$ nbb --classpath "$classpath" -e "(require '[honey.sql :as sql]) (sql/format {:select :foo :from :bar :where [:= :baz 2]})"
["SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE baz = ?" 2]

Currently nbb only reads from directories, not jar files, so you are encouraged to use git libs. Support for .jar files will be added later.

Current file

The name of the file that is currently being executed is available via nbb.core/*file* or on the metadata of vars:

(ns foo
  (:require [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn *file*) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

(defn f [])
(prn (:file (meta #'f))) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

Reagent

Nbb includes reagent.core which will be lazily loaded when required. You can use this together with ink to create a TUI application:

$ npm install ink

ink-demo.cljs:

(ns ink-demo
  (:require ["ink" :refer [render Text]]
            [reagent.core :as r]))

(defonce state (r/atom 0))

(doseq [n (range 1 11)]
  (js/setTimeout #(swap! state inc) (* n 500)))

(defn hello []
  [:> Text {:color "green"} "Hello, world! " @state])

(render (r/as-element [hello]))

Promesa

Working with callbacks and promises can become tedious. Since nbb v0.0.36 the promesa.core namespace is included with the let and do! macros. An example:

(ns prom
  (:require [promesa.core :as p]))

(defn sleep [ms]
  (js/Promise.
   (fn [resolve _]
     (js/setTimeout resolve ms))))

(defn do-stuff
  []
  (p/do!
   (println "Doing stuff which takes a while")
   (sleep 1000)
   1))

(p/let [a (do-stuff)
        b (inc a)
        c (do-stuff)
        d (+ b c)]
  (prn d))
$ nbb prom.cljs
Doing stuff which takes a while
Doing stuff which takes a while
3

Also see API docs.

Js-interop

Since nbb v0.0.75 applied-science/js-interop is available:

(ns example
  (:require [applied-science.js-interop :as j]))

(def o (j/lit {:a 1 :b 2 :c {:d 1}}))

(prn (j/select-keys o [:a :b])) ;; #js {:a 1, :b 2}
(prn (j/get-in o [:c :d])) ;; 1

Most of this library is supported in nbb, except the following:

  • destructuring using :syms
  • property access using .-x notation. In nbb, you must use keywords.

See the example of what is currently supported.

Examples

See the examples directory for small examples.

Also check out these projects built with nbb:

API

See API documentation.

Migrating to shadow-cljs

See this gist on how to convert an nbb script or project to shadow-cljs.

Build

Prequisites:

  • babashka >= 0.4.0
  • Clojure CLI >= 1.10.3.933
  • Node.js 16.5.0 (lower version may work, but this is the one I used to build)

To build:

  • Clone and cd into this repo
  • bb release

Run bb tasks for more project-related tasks.

Download Details:
Author: borkdude
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/borkdude/nbb 
License: EPL-1.0

#node #javascript

Aria Barnes

Aria Barnes

1622719015

Why use Node.js for Web Development? Benefits and Examples of Apps

Front-end web development has been overwhelmed by JavaScript highlights for quite a long time. Google, Facebook, Wikipedia, and most of all online pages use JS for customer side activities. As of late, it additionally made a shift to cross-platform mobile development as a main technology in React Native, Nativescript, Apache Cordova, and other crossover devices. 

Throughout the most recent couple of years, Node.js moved to backend development as well. Designers need to utilize a similar tech stack for the whole web project without learning another language for server-side development. Node.js is a device that adjusts JS usefulness and syntax to the backend. 

What is Node.js? 

Node.js isn’t a language, or library, or system. It’s a runtime situation: commonly JavaScript needs a program to work, however Node.js makes appropriate settings for JS to run outside of the program. It’s based on a JavaScript V8 motor that can run in Chrome, different programs, or independently. 

The extent of V8 is to change JS program situated code into machine code — so JS turns into a broadly useful language and can be perceived by servers. This is one of the advantages of utilizing Node.js in web application development: it expands the usefulness of JavaScript, permitting designers to coordinate the language with APIs, different languages, and outside libraries.

What Are the Advantages of Node.js Web Application Development? 

Of late, organizations have been effectively changing from their backend tech stacks to Node.js. LinkedIn picked Node.js over Ruby on Rails since it took care of expanding responsibility better and decreased the quantity of servers by multiple times. PayPal and Netflix did something comparative, just they had a goal to change their design to microservices. We should investigate the motivations to pick Node.JS for web application development and when we are planning to hire node js developers. 

Amazing Tech Stack for Web Development 

The principal thing that makes Node.js a go-to environment for web development is its JavaScript legacy. It’s the most well known language right now with a great many free devices and a functioning local area. Node.js, because of its association with JS, immediately rose in ubiquity — presently it has in excess of 368 million downloads and a great many free tools in the bundle module. 

Alongside prevalence, Node.js additionally acquired the fundamental JS benefits: 

  • quick execution and information preparing; 
  • exceptionally reusable code; 
  • the code is not difficult to learn, compose, read, and keep up; 
  • tremendous asset library, a huge number of free aides, and a functioning local area. 

In addition, it’s a piece of a well known MEAN tech stack (the blend of MongoDB, Express.js, Angular, and Node.js — four tools that handle all vital parts of web application development). 

Designers Can Utilize JavaScript for the Whole Undertaking 

This is perhaps the most clear advantage of Node.js web application development. JavaScript is an unquestionable requirement for web development. Regardless of whether you construct a multi-page or single-page application, you need to know JS well. On the off chance that you are now OK with JavaScript, learning Node.js won’t be an issue. Grammar, fundamental usefulness, primary standards — every one of these things are comparable. 

In the event that you have JS designers in your group, it will be simpler for them to learn JS-based Node than a totally new dialect. What’s more, the front-end and back-end codebase will be basically the same, simple to peruse, and keep up — in light of the fact that they are both JS-based. 

A Quick Environment for Microservice Development 

There’s another motivation behind why Node.js got famous so rapidly. The environment suits well the idea of microservice development (spilling stone monument usefulness into handfuls or many more modest administrations). 

Microservices need to speak with one another rapidly — and Node.js is probably the quickest device in information handling. Among the fundamental Node.js benefits for programming development are its non-obstructing algorithms.

Node.js measures a few demands all at once without trusting that the first will be concluded. Many microservices can send messages to one another, and they will be gotten and addressed all the while. 

Versatile Web Application Development 

Node.js was worked in view of adaptability — its name really says it. The environment permits numerous hubs to run all the while and speak with one another. Here’s the reason Node.js adaptability is better than other web backend development arrangements. 

Node.js has a module that is liable for load adjusting for each running CPU center. This is one of numerous Node.js module benefits: you can run various hubs all at once, and the environment will naturally adjust the responsibility. 

Node.js permits even apportioning: you can part your application into various situations. You show various forms of the application to different clients, in light of their age, interests, area, language, and so on. This builds personalization and diminishes responsibility. Hub accomplishes this with kid measures — tasks that rapidly speak with one another and share a similar root. 

What’s more, Node’s non-hindering solicitation handling framework adds to fast, letting applications measure a great many solicitations. 

Control Stream Highlights

Numerous designers consider nonconcurrent to be one of the two impediments and benefits of Node.js web application development. In Node, at whatever point the capacity is executed, the code consequently sends a callback. As the quantity of capacities develops, so does the number of callbacks — and you end up in a circumstance known as the callback damnation. 

In any case, Node.js offers an exit plan. You can utilize systems that will plan capacities and sort through callbacks. Systems will associate comparable capacities consequently — so you can track down an essential component via search or in an envelope. At that point, there’s no compelling reason to look through callbacks.

 

Final Words

So, these are some of the top benefits of Nodejs in web application development. This is how Nodejs is contributing a lot to the field of web application development. 

I hope now you are totally aware of the whole process of how Nodejs is really important for your web project. If you are looking to hire a node js development company in India then I would suggest that you take a little consultancy too whenever you call. 

Good Luck!

Original Source

#node.js development company in india #node js development company #hire node js developers #hire node.js developers in india #node.js development services #node.js development

Why Use WordPress? What Can You Do With WordPress?

Can you use WordPress for anything other than blogging? To your surprise, yes. WordPress is more than just a blogging tool, and it has helped thousands of websites and web applications to thrive. The use of WordPress powers around 40% of online projects, and today in our blog, we would visit some amazing uses of WordPress other than blogging.
What Is The Use Of WordPress?

WordPress is the most popular website platform in the world. It is the first choice of businesses that want to set a feature-rich and dynamic Content Management System. So, if you ask what WordPress is used for, the answer is – everything. It is a super-flexible, feature-rich and secure platform that offers everything to build unique websites and applications. Let’s start knowing them:

1. Multiple Websites Under A Single Installation
WordPress Multisite allows you to develop multiple sites from a single WordPress installation. You can download WordPress and start building websites you want to launch under a single server. Literally speaking, you can handle hundreds of sites from one single dashboard, which now needs applause.
It is a highly efficient platform that allows you to easily run several websites under the same login credentials. One of the best things about WordPress is the themes it has to offer. You can simply download them and plugin for various sites and save space on sites without losing their speed.

2. WordPress Social Network
WordPress can be used for high-end projects such as Social Media Network. If you don’t have the money and patience to hire a coder and invest months in building a feature-rich social media site, go for WordPress. It is one of the most amazing uses of WordPress. Its stunning CMS is unbeatable. And you can build sites as good as Facebook or Reddit etc. It can just make the process a lot easier.
To set up a social media network, you would have to download a WordPress Plugin called BuddyPress. It would allow you to connect a community page with ease and would provide all the necessary features of a community or social media. It has direct messaging, activity stream, user groups, extended profiles, and so much more. You just have to download and configure it.
If BuddyPress doesn’t meet all your needs, don’t give up on your dreams. You can try out WP Symposium or PeepSo. There are also several themes you can use to build a social network.

3. Create A Forum For Your Brand’s Community
Communities are very important for your business. They help you stay in constant connection with your users and consumers. And allow you to turn them into a loyal customer base. Meanwhile, there are many good technologies that can be used for building a community page – the good old WordPress is still the best.
It is the best community development technology. If you want to build your online community, you need to consider all the amazing features you get with WordPress. Plugins such as BB Press is an open-source, template-driven PHP/ MySQL forum software. It is very simple and doesn’t hamper the experience of the website.
Other tools such as wpFoRo and Asgaros Forum are equally good for creating a community blog. They are lightweight tools that are easy to manage and integrate with your WordPress site easily. However, there is only one tiny problem; you need to have some technical knowledge to build a WordPress Community blog page.

4. Shortcodes
Since we gave you a problem in the previous section, we would also give you a perfect solution for it. You might not know to code, but you have shortcodes. Shortcodes help you execute functions without having to code. It is an easy way to build an amazing website, add new features, customize plugins easily. They are short lines of code, and rather than memorizing multiple lines; you can have zero technical knowledge and start building a feature-rich website or application.
There are also plugins like Shortcoder, Shortcodes Ultimate, and the Basics available on WordPress that can be used, and you would not even have to remember the shortcodes.

5. Build Online Stores
If you still think about why to use WordPress, use it to build an online store. You can start selling your goods online and start selling. It is an affordable technology that helps you build a feature-rich eCommerce store with WordPress.
WooCommerce is an extension of WordPress and is one of the most used eCommerce solutions. WooCommerce holds a 28% share of the global market and is one of the best ways to set up an online store. It allows you to build user-friendly and professional online stores and has thousands of free and paid extensions. Moreover as an open-source platform, and you don’t have to pay for the license.
Apart from WooCommerce, there are Easy Digital Downloads, iThemes Exchange, Shopify eCommerce plugin, and so much more available.

6. Security Features
WordPress takes security very seriously. It offers tons of external solutions that help you in safeguarding your WordPress site. While there is no way to ensure 100% security, it provides regular updates with security patches and provides several plugins to help with backups, two-factor authorization, and more.
By choosing hosting providers like WP Engine, you can improve the security of the website. It helps in threat detection, manage patching and updates, and internal security audits for the customers, and so much more.

Read More

#use of wordpress #use wordpress for business website #use wordpress for website #what is use of wordpress #why use wordpress #why use wordpress to build a website

YiXu Zhang

YiXu Zhang

1602295064

Using WebXR With Babylon.js

In this overview of WebXR technologies and the Babylon.js framework, we’ll embark on a journey through the past, present, and future of mixed reality both on the web and on immersive headsets. We’ll inspect the underpinnings of WebXR and the most important aspects of the WebXR Device API before turning our attention to Babylon.js, a framework for building immersive applications in JavaScript for web, mobile, and headset. This tutorial is geared toward web and JavaScript developers who build web applications but are looking to dip their toes into immersive experiences.

Immersive experiences, especially those governed by mixed reality (XR), which encompasses both augmented and virtual reality, are quickly gaining new attention among developers and architects interested in reaching users and customers in novel ways. For many years, the lack of adoption of mixed reality experiences came down to hardware — too expensive and unwieldy — and software — too complex and finicky to use.

But the Coronavirus pandemic may be scrambling all of those old calculations by encouraging the sorts of experiences that are mostly limited to the gaming world, which is seeing immense growth in playing time during the current crisis. The math behind three-dimensional spaces can also present barriers to developers, but fortunately, you need only a little vector geometry and matrix math to succeed with XR experiences, not a college course in linear algebra and multivariate calculus.

Though browser support for WebXR is widening, building immersive experiences into browsers or headsets can be complicated due to shifting specifications and APIs as well as rapidly evolving frameworks and best practices. But incorporating immersion into your next web application can also introduce new dimensionality and richness to your user experience — all without the need to learn a new programming language.

  • What Is WebXR?
    • The WebXR Specification And Browser Support
    • Field Of View (FOV) And Degrees of Freedom (DoF)
    • WebXR Session Modes
  • Setting A Scene With WebXR And Babylon.js
    • Introducing Babylon.js
    • Lights, Camera, Action!
      • A Quick Aside On WebXR Geometry
      • Cameras
      • Lights
      • Light Sources
      • Light Parameters
    • Taking Shape: Set And Parametric Shapes
    • Putting It All Together: Rendering The Scene
    • Next Steps: Supporting And Managing User Input
  • Debugging, Extending, And Bundling Babylon.js
    • Debugging Babylon.js With The Inspector
    • Integrating And Bundling Babylon.js With Other JavaScript
  • Immersing Yourself In WebXR

What Is WebXR?

Simply put, WebXR is the grouping of standards responsible for supporting rendered three-dimensional scenes in virtual and augmented reality, both experiential realms known together as mixed reality (XR). Virtual reality (VR), which presents a fully immersive world whose physical elements are entirely drawn by a device, differs considerably from augmented reality (AR), which instead superimposes graphical elements onto real-world surroundings.

WebXR-compatible devices run the gamut from immersive 3D headsets with built-in motion and orientation tracking and names like Vive, Oculus, and Hololens to eyeglasses with graphics placed over real-world images and smartphones that display the world — and additional elements — on their native cameras.

The WebXR Specification And Browser Support

The WebXR Device API is the primary conduit by which developers can interact with immersive headsets, AR eyeglasses, and AR-enabled smartphones. It includes capabilities for developers to discover compatible output devices, render a three-dimensional scene to the device at the correct frame rate, mirror the output to a two-dimensional display (such as a 2D web browser), and create vectors that capture the movements of input controls.

Currently a working draft, the WebXR specification is a combination of the foregoing WebVR API, which was designed solely for virtual reality use cases, and the all-new WebXR Augmented Reality Module, which remains highly experimental. WebVR, formerly the predominant and recommended approach for virtual reality experiences, is now superseded by WebXR, and many frameworks and libraries offer migration strategies between WebVR and the newer WebXR specification.

Though WebXR is now witnessing adoption across the industry, browser support remains spotty, and it’s not yet guaranteed that a mixed reality application built according to the WebXR specification will work off the shelf in production.

Chrome 79, Edge 79, Chrome for Android 79, and Samsung Internet 11.2 all offer full WebXR support. But for unsupported browsers like Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, Safari, or certain mobile browsers (Android webview, Firefox for Android, Opera for Android, and Safari on iOS), there’s a WebXR Polyfill available thanks to WebXR community members that implements the WebXR Device API in JavaScript so that developers can write applications according to the latest state of the specification. On Firefox for web and Firefox for Android, you can enable the experimental feature flag by navigating to about:config and setting dom.vr.webxr.enabled to true in your browser’s advanced settings.

Installing the WebXR API Emulator on Chrome or Firefox on a personal computer will introduce additional tools to help you with debugging and testing.

The WebXR Device API depends on WebGL (Web Graphics Library), the rendering engine that supports three-dimensional graphics, and therefore employs many WebGL concepts when it performs the rendering, lighting, and texturing needed for a scene. Though the deepest reaches of WebGL are well beyond the scope of this article, those already familiar with WebGL will benefit from existing expertise.

Several open-source JavaScript frameworks are available to interact with WebGL and WebXR, namely Three.js and Babylon.js. A-Frame, a browser-based, markup-focused approach to WebXR, is built on top of Three.js. In this tutorial, we spotlight Babylon.js, which has gained attention as of late due to its large API surface area and relative stability. But these aren’t like the JavaScript libraries and frameworks we use to build two-dimensional web applications; instead, they play in the sandbox of three-dimensional spaces.

Field Of View (FOV) And Degrees of Freedom (DoF)

In this article, we’ll focus on building a simple immersive experience with limited input and a static object, which means our need for deep knowledge about WebGL is minimal. But there are critical WebXR concepts outside of WebGL that are fundamental not to three-dimensional graphics themselves but how to interact with three-dimensional spaces. Because WebXR is rooted in a viewer’s experience, everything revolves around the immersive headset or viewport the user faces.

All headsets and smartphones have a camera serving as the user’s viewport into an immersive experience. Every camera has a certain field of view (FOV) that encompasses the extent of the viewer’s surroundings that is visible at any given time in a device. A single human eye has an FOV of 135º, while two human eyes, with overlapping FOVs, have a combined FOV of 220º wide. According to MDN, most headsets range between 90º to 150º in their field of view.

The virtual or augmented world seen through the camera’s field of view can be adjusted through movement, which occurs along degrees of freedom whenever a device is shifted in certain ways while the user remains stationary. Rotational movement occurs along three degrees of freedom (3DoF), which is a baseline for most basic immersive headsets:

  • Pitch is movement incurred by looking up and down. In pitch, the user’s head pivots on the x-axis, which extends horizontally across the viewport.
  • Yaw is movement incurred by looking left and right. In yaw, the user’s head pivots on the y-axis, which extends vertically across the viewport.
  • Roll is movement incurred by tilting left and right. In roll, the user’s head pivots on the z-axis, which extends forward into the viewport and into the horizon.

A diagram showing three degrees of freedom in rotational movement, with yaw, pitch, and roll.

Rotational movement occurs along three degrees of freedom (3DoF): pitch (pivoting on the x-axis), yaw (pivoting on the y-axis), and roll (pivoting on the z-axis). (Large preview)

Though three degrees of freedom are sufficient for simpler immersive experiences, users typically wish to move through space rather than merely changing their perspective on it. For this, we need six degrees of freedom (6DoF), whose latter three degrees define translational movement through space — forward and reverse, left and right, up and down — to pitch, yaw, and roll. In short, 6DoF includes not just pivoting along the x-, y-, and z-axes but also moving along them. Due to the frequent requirement of external sensors to detect translational movement, only high-end headsets support all six degrees.

A diagram showing six degrees of freedom in rotational and translational movement.

Rotational and translational movement occur along six degrees of freedom (6DoF). (Large preview)

WebXR Session Modes

With WebXR superseding the foregoing WebVR specification, it now provides one API as a single source of truth for both augmented and virtual reality. Each WebXR application begins by kicking off a session, which represents an immersive experience in progress. For virtual reality, WebXR makes available two session modes: inline, which deposits a rendered scene into a browser document, and immersive-vr, which depends on a headset. For augmented reality, because rendering is only possible into smartphone cameras and transparent glasses or goggles instead of browsers, immersive-ar is the only available mode.

Because many of us don’t have an immersive headset handy at home, and because the WebXR Augmented Reality Module remains in heavy development, we’ll focus our attention on an immersive VR experience that can be rendered into a browser canvas.

Setting A Scene With WebXR And Babylon.js

In this section, we’ll learn how to create and render a WebXR scene with Babylon.js, the surroundings of our environment and the setting of our experience, before turning any attention to actions like user input or motion. Babylon.js is a free and open-source web rendering engine based on WebGL that includes support for WebXR and cross-platform applications in the form of Babylon Native. Babylon.js offers a slew of additional features, including a low-code Node Material Editor for shader creation, and deep integration with WebXR features like session and input management. The Babylon.js website also provides playground and sandbox environments.

Though selecting between Babylon.js and Three.js comes down to developer preference, Three.js focuses on extensibility over comprehensiveness, with a host of interchangeable modules that add supplemental functionality. Babylon.js, meanwhile, provides a more full-featured suite that may prove overkill for smaller projects but does offer the needed surface area for many implementations.

Introducing Babylon.js

Though you can handle all of the interactions with the WebXR Device API yourself, Babylon.js provides an optional Default Experience Helper that can set up and shut down sessions on your behalf. The Default WebXR experience helper also includes input controls and other features, as well as a rudimentary HTML button to enter the immersive experience. To experiment with the default experience helper, let’s write an HTML page that provides a canvas for XR display and serves the Babylon.js source from a CDN. You can find this HTML page at the GitHub repository for this tutorial on the main branch.

Open index.html in your preferred code editor and in a browser. For this first portion of the tutorial, we’ll inspect the file instead of adding code. In a WebXR-enabled browser like Chrome or Firefox (with the WebXR feature flag enabled in the case of Firefox), you’ll see a canvas containing the initial Babylon.js playground — a “Hello World” of sorts — and you can drag your mouse on the screen to reorient yourself. The screenshot below depicts this initial state.

A screenshot showing the initial state of the Babylon.js default playground.

The initial state of the Babylon.js default playground. (Large preview)

First, we’ll embed the latest versions of Babylon.js from the Babylon CDN as well as other helpful dependencies. We’ll also add some styles for our scene canvas element in <body>, which is where our immersive experience will render.

<!-- babylon-webxr/index.html -->
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Babylon WebXR Demo</title>

    <!-- Embed latest version of Babylon.js. -->
    <script src="https://cdn.babylonjs.com/babylon.js"></script>

    <!-- Embed Babylon loader scripts for .gltf and other filetypes. -->
    <script src="https://cdn.babylonjs.com/loaders/babylonjs.loaders.min.js"></script>

    <!-- Embed pep.js for consistent cross-browser pointer events. -->
    <script src="https://code.jquery.com/pep/0.4.3/pep.js"></script>

    <style>
      html, body {
        overflow: hidden;
        width: 100%;
        height: 100%;
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
        box-sizing: border-box;
      }
      #render-canvas {
        width: 100%;
        height: 100%;
        touch-action: none;
      }
    </style>
  </head>

  <body>
    <canvas id="render-canvas"></canvas>

Now it’s time for our Babylon.js implementation. Inside a <script> element just before the terminal </body> tag, we start by identifying our canvas element to Babylon.js during the instantiation of a new Babylon engine with default configuration.

<!-- Our Babylon.js implementation. -->
<script>
  // Identify canvas element to script.
  const canvas = document.getElementById('render-canvas');

  // Initialize Babylon.js variables.
  let engine,
      scene,
      sceneToRender;
  const createDefaultEngine = function () {
    return new BABYLON.Engine(canvas, true, {
      preserveDrawingBuffer: true,
      stencil: true
    });
  };

#javascript #babylon #webxr #programming #developer

Hire Dedicated Node.js Developers - Hire Node.js Developers

If you look at the backend technology used by today’s most popular apps there is one thing you would find common among them and that is the use of NodeJS Framework. Yes, the NodeJS framework is that effective and successful.

If you wish to have a strong backend for efficient app performance then have NodeJS at the backend.

WebClues Infotech offers different levels of experienced and expert professionals for your app development needs. So hire a dedicated NodeJS developer from WebClues Infotech with your experience requirement and expertise.

So what are you waiting for? Get your app developed with strong performance parameters from WebClues Infotech

For inquiry click here: https://www.webcluesinfotech.com/hire-nodejs-developer/

Book Free Interview: https://bit.ly/3dDShFg

#hire dedicated node.js developers #hire node.js developers #hire top dedicated node.js developers #hire node.js developers in usa & india #hire node js development company #hire the best node.js developers & programmers